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Let's translate Jim!

 
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Posted by Jim: I am trying to find out what my name would be if translated into latin. I know James is Spanish of Jacob, and I (think) I can across Jacomus as the latin "version". Any idea's on resources?
Answer: Iacomus is a Late Latin variant of Iacobus, the Latin form of NT Greek Iakobos, the equivalent of Hebrew Yaakov. You can either use the "correct" Latin Iacobus (or Jacobus if you prefer), or the variant Iacomus, which is closer to your English name (and in fact its source).
Note that, while James and Jacob are considered different names in English, they're historically the same, and in French (for example) they're both Jacques.
On translating names

[ October 02, 2003: Message edited by: Mapraputa Is ]
 
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This is my new toy Babylon's translation of Jim and Thomas John Paul to Russian:
Джим.
Томас Джон Поль
Фома Джон Павел
Пол Paul ; name of Apostle of Jesus (also the other variants)
пола - noun. skirt, lap, flap, tail
пол - noun. floor, flooring, ground, sex , gender
Пола - female - Paula, female first name


It even has a speech function in a male or female voice !Thomas had two variants and Paul three.I hope I picked the right ones.
Babylon only handles one word at a time and I think the Speech is just in American English.
No matches for Mapraputa in Russian.Let's try English!
I think it's telling me in Russian that there are no matches for Mapraputa in English.
I'd advice you to use the name Paul judiciously when in Russia.
Jim seems no trouble as I think it's an acquired American name.
Джеймс - James and Иаков Jacob . No trouble there as the translations just show their Biblical origins.
regards
[ October 03, 2003: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
 
Mapraputa Is
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пол - noun. floor, flooring, ground, sex , gender
they just found a word that sounds like "Paul".
It means both "floor" and "gender" (not "sex" in its worst sense, these are different words in Russian).
No matches for Mapraputa in Russian. Let's try English! I think it's telling me in Russian that there are no matches for Mapraputa in English.
No wonder. My name is Margarita, (Russian Маргарита ) and to make my name look like Russian while using English letters, I had to substitute some letters, so it's "Mapraputa"
[ October 03, 2003: Message edited by: Mapraputa Is ]
 
HS Thomas
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маргарита - Margaret - female first name.
Map, I just cannot identify you with any Margarets I know.
If you had to assume the name Margaret you'd lose an intrinsic part
of you. I think this is where the value of translating names
is debatable.
Any idea why you were called Mapraputa ?
Jim and Thomas are rather unassuming name, Jim more so.
Which is probably why Jim, naturlich, wants to find a Latin translation.

regards
[ October 03, 2003: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
 
Mapraputa Is
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Any idea why you were called Mapraputa ?
But you just said: "if you had to assume the name Margaret you'd lose an intrinsic part of you" !
Jim and Thomas are rather unassuming name, Jim more so.
Um... Both sound very romantic to me
Which is probably why Jim, naturlich, wants to find a Latin translation.
But it was another Jim! I doubt Jim is longing for Latin translation of his name, if was me who was so excited about variety
 
HS Thomas
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Both sound very romantic to me


Well , I'm used to Thomases.
But thinking about it, neither Jims (only context I know Jim is an American name) nor Mapraputas (in one context from the Ranch that now I know it's a Russian name).
Now James would be more assuming, James the III takes more significance,
, King James rather pretentious,
With Jim you cannot do much. Jim Yingst takes on much,much more significance. Especially after spending time on the Ranch throwing wobblies his way.(like I think Bert's trying to do in Programming Diversions).
More American Jims from Babylon: (I like this Babylon , they even describe it's architecture which I will take a closer look at).
Jim -Henson,Beckwourth,Crow Law,Harrison,Brown, McGuffin, Dine , Fitzsimmons Sunny Jim :
I think there's a song about a Jim Brown.
James Yingst isn't a power-name as Jim Yingst.
A Iacomus Yingst would have trouble coping in this brave new World.
don't get carried away when naming any children of yours, Jim.
Now if you care to change your surname ,Jim to Pavarotti,
a Iacomus Pavarotti may do very well indeed especially if he had a good pair of lungs.
I think that's why parents take more liberties with female names as last names are readily adaptable. A Mapraputa Blogg goes down well in any situation. But I don't think this Map would Blogg. Map has standards, you see.
regards
[ October 03, 2003: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
 
