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Art of computer programming

 
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Recently on recommendation by ex professor, I bought book titled "Art of computer programming Part I:fundamental Algorithms"Book is too mathematical and contains author's assembly language called "MIX".I was about to purchase other 2 volumes, but book shopper told that those who purchase 3 volume almost return Part II and Part III immediately On Amazon book has mixed reviews.I was even told that these books are one of the best books on computer science.
Any Java Rancher who have read(or atleast tried to read ) any of the part I/II/III?
 
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I have the book ... volume one ...
The book is interesting reading ... though I read the algorithms and not the MIX source code
 
Pradip Bhat
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Part II seems to contain numerical Algorithms(Random Number Generation)and part III contains Searching/Sorting.I am also thinking about buying 'programming in C(fundamentals/sorting/searching/)'by Robert Sedgewick.
In today's world of 'E commerce' and 'SOAP/Web service' how much of the above books will be useful is a question
 
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I have a friend who has these & have a we have very different opinions.
My opinion is somthing like this.
I will NEVER EVER write/maintain a sorting algorithm at work so do not need a book telling me how to write one.
I do need to know the difference (time complexity/size/application) between b-tree and bitmap indexes.
If I cared so much about generating a random number I would use something other than a CPU. Hangon, have I ever used random numbers for anything? No
Like you say, if you want to read something that you will find usefull in the real world look elsewhere, otherwise you will be filling your brain with redundant Mb.
 
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My opinion is ,If you want to build some system/product from scratch , you will require these books.TAOCP were written in late 60s and early 70s when critical systems,softwares were written and majority of programmers were physicists/mathematicians.Situation changed gradually in 80s,and drastically in 90s when Applications servers,OOP languages,GUI env. evolved, so there was no 'real need' of these books in daily programming life.
 
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The title refers to the 'Art' rather than the practice of everyday programming. If you're only interested in getting things done, these are not directly useful books.
If you want to become a better programmer, those books are indispensable.
 
SJ Adnams
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No, theory_boy is right. These books are very much 'of a time', and that 'time' has most certainly ended.
 
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Originally posted by Simon Lee:
No, theory_boy is right. These books are very much 'of a time', and that 'time' has most certainly ended.


Hmm.
Go tell that to a bunch of Linux kernel hackers and Im sure they'll offer a counter point.
I guess though it really depends on what kind of application that you are working on. If all you write are the kind of applications that read from a database, present it, change a bit of information and then write it back to the database, then yes, perhaps you dont need such a book.
However if you are doing something that is manipulating data or data structures in a complicated way then these kind of books are useful.
But to simply write off these books as wholly irrelevant is, in my opinion, rather premature.

I noticed in the Bunkhouse there was only one book on implementing Algorithms in Java... could anyone out there recommend other books as alternative choices?
Best Regards,
Mark
 
Michael Ernest
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Originally posted by Simon Lee:
No, theory_boy is right. These books are very much 'of a time', and that 'time' has most certainly ended.


I notice today on Amazon, the sales ranking for the three volumes is 7.923. Not bad for a dead horse. 30 reviews, average rating 4-1/2 stars. List price $150, lowest used price $135.
Theory_boy et al may be right, but the market seems to disagree with them.
 
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Here is a really good book on algorithms - it's got great coverage, and it's current. Used as a textbook at MIT and a few other places.
Introduction to Algorithms - by Cormen, Leiserson, Rivest, Stein.
PS. Howdy Ranch!
 
Pradip Bhat
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yes, This book looks great among all Data Structures books and variety of topics from Sorting-Number theory-computational geometry-dynamic programming,enough material.Advantage is, authors have not used any programming language.They use pseudo code and language is precise unlike many authors who claim of writing Algorithm books
 
SJ Adnams
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I think we need to seperate the 'theory' with the 'practice' in this discussion.
If you want to read a book explaining how things are done 'under the bonnet' then these books may be an interesting read. However I really do think that these days everyone uses the 'reuse-buy-code' development methodology.
i.e. don't spend $$ developing/maintaining a linked list when you can pick one up off the shelf that HAS been tested.
Even more complex stuff has all been done before. Look at libraries like NAG and IMSOL, nobody goes off and writes themselves least squares solvers.
The only time these sorts of books are good is in interview situations. I had an interview where they asked me to write euclids GCD algorithm ( first page of algorithms in C++, a book which I do have).
As for sales ranking. Kyte's one-on-one oracle gets 5,343 whereas C.J.Date gets 1,958. However one-on-one oracle is going to be much better from a practical POV.
Simon
 
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