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How to use ArrayList in jdk1.5

 
Pal Amutha
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import java.util.*;

public class myarraylist {

public static void main(String args[])
{
ArrayList ob1=new ArrayList();
//ArrayList<Alphabet> v=new ArrayList<Alphabet>();
v.add("A");
v.add("B");
System.out.println(v);

}
}

In the above code , it gives warning message.
I refer through net. They used generic. see the comment line.
they mentioned like this way.

the general syntax is :
ArrayList<E> object=new ArrayList<E>();
here , what is E denote. Please explain it
 
Kaydell Leavitt
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Welcome Pal Amutha,

Where is the class: Alphabet defined?
 
Henry Wong
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Even if the Alphabet class is defined somewhere, it is moot. The example uses String objects, not Alphabet objects.

Henry
 
Raghavan Muthu
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Yes, that is true. As Henry said, the actual type being provided is of type String. So no matter what class you gave, it will complain because of a type mismatch.
 
Raghavan Muthu
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Originally posted by Pal Amutha:
here , what is E denote.


E denotes an Element, as a general shortcut they represent it in a single letter in caps. K for key, V for value etc.,
 
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