• Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic

J2EE technologies/strategys  RSS feed

 
Dave Brown
Ranch Hand
Posts: 301
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Hi all,

Does anyone know a good resource out there that outlines what J2EE frameworks & strategys are more suited to certain scenario's?

I have done a handfull of J2EE applications now, using simply servlets and jsp's & javabeans and have been more than happy with the results. I've briefly looked into Struts & Tapestry/HIbernate but decided to develope using servelets a jsp's first gaining a bit of experience before moving onto frameworks.

And where does EJB come into the equation ? I am going to embark converting an old project into a J2EE app which will have many different modules and aspects to it. It seems most large scale project make use of Enterprise Java Beans, but at the moment I can actually see myself quite happily coding away a large project using servlets/jsps/javabeans as I have already.

So what I'm really looking for I guess is a resource that outlines under what circumstances these technologies really pay off to use, EJB etc..

Thanks for your time anyone who answers ;-)

Dave.
 
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal
Posts: 66306
152
IntelliJ IDE Java jQuery Mac Mac OS X
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
I've worked on a number of large-scale projects and no team that I have ever been on ever deemed EJB's necessary. YMMV.

I'm not saying that EJB's are never appropriate for large-scale projects, but they're certainly not always appropriate.
 
Stan James
(instanceof Sidekick)
Ranch Hand
Posts: 8791
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
EJB containers provide a number of services and features ... remote access, transactions, security, stateful sessions, persistence, scalability and more. Find a book with a comprehensive list and compare your app needs to the list. Frankly most apps don't get many hits. You can do all of those things yourself and various alternative frameworks do more or fewer of them for you. My company decided to use EJB everywhere and there are several apps like ours that have one public session bean and a proprietary framework behind that. So much for standards!
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
author & internet detective
Marshal
Posts: 37469
539
Eclipse IDE Java VI Editor
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
Dave,
We too use session beans in all our apps. They provide security and transaction support which is very valuable. Entity beans are sometimes useful and sometimes/often overkill.

Bear,
What does YMMV mean?
 
Bear Bibeault
Author and ninkuma
Marshal
Posts: 66306
152
IntelliJ IDE Java jQuery Mac Mac OS X
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
YMMV = Your mileage may vary.
 
Chris Johnston
Ranch Hand
Posts: 85
  • Mark post as helpful
  • send pies
  • Quote
  • Report post to moderator
If you are looking to learn J2EE and don't mind reading off a computer monitor, then I highly advice you go to The Server Side and download the free version of Mastering Enterprise JavaBeans[1]. This is an excellent introduction to the world of EJB's in all their different forms.

As far as my experience goes, I have been involved in several projects where session beans have been used, but I have yet to be directly involved with a project where entity beans were used.

If you are looking at entity beans, I would suggest that you check out at least one framework -- Hibernate. An excellent replacement for entity beans that makes coding enterprise applications a lot easier. (Mind you, straight JDBC is probably easier to program then CMP.)

[1] http://www.theserverside.com/books/wiley/masteringEJB/index.tss
 
  • Post Reply Bookmark Topic Watch Topic
  • New Topic
Boost this thread!