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Real Beginner II

 
Greenhorn
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Hi all,
So as a beginner, how do you know what downloads you want? There are JREs, SDKs, JDKs etc. on top of that there are patches, roasters and all kind of other "Java-thingies". I've read the sun Website, but I get confused about what I should use to write Java. I've used the SDK before. I think it was version 1.2. What's the best thing to learn with? I'm interested in Applications, Websites and Guis.
I also have a problem installing the "stuff" after I download it.
What do you think about Visual Age? That's what a lot of the Java people I know have been working with at work. Could I use that to start with?
Mark
 
Ranch Hand
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Well since im new to Java also, my input probably doesnt mean much. But heres what ive been told. Everyone i have talked to says to stick with the JDK. Use notepad(or similar utility) to write with. I was given the rationale that if you can become comfortable with a simple text editor, then when you advance to other utilities you will feel alot more comfortable. I know it seems hard at first to only use a text editor, but i feel confident that its the right thing to do to get the most from learning Java.
 
Sheriff
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What used to be called "JDK" is now called SDK. Other than that, I agree with Andy. Also, once you find that you are creating and compiling several Java files at once, consider getting and using "Ant" from the Apache Group to manage your compilation and delivery. Then you don't really need an IDE or complex interface at all, and can develop software on any system which supports Java.
 
Ranch Hand
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even i am having a problem in installing it after downloading
please advice
 
Ranch Hand
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What sort of problems are you having?
Also, what are you trying to install on what version of what OS?
 
Mark Covert
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I had a problem with the path while trying to install the SDK at work on an NT machine a while back. I think it was version 1.2. I think I have that straightened out now. At least everything seems to run.
I'm not sure I'll be able to do it again when I try to install everything at home. I have two machines there: One with Windows the other with ME.
I'm just not sure what to use:
Do I want to use the J2SE, or a J2EE? My guess is the J2SE, but I want to build a "complex" game for my first real Java project and I was thinking perhaps I might need some of the other features later on. My game won't have any graphics or anything complex like that, but it might use some pictures or clip art. I don't want to have to switch horses in midstream later on. I don't know if I need an "enterprise-class server-side application" to do all that or not.
I get lost on the Jargon:
What is a comprehensive Application Programming Model and Compatibility Test Suite? (It sure sounds nice! Does it come with a waterbed?)
What is a enterprise-class server-side application? ( I think I had one once, but the wheels fell off.)
What is a beta release?

Mark
 
Grant Crofton
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Damned if I know..
I don't really know what the differences between SE and EE are - I think EE has extra stuff for when you're creating some kind of commercial e-commerce server, for example.
I have the standard edition, and that has everything you neeed to make games and pretty much anything else you'd want to.
I don't think it matters if you use win or ME - should work fine on either.
 
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Have you been to: http://www.javaranch.com/cattledrive.jsp
And done all that?


I'm just not sure what to use:
Do I want to use the J2SE, or a J2EE? My guess is the J2SE, but I want to build a "complex" game for my first real Java project and I was thinking perhaps I might need some of the other features later on. My game won't have any graphics or anything complex like that, but it might use some pictures or clip art. I don't want to have to switch horses in midstream later on. I don't know if I need an "enterprise-class server-side application" to do all that or not.


First learn to use J2SE, only then you'll be able to use J2EE.

What is a beta release?


Beta release is one that's not finalized yet. It's been put out there so that bugs can be found by developers. If you are new to Java, I'd suggest you not worrying about playing with beta yet.
 
Mark Covert
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Ok. I'm working on a tutorial right now. After that, I will try the cattle drive.
Mark
 
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Mark
My 2 cents.
Stick to J2SE for now, only use J2EE when you need it and are ready for it.
Use a simple text editor rather than an IDE, to begin with you want to spend your time learning Java, not the IDE. I find TextPad very simple and effective to use.
Just download the SDK (with documentation) and nothing else, and enjoy.
 
Mark Covert
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I just checked the "Java-thingy" that I have is called the:
Java� 2 Standard Edition Runtime Environment
Is that the same as the J2SE? Sorry, I'm still confused about all the products. I guess they have changed the names since the last time I downloaded something.

Mark
 
Frank Carver
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If you want to develop Java software you probably need a full Java 2 SE SDK. The Runtime Environment (aka JRE) is just a system for running class files, and does not include the compiler or other development tools.
 
"The Hood"
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The Java 2 SDK comes with a JRE (Java Runtime Environment) bundled in it. Only developers need the SDK. End Users JUST need the JRE. The JRE has a JVM inside it, allowing it to be used for applications outside of a browser.
Many applications come with the appropriate JRE bundled with them to prevent problems with versioning.
The J2SE is for us regular folks. The J2EE is for when you are ready to progress to Enterprise programming. This involves creating Enterprise Javabeans (note: this is NOT the same as regular Javabeans) and JSP's (Java ServerPages) and servlets.
Consider this an advanced topic until you have the Java language fairly under control.
 
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