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Q 4 H. Schildt (3): features v.s. JVM implementation dependence

 
blacksmith
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Dear author,

Some pre-Tiger Java features are platform dependent,
like the thread scheduler, etc.

Does the introduction of these new features make the
Java specifications more stringent for JVM vendors?

Cheers,

Gian Franco Casula
[ August 24, 2004: Message edited by: Gian Franco Casula ]
 
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Originally posted by Gian Franco Casula:
Does the introduction of these new features make the Java specifications more stringent for JVM vendors?



I'm not sure what you mean JVM vendors in your question... As far as I know, Sun is the only one organization, which is responsible for the release of the new JDK...

Will Sun make the new JLS and JVMS more stringent for itself? Correct me, if I am wrong about it...
 
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Sometimes, for performance issues or something special to their own applications or servers, vendors will implement their own JVM, like Microsoft and IBM.

Nick
 
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[GFC]: Does the introduction of these new features make the
Java specifications more stringent for JVM vendors?


For the most part, no. Most of the new features have nothing to do with the JVM; they are mostly implemented by the compiler. I believe there are some required changes to the JVM, like modifications to the class file format, and I think erasure is probably handled at runtime. But in general, I don't think JVM vendors will have too hard a time with the new features. At least, not compared to IDE vendors.

[KKN]: As far as I know, Sun is the only one organization, which is responsible for the release of the new JDK...

Errr, no. Sun is the primary source of java compilers and JVMs, but not the only one. Sun makes JDKs for Windows, Solaris, and Linux. If you run Java on some other platform, e.g. Mac or HP-UX or whatever, you're using a compiler and JVM created by someone else. In many cases I think the code may be extensively adapted from Sun source. But Sun doesn't take responsibility for adapting each JDK to every platform out there. They let the other platform vendors do that. E.g. if you're running HP-UX, you'll probably get a JDK developed by Hewlett-Packard. Furthermore, even for Windows and Linux, there are other compilers, and other JDKs. Perhaps the best-known other compiler is Jikes, originally developed by IBM. As for JVMs - well I haven't paid that much attention to what's available here. But one that comes to mind right away is Microsoft, since that's one of the legal issues Sun and Microsoft were fighting over.
 
Ko Ko Naing
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Originally posted by Jim Yingst:
But Sun doesn't take responsibility for adapting each JDK to every platform out there. They let the other platform vendors do that. E.g. if you're running HP-UX, you'll probably get a JDK developed by Hewlett-Packard. Furthermore, even for Windows and Linux, there are other compilers, and other JDKs. Perhaps the best-known other compiler is Jikes, originally developed by IBM.



How can the other vendors developed a JDK for their own platform? Does Sun provide a guidance to develop them? ASAIK, Java is not yet open sourced...

I'm lack of knowledge in this area... :roll:

Any comment and info are welcome....Thanks...
 
Jim Yingst
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[KKN]: Does Sun provide a guidance to develop them?

Yes. E.g. see http://java.sun.com/developer/products/java2cs/ .

ASAIK, Java is not yet open sourced...

It's not licensed under a standard open source license like GPL. But a lot of the source is available for reference. Sun wants Java development tools to exist on all platforms - they just don't have the resources to do it all themselves.
 
Ko Ko Naing
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Originally posted by Jim Yingst:
Yes. E.g. see http://java.sun.com/developer/products/java2cs/ .

It's not licensed under a standard open source license like GPL. But a lot of the source is available for reference. Sun wants Java development tools to exist on all platforms - they just don't have the resources to do it all themselves.



Thanks for the link... I found good info in the link about the license...

Sun is making the Java 2 SDK, Standard Edition source code available to the developer community as part of Sun's Community Source License Program.



So it's called Sun's Community Source License and I got the idea that it's not open source license like GPL... but I heard about the news, probably rumours, that Sun will open source its Java... Well we need to wait and see if it will happen..
 
He was expelled for perverse baking experiments. This tiny ad is a model student:
Java file APIs (DOC, XLS, PDF, and many more)
https://products.aspose.com/total/java
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