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Luchina

 
Leverager of our synergies
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Sorry for proprietary language
Did not know how to translate, and I do not trust dictionaries since lately... :roll:
"Luchina" is a piece of wood that people burn to light the house.
My mother told me that when she was a kid they used this kind of equipment for lighting, because they had no electricity.
I remember I wasn't too much impressed when she told me that (it was few years ago), but lately I recalled her memories and was striked by contrast... How can life change so much diring one generation lifetime? I asked her confirmation, and she said that this all is true - she does remember time when there was no other way to light the house besides burning a piece of
wood
Of course, she had to use E-mail to say all this... :roll:
 
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Believe it or not, in my earliest years, growing up in rural north-east Texas, we had neither electricity nor indoor plumbing (we were lucky enough to have a deluxe two-seater!). Light came from a kerosene lamp, and as you said, heat from wood. We learned to split wood in two varieties: stove wood (for cooking) and fire wood for heat. We had to go out to the well (which my grandfather and others had dug by hand) and "fetch" a bucket of water by lowering a bucket into the well and then retrieving it. Living is so much easier today, but sometimes, I wonder if modern convenience outweighs our lost simplicity.
Michael Morris
[ August 18, 2002: Message edited by: Michael Morris ]
 
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May I know how old you are?
 
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Luchina is actually a popular last name. So perhaps they are all of Russian origin?
Speaking of not having electricity, my native village in India got electrified only as recently as 1985. I still remember during my visits there, the only sources of light were kerosene lamps. We did have flashlights All cooking was done using chopped firewood, and dried coconut shells as fuel - it had a unique flavour to it which I liked.
(Btw, we still don't have a phone line in the village. Maybe in a couple years... )
 
whippersnapper
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OK, I'll bite.
Map writes:
I do not trust dictionaries since lately...

Care to explain why not?
(Two out of the first three I consulted gave me what I needed to know.)
"Luchina" is a piece of wood that people burn to light the house...<snip>..Did not know how to translate
The only R-E dictionary I have handy is the first edition (1984) of Katzner.
luchina n[oun]. thin stick; sliver ([/i]of kindling wood[/i]).
Well, that's pretty unsatisfying, given Map's more restrictive definition that says a defining characteristic is the use of the piece of wood to burn to provide light.
In general, one of the beauties of Katzner is that it claims almost complete reversibility. That is, if a word is translated in one direction, you'll find that same translation pair in the other half. Fails us here. "Luchina" doesn't appear in any of the possible translations of "stick" or "sliver" into Russian. (I have a list of these somewhere...) Anyhow I won't hold him too much at fault here, since he's provided what amounts more to an explanation than to a translation.
Anyhow, here's what we get from Ozhegov's 20th edition (1988):
luchina -y, zh[enskogo roda]., takzhe cobir[atel'noe]. Tonkaia dlinnaia shchepka. Pri cvete lychiny (ob osveshchenii takoi zazhzhennoi shchepkoi krest'ianskoi izby v stariny). || umen'sh[itel'noe] luchinka -y, zh[enskogo roda].
And from Ozhegov-Shvedova's first (1992):
luchina -y, zh[enskogo roda]., takzhe cobir[atel'noe]. Tonkaia dlinnaia shchepka ot sukhogo polena. Zasvetit' luchinu (v starinu: dlia osveshcheniia izby). || umen'sh[itel'noe] luchinka -y, zh[enskogo roda]. || umen'sh[itel'noe]-lask[atel'noe]. luchinushka -y, zh[enskogo roda]. (o luchine, osveshchaiushchei izbu.). || pril[agatel'noe]. luchinnyi, -aia, -oe.
I'll translate the dictionary entries.
Ozhegov:
luchina feminine noun. also used collectively. A long, thin sliver. By the light of a burning sliver of wood (said of illumination provided by a burning sliver of wood in a peasant hut in olden times). dimunitive form luchinka feminine noun.
Ozhegov-Shvedova:
luchina feminine noun. also used collectively. A long, thin sliver from a dry log. To light a sliver of wood. (in older times: for illuminating a peasant hut). || dimunitive form luchinka feminine noun. || diminutive-endearing form luchinushka feminine noun. || adjective luchinnyi.
So both give us essentially the same thing Map describes. Best you can do in English in running text without glossing an explanation is probably "burning sliver of wood." Should be clear from most contexts that the point of it is to provide light.
Regarding luchinushka, I believe this is the point at which Map is required to decry the English language because the best it can do to translate that one is "O my darlin' ittle-wittle spwinter of wood burning for lighty-wighty."
Of course, she had to use E-mail to say all this...
I know the correct Russian expression for "E-mail" but I always want it to be emal', which unfortunately already means "enamel."
Hmm. Wonder whether Ozhegov-Shvedova is stored electronically as SGML or in a relational database.
 
Mapraputa Is
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Care to explain why not?
Once upon a time Jason Menard said:
"From what I understand, Russia's education system rivals anything in the West. "
The only translation of "rival" my dictionary provided me with was from "opponent" semantic field. So I composed a damn cool response with proper debunking, added disguised insults, subtle insinuations etc. and then JR member # 290 pointed out that I simply misunderstood the word. Prety frustrating experience.
I know, it is not the best dictionary, but it is one I have within a click, so...
Another reason, to check "English-to-Russian" translations I can use any good dictionary, for "Russian-to-English" I have to use bilingual dictionaries and they suck.
Ozhegov online
luchina:
1. splinter, chip;
2. torch.
- neither of them apparently maps to what I mean precisely.
Two out of the first three I consulted gave me what I needed to know.
You are probably speaking about "learnt-to-native language" translation? It doesn't work other way around.
Luchina" doesn't appear in any of the possible translations of "stick" or "sliver" into Russian.
I got "splinter" translated back as "luchina" but the fact "splinter" never appeared in your list worries me
I know the correct Russian expression for "E-mail" but I always want it to be emal', which unfortunately already means "enamel."
Ironically, slang for "E-mail" is "mylo" which means "soap". Considering ongoing soapization of the Internet, we have a clash of concepts.
Hmm. Wonder whether Ozhegov-Shvedova is stored electronically as SGML or in a relational database.
I surmise Russia relational databases are far more mainstream engines than SGML tools in Russia.
 
Wanderer
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then JR member # 290 pointed out
I am not a number! I am a human being!
Plus, we'll eventually need a UBB/Jive translation table to understand posts like this once we convert to Jive.
 
Mapraputa Is
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Hey, what do you mean, JR member # 290? Jive will not keep our numbers? How can we establish proper social hierarchy then? Now by looking at the numbers I can always tell who is a veteran here and who... Um... changed his identity lately
"I am not a number! I am a human being!" - and what made you think so?
 
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... resitance is futile, you will be assimilated
 
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I used luchina to light fire at my dacha...ok, let me rephrase, I used thin sticks of wood to light fire at my summer house to make food, back in R, because we had no electricity...becuase it took 2 years to get it in....
From JavaRanch server point of view, you guys all isomorphed to numbers...
Map, how do I supose we translate "Eh, dubinushka, uhnem"?
Shura
 
Michael Morris
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Originially posted by Jaswant Dring:
May I know how old you are?


If you're addressing that question to me, I'm 49. The REA (Rural Electrification Association) did not finish wiring up NE Texas until the mid '60s.
Michael Morris
[ August 19, 2002: Message edited by: Michael Morris ]
 
Mapraputa Is
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Map, how do I supose we translate "Eh, dubinushka, uhnem"?
[Map scratches her head]
"Ladies and gentlemen, let's go to the business..."
Where is Michael Matola, by the way?
 
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