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What should I say while leaving for the day?

 
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I used to work in India before I started my first job in USA recently. In india we greet each other in mornings, by saying "good-morning" and "bye" or "good night" while leaving for the day.
Likewise I wish my co-workers "good-morning" when I come in and "good-night" or "bye" when I leave for the day. They are really nice people. They always wish me back by saying "good-morning" or "good night", but never saying "bye".
This made me think that is saying "Bye" is rude here in USA? Or dose it mean something else than what I think? I dont want to offend anybody or I dont want them to mean something else, I just want to wish them properly while leaving. Any suggestions??
 
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I know sometimes I don't say bye when leaving work, so that I may get out under the radar. There is certainly nothing wrong with saying bye and I am sure that your coworkers will gain respect for you for your politeness and consideration.
 
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This made me think that is saying "Bye" is rude here in USA?


I don't think so. "Bye" is just an informal "goodbye", -- Americans like it short. However, if you become the president of the United States, you probably don't want to finish your speech by saying "... And we will prevail. God bless America. Bye".
Eugene.
 
Mark D'soza
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Thanks Michael and Eugene,
I really appreciate your comments.
 
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My thought on this is that "Bye" or "Goodbye" seems somewhat more permanent than "Good night". "Good night" leaves you with a "see you tomorrow" kind of feeling.
Just my opinion...
 
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I agree with Elaine (and Eugene and Michael). No one's going to think you're rude for saying "bye", it's just a little bit out of place. "Good night" is short for "have a good night", with the assumption that you don't need to refer to anything beyond that because you'll see them the next day. Note that as people leave on Friday evening you'll probably hear "have a nice weekend" rather than "good night".
Also kind of strange is that, even though you're probably leaving in the evening rather than night, we say "good night" when leaving - because "good evening" is used as a greeting. The assumption is that you'll still be able to say "good night" later when you leave. Or "good morning" if you don't.
[ April 14, 2003: Message edited by: Jim Yingst ]
 
Gail Schlentz
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... and who says the English language is difficult to learn!!!

Good Bye!
...I mean Good Night!
...no... I mean .... uhh - See ya later!!
 
mister krabs
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Or be like Tigger and just say TTFN (ta-ta for now).
 
John Smith
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I had a similar problem with the colloquial English when I came to US. It took me some time to understand that when people who are passing by and ask you "How are you doing?", "How is it going?", or "What's up?", it's not really that they are asking a question or care to know the answer. Rather, it's just an informal way of greeting, no different from "Hi" or "Hello". Actually, after 10 years in US, I am not sure that I understood the difference completely. Can someone explain?
Eugene.
 
Mark D'soza
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Same here.
When somebody asks "how are you doing?", I should say only "fine, thank you" or I should also ask him/her "how are u?"
 
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Originally posted by Mark D'soza:
Same here.
When somebody asks "how are you doing?", I should say only "fine, thank you" or I should also ask him/her "how are u?"


Neither choice would be a mistake. After answering "fine, thank you", it is slightly more polite and preferred to also ask how the other person is doing.
 
John Smith
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The Eskimos have a few dozen words refering to "snow". Because "being nice" is so important and fundamental in American culture, the expressions such as "What's up" and "How's it going" serve as the shades of the same meaning as a simple "Hello" in America. How's that for a theory?
In Russia, if you ask someone "How are you?", he will stop walking, and he will tell you about all his deseases, shortage of money, the problems with kids, the bad boss, and the current political situation. In America, you just cheerfully reply "Good. How are you." End of conversation.
Eugene.
 
frank davis
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Originally posted by Eugene Kononov:
I had a similar problem with the colloquial English when I came to US. It took me some time to understand that when people who are passing by and ask you "How are you doing?", "How is it going?", or "What's up?", it's not really that they are asking a question or care to know the answer. Rather, it's just an informal way of greeting, no different from "Hi" or "Hello". Actually, after 10 years in US, I am not sure that I understood the difference completely. Can someone explain?
Eugene.


I think you got it, they're all basically polite ways of greeting someone, but also a way to start a conversation depending on how you wish to respond. Most of the time people don't want to hear a long explanation or have a conversation, so you have to judge the environment/situation/context and person asking the question. It is possible your friends could use those same words to inquire on how you really are doing. "How are you doing?" seems to put slightly more emphasis on "you" and your personal condition and a friend may actually mean his/her concern with using those words. But the same words could be used as a simple "Hi" also by others such as co-workers. The other terms are less personal and would refer to conditions external; not your feelings or bodily pains, but maybe your job, your hobbies, your business deals, etc.
 
