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Getting back to programming...  RSS feed

 
Ivan Jouikov
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Ok, I haven't programmed in a while due to school workload, but now I am back, and I've realized I've lost all my interest. Yet, I remember the GREAT times I had programming, and I want it back!
Can somebody give me some advice on how to get back in the game?
I believe what's slowing me down right now is that I am coming back to my old IDE, NetBeans, and there's like so much stuff that I don't need and it complicates my life so bad, cause I haven't used it in a while...
For some reason (which I never had before) I have the urge to stick to notepad and Ant and do it all by hand... it seems like heaven to me... do you think I should go for it, or should I search for IDE?
 
Frank Carver
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This isn't really particularly appropriate to the servlets forum, so I've moved it to "Java in General (intermediate)" for you.
 
Frank Carver
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To a large extent, I agree with this. Although I'd personally use a text editor which can hold more than one file open at once, and search across all the files when needed.
My recommendation for the best fast-track way to recover the joy of programming in volves the following steps:
  • get a plain text editor that you are comfortable with
  • install Ant, and play with it enough to be able to compile and run simple programs
  • get and install "junit", and get it working with Ant.
  • read about, then try "test driven development" (TDD)


  • I have found that TDD is the most fun and satisfying way of developing software that actually works.
    Most hobby projects are fine when small, but as soon as they get a bit too big, or get left alone for a few months it quickly becomes depressing to work on them as they get more unfamiliar and more buggy. I've found that TDD helps to fight both of these problems, and generally reduces the stress and brings the fun back into programming.
    See the golden rules of stress-free programming, my "Small and Simple Web Applications" article series in the Java Ranch Journal, and sites about TDD in general such as http://www.agiledata.org/essays/tdd.html and http://www.testdriven.com/
     
    Don't get me started about those stupid light bulbs.
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