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The best java library?

 
Doug Wang
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Is there any open source project or library like Boost library(a great c++ library)?
Can someone pls. recommend one? That might be a good source for learning and demonstration. Thanks.
 
Bear Bibeault
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Doug, you might want to describe what Boost does for C++. There are so many Java "libraries" out there, both commercial and freely available, that it's impossible to answer your question without narrowing down what you are after.
bear
 
Doug Wang
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Boost was begun by members of the C++ Standards Committee Library Working Group. Its goal is to establish "existing practice" and provide reference implementations so that the Boost libraries are suitable for eventual standardization.
Boost libraries are readable with good documentation, thus makes it a good source for learning and demonstration.
Any Java equivalence out there?
[ March 28, 2002: Message edited by: Doug Wang ]
 
Younes Essouabni
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Sun provide already a good library! I don't think you need more to learn java! If you need something really specific, it might be commercial, but for me the Sun's java API is more than enough!
 
Vishakha Ahuja
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Isn't Java API all we need as a library ?
 
Selvan tiru
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Originally posted by Doug Wang:
Boost was begun by members of the C++ Standards Committee Library Working Group. Its goal is to establish "existing practice" and provide reference implementations so that the Boost libraries are suitable for eventual standardization.
Boost libraries are readable with good documentation, thus makes it a good source for learning and demonstration.
Any Java equivalence out there?
[ March 28, 2002: Message edited by: Doug Wang ]

Java is a propriotory language from SUN unlike
C++ which has different work group approach.
Java API from SUN systems is the bible.
 
Jason Kretzer
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Java is a propriotory language from SUN

I think what you mean is that only Sun is allowed to modify the Java Libraries. In this, I think you are correct. Isn't dabbling with the Java Libraries what got Microsoft in trouble a few years back with J++? They made code that would only work on Windows.
I think it is best that Sun does make the final decisions on what goes into the language as long as they don't change their own rules and start tweaking stuff so it only works on Solaris. Having only one "standard" library is what will make Java truly ubiquitous. There can be no fracturing if it is truly going to compete.
C++ is a very good and powerful language but all of the varied libraries out there make it difficult to use. For example, how do you make a gui in C++? Well, you can use the XWindows, Cygwin, or MFC(that I know of). If you write it with one it will not necessarily run with any of the others without shipping the libraries with it. In Java, you write it and if the user has the one library(JRE) you know it will most likely work(barring issues having to do with version).
Sorry for the rant, its just my two coppers,
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by Jason Kretzer:

I think what you mean is that only Sun is allowed to modify the Java Libraries.

Actually, that hasn't been true for some years now. Sun did invent Java and owns the trademark an licensing rights. The industry complained about Sun having a monopoly on Java, so Sun responed with the JCP (Java Community Process).
Currently, all Java APIs are designed and reviwed by Java Expert Groups. Anyone may apply to be a member of the group, as long as they are part of the Java Community Process. There is a $5K annual fee for a company. For academics I think it's cheaper.
The committee can define the APIs and related specifications. It then goes before the Executive Committee (EC) for review. The EC is made up of 15 elected companies, although I think Sun may have a standing seat.
The proposed APIs (or changes) will be reviwed, first by the Java Community, and then by the public.
I've greatly oversimplied the players and the process, but that's the general idea. See http://jcp.org/ for more info,

--Mark
[ March 28, 2002: Message edited by: Mark Herschberg ]
 
Jason Kretzer
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Oh, Ok. Thanks for the information.
 
Doug Wang
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Buddies,
Thanks all for your inputs. But could you be kind enough to recommend some open source project with readable source code and documents?
 
Mike Curwen
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Well....

I work mostly in servlet/jsp realm, so I know a few things in this area.

The one that really stands out in my mind is the 'Struts' framework. It's an MVC framework that assists servlet programmers.

You could check it out at http://jakarta.apache.org/struts/index.html

As for a J2SE framework, I'm actually not aware of too many. Like others have said here, the JCP and Sun are pretty much covering the bases with the "standard java libraries" and various extensions to those libraries. I'm not aware of anyone that has coded a framework that can replace whole segments of the standard API.

If you are simply looking for tutorials that show you how to use the existing framework (aka: Java API) then Sun has their own tutorials and other goodies. here's a launch page:
http://developer.java.sun.com/developer/onlineTraining/new2java/
 
Steve Deadsea
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I try to make all of my utilities so they are well written, readable, and documented. They have browsable source and javadoc.
http://ostermiller.org/utils/
 
Doug Wang
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Originally posted by Steve Deadsea:
I try to make all of my utilities so they are well written, readable, and documented. They have browsable source and javadoc.
http://ostermiller.org/utils/

Thanks for the information and your contribution. I believe I would love your utilities library.
 
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