Jim Yingst
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Yeah -by default, assume that no, the person who asks you "how are you?" doesn't necessarily care; they're probably just being polite. However they may be interested. You can always say something a little bit distinctive instead of "fine", such as "really well", "very busy", "tired", "life sucks", or whatever, depending on your mood. Then if the other person cares and has time, they may choose to ask follow-up questions, and conversation may proceed from there. But don't expect this, or think someone dislikes you because they didn't follow up - most of the time it doesn't mean anything.
 
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I heard that on road anyone can ask "How are you doing?" in US.
My friends were surprised first, why this guy is asking me "How are you doing"?,when I dont know him.
 
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hi Jim
the person who asks you "how are you"
My default answer is
I am top of the world
And I :roll: think :roll: The Moose default answer
Lurk!
 
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Originally posted by Ravish Kumar:
I heard that on road anyone can ask "How are you doing?" in US.
My friends were surprised first, why this guy is asking me "How are you doing"?,when I dont know him.


Courtesy is an obligation, friendship a gift.
I dont really sit and analyze it when a person asks me "How are you doing?", I just assume that they're being friendly. I just automatically respond "Fine thanks. And you?". Its just being courteous.
Cheers,
Mark
 
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Actually, after 10 years in US, I am not sure that I understood the difference completely. Can someone explain?
Eugene.


How do you do?
Fits into this thread real well, and the proper answer answer is How do you do?
If someone could explain this to me, I'll be grateful and impressed...
I think when you're going home you should say
I'll be back.
with an Arnold Schwartzennager accent. That leaves them wondering and works real well when you skip out early.
[ April 15, 2003: Message edited by: Rufus BugleWeed ]
 
Thomas Paul
mister krabs
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The proper response to "How do you do?" is "How do I do what?"
 
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Two optons:
1. Put your jacket on, grab the arse of the cute photocopy girl and give her a lingering kiss, fling open the office door and shout, "see you later losers, I'm outta here!"
2. Or do what I do: scream in frustration, slam your keyboard on the desk a few times and shout "F*uck this, I'm off home". Then storm out forgetting your coat so you have to come back really quietly and hope no one notices.
 
Jim Yingst
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The proper response to "How do you do?" is "How do I do what?
Or "do who"?
 
Mark Fletcher
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Originally posted by Richard Hawkes:

2. Or do what I do: scream in frustration, slam your keyboard on the desk a few times and shout "F*uck this, I'm off home". Then storm out forgetting your coat so you have to come back really quietly and hope no one notices.


I do this one every day. The key is to being so angry with that crazed "Ive got a crossbow and I aint afraid to use it look" that theyre too scared to sack you the next day
 
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I talk to my US collegues over phone and they do say "bye" at the end before I do it. So I guess it should be OK to say bye.
My collegue starts by saying "How are you doing?" . I say "Pretty good. How about you?"
Then they ask me "What is up ? "
What do I say now ?
 
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Its easy: Are you out tonight? Good, good, See you in ____ ( name of the pub) !!
 
kapil kumar
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Was this meant for me?

Originally posted by Ashok Krishnan:
Its easy: Are you out tonight? Good, good, See you in ____ ( name of the pub) !!

 
kapil kumar
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I am in India.
 
Ashok Mash
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Originally posted by kapil kumar:
I am in India.


Sorry Kapil, I was responding to the OP.
In your case, you should tell them if there is something interesting - like kudi next door was hitting on you, or how good is the new version of XYZ that you just finished installing.
Okay, well, not really, I guess you should tell them either 'Nothing much really' and ask him back 'any crack/news there?' - laugh, or 'Oh, hell mate, really, ..' and go one whining about it! But don't forget to laugh!! Be positive!!
Okay, enough of this blunder, may be someone else will help you in here!
 
Thomas Paul
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If you call someone and after the basic small talk they say "What's up?" they are asking you, "Why did you call me?"
 
