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Please take a look at the message entitled "Certifications - My Thoughts" by Raj M posted at the Architect Certification Forum on July 13, 2002.
https://coderanch.com/forums/
 
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Well thats the reason we hear of ten year old Indian kids getting certified.
I always used to think why i did not hear of any american kid getting certified. Frankly speaking its just unbelieveable that such small school going kids can get certified.
Well for those guys who "buy" certifications - Ok you might get a job, but you won't succeed in life like this. No shortcuts to hard work!
 
Greenhorn
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Hi,
It is a shame that some people bought certifications in India. Such organizations that sell these certifications should be tracked and should not be allowed to conduct those exams. I feel it is every one's responsibility to support that.
But, I think the people who really suffer most out of this is - Indians who pass the certifications honestly with hard work. Like the 'anonymous' person who posted before, people will tend to jump to conclusion that 'all' Indians who got the certifications are fake, which is obviously not true.
I can't say if it is good or bad, but an average middle class parent in India is very very particular about his child's acadamics and tend to concentrate too much on his acadamic (rather than his alround) development. That is the reason you will find a lot of competition and ten year olds getting certifications. It does not mean they cheated. It also does not mean that any other kid from some other country can not achieve such a thing.
All I can say is that people good and bad exist every where and we shouldn't jump to conclusions.
Thanks.
Murali
SCJP, OOAD/UML
 
Anonymous
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Originally posted by <Anonymous>:
Well thats the reason we hear of ten year old Indian kids getting certified.


Hey! Anonymous,without knowing the truth fully,you shd not a tease a kid like that,whts wrong in a kid of 10 year getting certified ?? Do u need any age qualification for certification or for achieving something new in this world ??if so! can u tell me what age is appropriate ??

Originally posted by <Anonymous>:
Well for those guys who "buy" certifications - Ok you might get a job, but you won't succeed in life like this. No shortcuts to hard work!


Thats True.Only hard works paves good way!.
 
mister krabs
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I don't know any ten year olds that could possibly pass the certification test. When I hear of ten year olds in India and Pakistan passing the certification test, I always assumed it was for the same reason that "The Weekly World News" always reports about legions of killer vampires in China... it's impossible to verify. This reminds me of the 14 year old kid that played in the Little League World Series claiming he was 12. As soon as someone did the research they blew his cover. I am sure if someone did the research on these 10 year olds the cover would be blown.
 
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A friend of mine was taking Computer Science I (4 credit 200-level comp sci course teaching comp sci principles and C) at the same university I attend in Fall 2001. In his class was a nine year old, who according to my friend, seemed way ahead of the rest of the 100 or so other students in the class. He showed up again in the Spring semester for Computer Science II (4 credit 200-level, more comp sci fundamentals, OO and C++), which has calculus pre-reqs.
Kids like this are very far from the norm, but it does happen.
 
High Plains Drifter
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Originally posted by <Anonymous>:
Well thats the reason we hear of ten year old Indian kids getting certified.
I always used to think why i did not hear of any american kid getting certified. Frankly speaking its just unbelieveable that such small school going kids can get certified.


I don't think it's unbelievable, but it is confusing. What's 10-year old going to do with Java certification? Put it on his resume?
The SCJP is an industrial exam. Its primary intent is not to prove one's mastery of Java, but rather give employers a benchmark to apply against potential job candidates.
What happened to the age when people broke into this industry by actually making something?
 
Bartender
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Well this kind of news just makes my personal accomplishment seem all the more impressive.
I just found out I got a 98% on the SCJP2 1.4 Beta test.
That's 4 hours and 161 questions buddies!! 98%.
woot!
And I did it all by studying hard and actually writing lots of java programs over several years.
 
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Initially I was also confused about the news , but from regional magazine, I read the article and the news might be authentic.Here are the links(Magazine is not in english,you can see the pics though! )
http://www.chitralekha.com/magazine1/mpriya1.asp
http://www.chitralekha.com/magazine1/mpriya2.asp
From the article what I read :
1)714 marks are required to pass the exam
2)Girl scored 985 out of 1000
3)It took her around 8 months to study for the exam.
More research later
 
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Shouldnt these kids be going out and climbing trees and running about; stuff that other kids their age should be doing?
Look at it this way. Say a ten year old gets architect certification, by the time theyve finished their formal education and are eligible for work (say 16) surely a lot of the material in the original certification will be out of date?
Cheers,
Mark
 
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Hmmm... I think I go with Mark on this one. Is it really healthy for a young girl to spend 8 months studying for an industrial level exam? Studying and learning is great, but, in my opinion, sometimes, it's just too much.
I suppose everyone has different opinions about parenting. :roll:
 
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I remember a local case, just a few months ago about a boy genis. But it turned out most of his mother faked or lied about his scores. She put so much presure on the child that he tried to kill himself and the courts took the boy away from her. Kids were ment to go out and play. I have also heard of people sending their babies to schools that are suppose to teach them to do amazing tricks at an early age. I even heard a neighbor talking about how she sent her baby to a special camp where he learned to walk at an early age. But you know what, in the end he will not walk any better then the child that walked 6 months later. In fact the baby that walked so early may have problems with the bones in his legs as he gets older. Will the boy that passed the certificate at 12 be a better programmer then the one that passes it at 20? I doubt it. I think these accomplishments are more for the parents then the child. Let a kid be a kid, there are many years for him to work and code Java, but only a few years when he can be a kid.
 
