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How do you call your pet?

 
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Do they have human names or not? Most people I knew in Russia gave pet human names, so I wonder how it is in other parts of the world...
Also, there are "default" names for cats and dogs. If people do not know cat's name they call him "Vas'ka" (' sign is used to mark that "s" sound is soft, but this isn't that important) which is a male name Dogs are often called "Sharik", which isn't a human name, it means "small ball". Hm... This means that for in Russian lingual image of the universe cats are more human than dogs. I bet it's because cats used to sleep inside the house and dogs outside - protecting the place from enemies. And this is all the gratitude they earned?
Initially I was thinking about human names, how they were made. Most I know are of Greek or Latin or some other antic origin, and they did have some meaning in those languages, it's only later they started to serve as human names and now most people do not even know what they mean. I thought how it happened, that people moved from giving their child "meaningful" names (which practice still probably exists in some countries, I do not know) to choosing from a fairly restricted set of "meaningless" names. My guess is that people liked to name their kids after some relative, grandfather or whomever else, and finally this process ended in where it ended.
There is some mystery in how pet's names are chosen. Unlike with kids, you do not have to give a name right after you got a namenee, you can wait. Our first cat, we tried to call her " fluffy" or something stupid like that and finally she turned out to be "Larisa". No idea how come this name fit her so well. When we got our second cat, we were more smart already and did not call him any stupid name, but waited, until it would naturally come. One day Mom called him "Petr" and it was decided once and forever. Somehow it was clear that he cannot be anything but Petr.
 
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Originally posted by Mapraputa Is:
[QB][/QB]


In India, not sure why but they give some english sounding name to their pets like Tommy etc.
There are some Hindi names but they are reserved for pets only like Sheru.
It could be an offence to give human like name
http://www.itechnology.co.za/index.php?click_id=29&art_id=qw1049779980278B253&set_id=1
Or genrally people avoid to give human name to pet.
Or they give human name to insult that person.
About human names in India, 90% of the names are name of some God/dess or their meaning is to praise the person.
Ravish => Ravi + ish
Meaning = God of Sun
but in English :
Assault sexually; force to have sex
[ June 20, 2003: Message edited by: Ravish Kumar ]
 
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MI: Most people I knew in Russia gave pet human names,...
Sometimes with patronymics... I once knew a Russian bitch named "Daisi Charliovna" (Daisy, daughter of Charles). (OK, the patronymic was made up, but it was a great pet name nonetheless.)
Also, there are "default" names for cats and dogs. If people do not know cat's name they call him "Vas'ka"
Or they use the Finnish "kissa" to summon the cat.
I know in the first edition of Genevra Gerhart's The Russian's World there's a table of common Russian pet names.
This means that for in Russian lingual image of the universe cats are more human than dogs.
Isn't that a bit of a leap?
 
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Or genrally people avoid to give human name to pet.
Or they give human name to insult that person.


I think that the owner of the pet do not want to consider the name of the pet,give it a name to remember easy,so choose the name which is impression.
I cann't deny that it is common in Hong Kong TOOoooooooooooooo.......
I get interesting of the following:
The pet owner NEVER give a animal name to the pet such as you have a dog,you would not give it a name called "cat".I wonder why?
why cann't do that?
 
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My cats are named:
Kokie - which we derived from the word "kocka" which is Czech for cat.
Malibu - she had that name when we got her and it seemed to fit
Biggles - from a character on Monty Python (Captain Biggles, who wore antlers on his head whenever he was dictating to his extrmely buxom secretary)
Our two cats that have since passed on were named:
Bowie - named after a bottle of Beaujolais wine (and not the rock star) that we were drinking the night we got her
Bounder - named because she was an insane little kitten that bounded around my then fiance's apartment as if she was on drugs
 
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Tipsy the cat - kept falling over as a kitten
Tabitha the cat - a tabby (yeah, you got it)
Frank the cat - I've no idea why
Roscoe the dog - as dumb as that Dukes of Hazzard character
When some gypsies moved temporarily onto nearby common land I discovered one of their dogs was called "Dog". Very amusing watching a bunch of pikey kids running around shouting "Dog"...
While I was at uni one of my mates houses got themselves a cat and named it Sh*tbag. Students eh? :roll: It changed to Baggy after a week. The housemates were a little self-conscious calling it in every night.
 
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Misty - dog
Jigsaw - cat
Jupiter - cat
Pumpkin - cat
Sunshine - Guinea Pig
Mr. Green - Iguana
Dogs are often called "Fido" or "Spot" by default in the US.
 
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Dogs:
Starla - After a Smashing Pumpkins Song
Emily - After Emily Dickinson
Rosco - After a nickname my father used to call me
Sebastian - I have no idea. My wife named him
Cuddles - Because she was cuddly (wife again)
We no longer have any of these dogs. But when we get another one our next names might be:
Gus - After my wifes main character in her childrens stories
Dante - After Count of Monte Cristo
My ideal name for a Dog would be Damnit so when I want him/her I can just yell
"Come here Damnit" or "Damnit, stop"
 
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To be specific, HOW I call my pet is a specific whistle, an up whistle followed by a down whistle, where the down whistle does not descend as much as the up whistle rises (does this make sense?)
You probably want to know the name of my dog. He's a bi-black Shetland Sheepdog, mostly black with a white ruff (chest), collar, and paws. Hence his name, Tuxedo.
Mark.
 
Mapraputa Is
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Originally posted by Thomas Paul:

Kokie - which we derived from the word "kocka" which is Czech for cat.


How do you pronounce "kocka"? "ck" combination looks strange enough to make me suspect that it's a Czech word rendered in less developed English alphabet. Does "c" letter has a mark above? The word looks similar to Russian "koshka" for "cat", so I am curious.
 
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Cats:
  • Tigger - she's a Singleton and Mother of most of the rest
  • Tomas - definintely of Hispanic origin
  • Jesus - just like Tomas
  • Julio - just like Tomas
  • Tamika - definintely of African American origin
  • Art - Short for "The Artist Formerly Known As"


  • We currently only have one dog whom my son named JoJo after his girlfried. We lost our beloved Boxer last year who was named Tyson.
     
    Thomas Paul
    mister krabs
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    Originally posted by Mapraputa Is:

    How do you pronounce "kocka"? "ck" combination looks strange enough to make me suspect that it's a Czech word rendered in less developed English alphabet. Does "c" letter has a mark above? The word looks similar to Russian "koshka" for "cat", so I am curious.


    kočka - pronounced as if it was written kochka.
    [ June 20, 2003: Message edited by: Thomas Paul ]
     
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