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Extreme Programming in Russian

 
Leverager of our synergies
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I *thought* they would translate "Extreme Programming" as "Extremalnoe Programmirovanie" and of course, they did!
Am I totally wrong, or "Extreme" in English has so many meanings, submeanings, connotations, overtones and God knows what else, while "Extremalnoe" in Russian will only make you scratch your head and wonder what the heck it is?
If I first heard about Extreme Programming in Russian, I would have no clue what it is.
Can American people make some meaningful conclusion what Extreme Programming is, if they do not know anything about it, just a name? Is there some emotional value in this name, is "extreme" good, or is it emotionally neutral?
[ May 04, 2003: Message edited by: Mapraputa Is ]
 
mister krabs
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"Extreme sports" are those that are unusually dangerous. To me, "extreme" in the way it is used implies a sense of danger which I don't think the XP people really wanted. I recall once suggesting to a director that we might want to look into "extreme programming" and he told me that he thought our programming was already extreme enough.
 
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Map,
The name "Extreme Programming" didn't give me any clues about that development process. The name just created images of a guy that likes to develop code when he is not riding a skateboard or participating in a streetluge competition. From 1997 to 1999 I managed a software department that used extreme programming methods but I did not connect what we were doing to the label "extreme programming" until recently when I read something on the subject on the web. In my opinion, the name isn't helping the methodology.
 
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My european ears do not like the word neither.
The term is from boom time.
Someone should rename it to
"Immediate ROI Control Programming"
 
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"Extreme Programming" translates to Russian as "My comrade is typing, and I am watching him very closely".
 
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"Extreme Programming" translates to Russian as "My comrade is typing, and I am watching him very closely".
Funny, but that is also the way a Texan like me interprets it or similarly like "This dude is breathing down my collar while I'm trying to get some work done." I'm far from being convinced that it is a worthwhile methodology. Refactoring legacy code is certainly a great idea, but it seems to me that pair programming is a waste of resources. Put plenty of time up front in your design, break the components up into bitesize chunks, assign the development of those chunks based on each developer's talents, and unit test everything. I really think that good OO analysis and design should eliminate most of the problems developers encounter when creating a system.
 
Dan Chisholm
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Originally posted by Michael Morris:
Funny, but that is also the way a Texan like me interprets it or similarly like "This dude is breathing down my collar while I'm trying to get some work done." I'm far from being convinced that it is a worthwhile methodology.


I found that having programmers working in pairs can be very effective when it is difficult to hire one person that has all of the required software development and domain knowledge. I once worked at a semiconductor equipment company where the time required to gain adequate domain knowledge was usually longer than the typical turn over rate for software engineers. As a result the software development department was usually staffed with incompetent programmers. When I was asked to build a software department within the field service department to act as a rapid response team to fix software bugs in the field and to develop new features requested by customers I used a team process similar to extreme programming. I hired entry level software engineers straight out of school and paired them with hardware technicians that I transferred out of the manufacturing department and the field service department. The software experts taught the machine experts how to write code and the machine experts trained the entry level software engineers on the hardware. Very quickly all of the engineers became far more productive than any of the more experienced software engineers in the development engineering department. Over time, as both halves of each team gained experienced the engineers started working separately.
On the other hand, studies have shown that working in groups has the potential to induce a
"social loafing" effect. I think that the productivity level achieved in a group is proportional to the level of information sharing that is required to accomplish the task. Once the engineers are trained then the advantage of working in pairs is reduced.
Extreme programming also involves the use of close interactions with the customer and the use of incremental software development that delivers software to the customer quickly. In the semiconductor equipment industry, a software bug can cause a customer to lose tens of thousands of dollars a day as a result of lost production. An incremental software release process can greatly reduce losses in comparison to a release processes that forces the customer to wait several months for a bug fix that is bundled into the next major code release.
I think that the concepts of extreme programming can be useful but not necessarily in every development situation.
 
Michael Morris
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DC: Extreme programming also involves the use of close interactions with the customer and the use of incremental software development that delivers software to the customer quickly.

This is something that I do agree with wholeheatedly. The problem always seems to come in when we just tell the customer what he wants to hear and worry about the consequences later. I can only have an opinion about Extreme programming since I have worked for the same small company for the last 22 years in which I am the Software department aside from one other employee that does some simple programming and takes care of the network, so you may want to assess that opinion with caution. But this particular concept is a good one in all fields of engineering, manufacturing or whatever that requires one group providing a service to another group. My company provides steel fabrication drawings for companies like Dow Chemical, Bayer, DuPont, etc. We always, without fail, get into scheduling trouble on any project. Why? Because we are the last step on the engineering rung before document completion for a project. And what is our modus operandi? Usually: Lie about it. Put off the ass-chewin' to the day of doom when the drawings don't arrive. That's not good policy, and if we didn't deliver near flawless drawings, well that's a scarey thought.
 
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