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Java Beeping

 
Greenhorn
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What I attempting to do is to play a short jingle off of the internal system speaker/beeper. I researched this on java.sun.com and found the following sollution:


The problem is that, when I print instruments.length it is -1. I am working on a computer without any speakers but it does have onboard sound. Also System.out.println("\07"); will beep but Toolkit.getDefaultToolkit().beep(); does not. If anyone knows what is wrong with this code or another way to beep other pitches please help.
Thanks in advance for your time,
Em
 
Ranch Hand
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Toolkit's beep() uses the system's beep sound, not the bell character.
 
Emmy Rauch
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That explains why it doesnt beep, but my main question is how to beep other pitches, even if I must use the JNI to do this can someone give me an example? Thanks
 
Emmy Rauch
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Should I repost this in advanced or give up on life? Eh... I'll do both to have my bases covered.
 
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Thou hast cross-posted... for shame!
 
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I remember back in the days of the Apple ][ (yeah, I'm showing my age but hey, at least I can still remember that far back ) when we could produce tones by toggling the onboard speakers at different frequencies. Of course with that approach you had to take into account the clock speed. I won't even pretend to remember how it was done back then, much less how it can be done on your modern PC. I tried googling around for more info but couldn't find anything.
 
Emmy Rauch
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Yeah, I cross posted and still didnt get any info ;-( ... perhaps its not possible? That would be a sad day when you cant produce other tones out of a system speaker in java
 
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The big idea with Java is that it's platform-independent, isn't it? (rhetorical) Is it even possible to interface to the system speaker (or bleepy thing, whatever!) in a platform-independent way? Surely it would depend on the hardware you have installed. Given that, there would at least have to be some sort of consistent API on a given platform so that a native implementation could be built and accessed through JNI.

I don't really know enough about it, so maybe I should just shut up.

Jules
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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