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I cannot agree with you more ..

Originally posted by pamchau:
I remember a local case, just a few months ago about a boy genis. But it turned out most of his mother faked or lied about his scores. She put so much presure on the child that he tried to kill himself and the courts took the boy away from her. Kids were ment to go out and play. I have also heard of people sending their babies to schools that are suppose to teach them to do amazing tricks at an early age. I even heard a neighbor talking about how she sent her baby to a special camp where he learned to walk at an early age. But you know what, in the end he will not walk any better then the child that walked 6 months later. In fact the baby that walked so early may have problems with the bones in his legs as he gets older. Will the boy that passed the certificate at 12 be a better programmer then the one that passes it at 20? I doubt it. I think these accomplishments are more for the parents then the child. Let a kid be a kid, there are many years for him to work and code Java, but only a few years when he can be a kid.

 
Anonymous
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Its this intent by parents that is pushing kids and youngsters to the extreme. There is nothing wrong in an extremely pressurised kid to desperately try to prove himself he is successful in acedamics. He would go to any extent and even be ready to BUY certificates (if he is rich enough). There are always bad businessmen who want to use every opportunity to make money...selling certificates. I have heard of hundreds of cases where Kids suicide after failing exams in India. What more can be serious than this?
 
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Buying a drivers license and killing someone else?
 
Anonymous
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I am not too concerned about people buying certifications. They are just like people who lie on their resumes. What are you going to do about it? But I do hope that the employers are careful and discerning enough to detect the lies and fakes and avoid them. I don’t think too much of the kids who are able to pass the same certifications as I do. It is not something I could not have done at their age had my parents been morons.
 
pamchau
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I have heard parents talk about their children like they are dog. I will teach my child to do this, I will teach my child to do that. It is like the child is a plaything for the parent. I always want to smack them and tell them to let the poor kid be a kid, he or she is not a dog. As for buying certificates, I think I work with a whole bunch of people who bought their degrees and certificates! I know of at least one women who finially admitted she got her MBA over the internet by taking just a few token classes. She did not know even the most basic information. Now every time I work on a project and there is a complete idiot in the group, I always wonder where they bought their qualifications. The internet is full of places where you can buy an education. It was strange to read the story of the women who lied about her son (as mentioned in my prevous post) noone questioned her or wrote to any of the schools she said he got such good grades at. I think I have read about some "big wigs" in our government that have also lied about their qualifications. I also love the people who don't quite come out and say they have such and such degree or went to such and such school, but they hint at it and hope you draw the conclusions that they did. I quess there are many ways to deceive people if that is your intent.
 
Pradip Bhat
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Originally posted by <Gokul>:
Its this intent by parents that is pushing kids and youngsters to the extreme.


Not always, Infact there is a limit to which kids/children can be pressurised.Take the example above mentioned of 11 year girl.Do you think every kid of age 11 can be pressurised so that he/she could pass those exams? There are many other factors.
Ofcourse I don't support these kind of stuffs.
 
Jason Menard
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Originally posted by rahul rege:
Infact there is a limit to which kids/children can be pressurised.


It's age and weight dependant, but I think about 30psi is good in most cases.
 
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
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Originally posted by Jason Menard:
It's age and weight dependant, but I think about 30psi is good in most cases.


Blueberry juice works well. Just ask Violet Beauregarde.
 
Mark Fletcher
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Originally posted by Jason Menard:

It's age and weight dependant, but I think about 30psi is good in most cases.


I can just imagine the kind of scenes that could be created from this...
"Oh my god how many times have I told you DONT PRESSURE THE KIDS!! Thats the third one in as many months! Well Im telling you its your turn to clean up the mess...."
 
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Nice little Willy Wonka reference Thomas.
 
Anonymous
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Kids should be like kids to go out and play - pamchau
There are some kids who enjoy what their playing and excel in them. I remember one of my childhood friend who can hit a marble in a grass patch 10 or 15 feet away. Not that we can see the marble clearly from where he is. Maybe some other kids with telepathy talent direct his marble to hit the obscure marble in the grass patch.
Some kids who are a natural when ask to take up violin or piano lessons turn into composers and later write songs for pop singers or become pop singers themsleves. Can't say that these kids don't like what they're learning. Of course pressuring then too much can have the opposite effect. I know of a friend whose parents threaten to disown him at a small age if he refuse to learn the violin never even go near a violin later in his years even he has force himself to learn the violin his parents wanted him to.
Hmmmmmm, don't really know what I'm trying to get at but I think this is just my humble opinion.
 
Jason Menard
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Originally posted by Thomas Paul:

Blueberry juice works well. Just ask Violet Beauregarde.


Did anyone else find the Oompa Loompas just a little on the creepy side?
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