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chainsaws

 
Trailboss
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I've learned a mountain about chainsaws in the last few weeks.
Last year we tried to heat the house with wood, but we burned it as fast as we could get it in.
This year we are a little better prepared. We figure we need six cords to make it through winter. We have two cords chopped and stacked now. We also have four cords of huge logs waiting for processing.
I made a sawbuck and it turns out to work pretty good.
 
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What is a sawbuck?
 
Ranch Hand
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Who needs chainsaws when you have smart rednecks.
 
paul wheaton
Trailboss
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A sawbuck is kinda like a saw horse. It holds a log up in the air so you can saw it into shorter pieces without having your chain touch the ground.
 
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(Chain) saws are indeed nice tools if you need them.
I've owned several, used a bunch more over the years.
You can spend minimal ($100) on an old Mac or a new Poulan, and get almost the same bang for your buck as a $300-400 Stihl or Husqvarna.
Whatever you've got, just take time to keep it clean, keep the chain tensioned properly, and make sure you flip the bar every gas tank or 2.
One of the big deals to me is if you have (or not) an automatic oiler. I much prefer them to a manual push for oil, but they frequently dump too much oil to the bar/chain.
Keep two chains, and rotate them frequently. Learn how to sharpen them yourself.
In non-emergency mode, practise what happens if the saw kicks back hard and you have to lean into the chain brake to stop it.
Have fun, work hard.
Guy
 
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Originally posted by Paul Wheaton:
I've learned a mountain about chainsaws in the last few weeks.
Last year we tried to heat the house with wood, but we burned it as fast as we could get it in.
This year we are a little better prepared. We figure we need six cords to make it through winter. We have two cords chopped and stacked now. We also have four cords of huge logs waiting for processing.
I made a sawbuck and it turns out to work pretty good.


Remember you always cut wood one full year before you use it..
Otherwise you end up with buring green wood and house burning down..
cityslicksers..shakews head..
 
paul wheaton
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I bought a stihl 025 last year. I'm getting the hang of using it.
And I bought my sun a cheap electic for his 11th birthday. ("Wudjya get for your birthday?" - "a chainsaw!")
The electic did not have an auto oiler. What a hassle. So we upgraded and got one that did. I now like the electric more than the stihl.
We bring the logs to the house. So we use the electric about five times more than the stihl.
There are some log piles that were cut a year or two ago and we're working that over first. We're also working over some snags that are too small to support wildlife.
 
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