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applet/file sharing  RSS feed

 
Antoine Waugh
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heya,
i have been approached to create a program (accessible from the internet) that manages rostering (like a calender).
i am aware that due to security issues applet's try to prevent manipulation and access to files kept on their server. what is the best approach to have a working and accessible set of files (ie xml..) that can be modified by my applet.
i will have a server to use, therefore tomcat etc are all possibilities
thanks in advance
-twans
 
Stan James
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You can give an applet permission to get out of the "sand box" and touch things on your PC. Somebody on my team has done this to let the applet use JNI to C++ modules. Sorry I don't know just where you administer the permissions.
But I think you said store the files on the server. Is that what you meant? There's no problem for your servlets and Java classes reading & writing disk files on the server so long as your app has OS permissions.
 
Jeroen Wenting
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Storing everything serverside is best.
Not only does it prevent messy applet security protocols (signed applets, etc. etc.) but it has the big added advantages of enabling regular backups (more easily done on the server than each and every workstation) and allowing people to access their agenda from every workstation in the LAN (based on userid/password).
Of course the exact needs should be discussed with the client, maybe they insist on clientside storage for some reason (but you'll at least have arguments for a complete serverside solution).
The user interface could be either an applet or servlet/JSP, or even a Swing application communicating with the server using SOAP (in which case you can have the files stored on the client, backed up on the server if you want, and transmit the data back and forth as SOAP messages).
The latter is probably the best compromise between a complete serverside solution and using a rich client. Applets are a bitch because they can take forever to download (and applet/servlet communication is troublesome).
By using Java WebStart to launch and install the application you can ensure it's up to date (JWS has an optional autoupdate capability).
 
Antoine Waugh
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thanks to you both for your replies. they were very helpful and im just going to organise the design pattern of the project, and make a judged descision about download time required etc.
i am sure to have further questions, but i will post them on a new thread.
thanks again
-twans
 
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