John Smith
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Another ambiguous colloquial English expression is "You are welcome". When I took the "English As a Second Language" courses in Russia, the class instructor told us, "When you visit a doctor in America and he treats your broken arm, you say 'thank you', and the doctor will reply, 'you are welcome'".
In Russia, the "you are welcome" from a doctor is completely inappropriate, -- it sounds like "I wish you have more problems and come to my office so that I can make a few bucks". In America, the "you are welcome" is something else.
 
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Originally posted by Eugene Kononov:
In Russia, the "you are welcome" from a doctor is completely inappropriate, -- it sounds like "I wish you have more problems and come to my office so that I can make a few bucks". In America, the "you are welcome" is something else.


I think your Russian definition closer to the truth... :roll:
 
Richard Hawkes
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Originally posted by Mark Fletcher:
I do this one every day. The key is to being so angry with that crazed "Ive got a crossbow and I aint afraid to use it look" that theyre too scared to sack you the next day


"Back off man!! No one's getting between me and that door you hear me?! I said back off! I've got a Palm Pilot! I mean it man, don't make me use it!!"
That should stop you getting all the lame projects
 
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Originally posted by Eugene Kononov:
I had a similar problem with the colloquial English when I came to US. It took me some time to understand that when people who are passing by and ask you "How are you doing?", "How is it going?", or "What's up?", it's not really that they are asking a question or care to know the answer. Rather, it's just an informal way of greeting, no different from "Hi" or "Hello". Actually, after 10 years in US, I am not sure that I understood the difference completely. Can someone explain?
Eugene.


True confession :
I was born in the US and every once in a while when someone asks me any of those questions I'll semi-involuntarily go into a Deep Think and ponder how I am actually doing short term, long term, my place in the Universe, etc. Needless to say, a delay of more than a few seconds sometimes irritates the questioner...
 
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One thing I learnt, there is low tolerance for unknown in American culture. To make your interlocutor happy, it's important to keep rapport by constantly reporting how are you, how do you feel, how is your dinner etc. So when somebody asks, "How are you?" I answer, "let me think about it", and only after that I go into Deep Think. This way people know what's going on and can wait, while I ponder how I am actually doing short term, long term, my place in the Universe, until I calculate weighted scores and map them to one-dimensional "horrible - ... - great" scale.
[ April 16, 2003: Message edited by: Mapraputa Is ]
 
Rufus BugleWeed
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There's an unwritten rule. I think it comes from How to Win Friends and Influence People. It goes like this - Begin in a Friendly Way.
So when somebody shows up at your desk and starts with, "Why do I get this stack trace every time I click the mouse, you mindless moron???" Things never go well. At least not at my desk.
When they show up with "Hi, I really liked the way you did your bald head today. How's things going?" You have a chance to say poorly we loaded the new classes from Mr. Bluckeey and now I've found a I missed a catch and I'm working on a work around. I really busy cause people are going to be here in a moment with their Palm Pilots. Is there a chance you could come by later because you are not going to believe what I heard about Bluckeey and your ex-wife? Cheers."
 
Anonymous
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Originally posted by Mapraputa Is:
One thing I learnt, there is low tolerance for unknown in American culture. To make your interlocutor happy, it's important to keep rapport by constantly reporting how are you, how do you feel, how is your dinner etc. So when somebody asks, "How are you?" I answer, "let me think about it", and only after that I go into Deep Think. This way people know what's going on and can wait, while I ponder how I am actually doing short term, long term, my place in the Universe, until I calculate weighted scores and map them to one-dimensional "horrible - ... - great" scale.
[ April 16, 2003: Message edited by: Mapraputa Is ]


Map and I agree!
The user interface (my blank face) does not give the user feedback that his request is being processed, whereas your comment does. Sort of like a status bar at least in terms of letting the user know the request was acknowledged and will be processed.
 
R K Singh
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Originally posted by Mark Fletcher:

Courtesy is an obligation, friendship a gift.


I have not been in US.
I dont know what will be my reaction, when someone whom I dont know, who is just passing by on the road smiles and ask me "How am I doing".
Really nothing wrong in it. and actually its good.
I dont know what will happen 'here' if I great/ask someone on the road whom I dont know.
[ April 17, 2003: Message edited by: Ravish Kumar ]
 
Mark D'soza
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May be people will look at you suspeciously. May be somebody will ask you are you alright? And if you do this with one of the preety girls down the street, there are fair chances that you will get a slap.
 
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