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Thinking in an Object Oriented Language

 
Dirk Schreckmann
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Hello,
Does anyone have any advice in learning to think more clearly in an Object Oriented Language? Any web sites or books of particular value?
A vague question, indeed, but a most important concept!
 
Corey McGlone
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Originally posted by Dirk Schreckmann:
Hello,
Does anyone have any advice in learning to think more clearly in an Object Oriented Language? Any web sites or books of particular value?
A vague question, indeed, but a most important concept!

Indeed, this is a vague question, and I feel that it could get a hundred responses and still not be thoroughly covered. I'll give you a couple tips to start off.
First of all, I like to think of classes as "black boxes." Each class offers certain functionality through the use of its methods. All details are contained within that box and are invisible to anyone outside the box (this is the notion of encapsulation). Try to keep your classes from dealing with each other's internal data members.
Also, I'd recommend spending some time on JavaJunkies. It's another forum site like this one and, even though the site is rather young, it has some good tutorials that cover such things.
I hope this at least helps you get started.
Corey
 
Michael Ernest
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Hi Dirk -
I came into OO programming by practice, but friends of mine who started by reading generally like Bruce Eckel's book, Thinking in Java, as a primer. You can also download an edition for free to see if you really want it on paper.
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Michael Ernest, co-author of: The Complete Java 2 Certification Study Guide
 
Bosun Bello
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I liked Beginning Java Objects by Jacque Barker
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Bosun
SCJP for the Java� 2 Platform
 
Dirk Schreckmann
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Hello,
Thank you all for your great advice. The book by Bruce Eckel looks to be just what I need to get my brain in gear.
Thanks again.
 
Julia Reynolds
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Mr. Eckel sells a terrific seminar on his site called Hands On Java. If you watch it as you read each chapter of the book it really reinforces and enhances the material in the book. I highly recommend Hands On Java.
Julia
[This message has been edited by Julia Reynolds (edited January 01, 2002).]
 
Fei Ng
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OOL... Learn patterns!! it helps a lot! while learning patterns learn UML too.
here is a good list of books from javaranch.
http://www.javaranch.com/bunkhouse/bunkhouseDesign.jsp
 
Axel Janssen
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Hi Dirk,
I think Fei is right.
On Bruce Eckels site there is a unfinished book about oo-design patterns (Thinking in patterns), which is good but unfinished. And it costs no money.
A very good starter for what-I-think-is modern object oriented thinking is Shalloway/Trott: Design Patterns Explained.
A good starter for UML is Fowler/Scott: UML Distilled.
A good overview about the technical side of OO project-management is Larman, Applying UML and Patterns 2nd edition.
Axel

[This message has been edited by Axel Janssen (edited January 01, 2002).]
 
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A.Shalloway, J.Trott "Design Patterns Explained" is the best book for beginners not only on patterns, but on what OOP really is.
 
Fei Ng
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i second on Design Patterns Explained.
Best BEST book to start.
 
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