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java problem

 
Greenhorn
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Emploee should implement the Comparable interface. Then in the compareTo method, you can write specific code to test for whatever field you are going to use to compare 2 objects. This is the way it is generally done.

Using TheSamaEmployer method will work, and is similar to using Comparable, but is not as self documenting.

Calling it is just like calling any other method. e.TheSamaEmployer(Some other Employee object reference).

You need to decide which member to use to test. SInce they are both Strings, you will use one of several String methods to compare them. If all you need is equals or not, then equals() or equalsIgnoreCase is the way to go. If you are going to need to sort them, the compareTo method in String is what you need.
[ September 06, 2006: Message edited by: Rusty Shackleford ]
 
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Originally posted by peterx peter:




Please visit , http://faq.javaranch.com/view?HowToAskQuestionsOnJavaRanch
 
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