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Need for advice from experienced Java programmers...

 
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Greetings people!

Allow me to introduce myself (even it's quite unimportant :-)
Recently I have passed SCJP exam for Java 6, so I'm some kind of programmer :-)
Besides my SCJP degree (which represents certain level of java knowledge, used for realization of complex type problems-algorithms), I also knoe to parse XML (using DOM), the syntax of HTML/XHTML, and nowdays I refine my knowledge of Java Networking and JDBC.
The problem is, that after finishing that part of programming, I have no idea what else to upgrade to my java soil
I urgently need an advice-direction, in which I should move my programming indulging... I know There are plenty of frameworks, but I'm not familiar enough to them (they purpose at first place, each of them, their preponderance in the world of programming, etc...) There are also and GUI side of programs, which, on the other side, is maybe better solution?
However, to give the best answer on my question, I suppose that everyone who would like to help me, should conceive himself as myself, with described level of knowledge, and from yours experienced perspective direct my way of programming motion...
I know that this could be demanded question, but it is a cross-road, and the Big one for me, so I really appreciate any answer you give to me...
Best wishes for each of forum member, and
JAVA RULES ! ! ! :-D
 
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Welcome to JavaRanch.

It depends on what you want yourself, ofcourse. One thing you could do is learn about Java EE. Start with servlets and JSPs, and look at more advanced topics such as EJBs later.

You could have a look at the SCWCD (Sun Certified Web Component Developer) and SCBCD (Sun Certified Business Component Developer) exams; those are about servlets and JSPs, and EJBs respectively.
 
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Hi there and welcome to Javaranch!

It really depends on what aspect of Java you enjoy working on and want to begin your career in!

If you not GUI focused then many developers these days pick up Hibernate and Spring as industry standard tools (EJB3.0 is also fairly popular). If you are GUI focused then to be honest you have lots of choice with seemingly no dominate standard (You have JSP/JSF/Servlet/AJAX a whole host of frameworks....).

Hope that helps a little!
 
Goran Markovic
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Of course it's helpful, just as any data in the world is
I'll be very thankful if anyone of you describe me the practical use of, let's say Hibernate-Spring (as I conclude these two going in the package together), or Struts?
Does knowledge of these frameworks comprehends knowing of JSP,JSF...?
I believe that answers of those question could be wide that simple topic question area, but I need just an outline of it.

Greets!
 
Martijn Verburg
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Originally posted by Slobodan Erakovic:
Of course it's helpful, just as any data in the world is
I'll be very thankful if anyone of you describe me the practical use of, let's say Hibernate-Spring (as I conclude these two going in the package together), or Struts?
Does knowledge of these frameworks comprehends knowing of JSP,JSF...?
I believe that answers of those question could be wide that simple topic question area, but I need just an outline of it.
Greets!



* Well Hibernate is a Data Mapping Tool/Framework that helps you map Java Objects to database tables. It is pretty powerful (can handle inheritance, interfaces, CRUD operations, has it's on type of query language etc, txn support etc). It is considered one of the major defacto standards for data persistence in Java

* Spring is a collection of frameworks and APIs that was born out of some of the frustrations and lack of flexibility in the J2EE specifications. It's too big a topic to detail here (suffice to say you can do just about anything with some sort of spring component these days) and again it is considered a major defacto standard.

** The very latest versions of J2EE (now called JEE) address many of the old J2EE problems and so you'll find there are plenty of people who use EJB3.0, servlet etc without Spring and sometimes with Spring.

* Struts is an older but well established MVC framework for JSP/Servlet development, it's worth at least skimming over this as there are plenty of struts jobs out there (but it is not a 'new and exciting tech').

* Parts of Spring and most of Struts are there for JSP/JSF development (not so much for JSF IMHO)

JEE/Java is a _massive_ area to cover and you'll never cover it all. If you want a good grounding though I think you can take Jespers advice above

Hope that helps a little!
 
Goran Markovic
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Well, thank You a lot Martijn, for explanations. There rest is on me to figure out what is the best way to continue. One more thing, may I hear Your personal opinion about which is the best way to go for young java programmer?(comprehending the volume of knowledge programmer must learn and effort it invest, nowdays job market about particular java developer, ... and so on...)

Thank You one more time!
 
Martijn Verburg
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Best way to go? Is to code, code, code. Make sure you find a job that will involve lots of coding (and/or do coding on an open source project). Many jobs for juniors will have you testing or writing documentation or performing non coding tasks. Some of that stuff is all good and useful, but you really want to start out by doing lots of programming . If possible find a job that offers mentoring (e.g. There is a senior person who will help you learn good habits).
 
Goran Markovic
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well, however, thank You a lot!
see ya, around...
 
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