HS Thomas
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But it was another Jim


foot in mouth
There's another Jim ?
That was a leading title , Map .
Sorry Jim!
Iocomus "other" Jim (Pavarotti) , please carry on!
regards
 
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Latin was used for years in England to keep the working class out of middle class trades( law, medicine ) has anyone stories of similar snoberies in America, or anywhere else in fact.
Tony
 
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If the debate is "Let's translate a name : "


Pros:
  • if used generically, then yes, this would be useful for in trace history.
    Cons:
  • if the translation is used specific to a person , the whole person would have to be translated, too, to be of real , real value.

  • regards
     
    HS Thomas
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    Originally posted by Tony Collins:
    Latin was used for years in England to keep the working class out of middle class trades



    Sanskrit was the language used for learning in temples as was Latin in monastries. Idon't think the original intention was to keep anyone out but exchanging information.
    It became useful to the rulers to keep that knowledge to themselves until rebellors found it useful to let the people know what was really going on and called for translations to the common language.
    That's my 2 pennies worth.
    regards
    [ October 03, 2003: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
     
    Tony Collins
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    I disagree there has been no reason for Latin other than prejedice in the last 200 years.
    IMO, doctors still pescribe in Latin.
    Tony
     
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    Originally posted by Tony Collins:
    Latin was used for years in England to keep the working class out of middle class trades( law, medicine ) has anyone stories of similar snoberies in America, or anywhere else in fact.
    Tony


    Hoo, yea. I have two degrees, Literature and Computer Science. Literature snobs use the the canon of criticism to exclude the lesser minds (you can't possibly appreciate Shakespeare's Tempest until you've mastered Jung) in much the same way CS geeks use advanced physics to belittle others (I can't predict how long it will take to code because I haven't coded it. Let me tell you about Schrodinger's Cat. Oh, and Heisenberg).
     
    Mapraputa Is
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    There's another Jim ?
    Not here, but on the blog I quoted in mein first post.
    Sanskrit was the language used for learning in temples as was Latin in monastries. Idon't think the original intention was to keep anyone out but exchanging information.
    I believe this is called Diglossia.
     
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    [HST]: There's another Jim ?
    [Map]: Not here, but on the blog I quoted in mein first post.

    Well, there are some other Jims around here, but I make sure they don't become too prominent, so that I can remain the canonical jim@javaranch.com. Map, of course, was just being difficult when she titled this thread.
    A Iacomus Yingst would have trouble coping in this brave new World.
    I'd be embarrassed to have such a morphological mismatch, given that the initial sound of each name is "y". Admittedly Iacomus Iingst would be rather strange too. If we're translating... what's "youngest" in Latin?
     
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    Originally posted by Jim Yingst:
    what's "youngest" in Latin?


    iuvencissimus?
    Iacomus Iuvencissimus
    sounds good
    cb
     
    Chris Baron
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    @Jim: is Yingst of german origin ?
     
    HS Thomas
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    The Gladiator - Iacomus Iuvencissimus Ingst
    ==============
    My Babylon doesn't have Latin included.
    But Iuvencissimus translated to concurrences in Russian.
    regards
     
    Chris Baron
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    Iuvencissimus is Ingst yet
    Yingst > youngest > iuvencissimus
    That's why i asked Jim if his name was german. Because Yingst sounds similar to Jüngst(er) wich means youngest. Jüngst could also mean "recently". In Latin this was "nuper" then.
    Iacomus Nuper
    cb
    btw. does your browser show the umlauts?
    [ October 03, 2003: Message edited by: Chris Baron ]
     
    HS Thomas
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    Because Yingst sounds similar to J�ngst wich means younger.


    So Jim wants to know what's "youngest".
    Is it Jungest? No , it is j�ngste!

    My Browser is MS IE.It does show umlauts when I paste them in.

    regards
    [ October 03, 2003: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
     
    Jim Yingst
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    @Jim: is Yingst of german origin ?
    Yep. I mean, Ja.
    Because Yingst sounds similar to J�ngst
    Exactly. That's the form it had originally, when my ancestors arrived in what was not yet the United States of America as part of the Pennsylvania Dutch. There are about twenty variant spellings we found in the family tree - Yingst, Yungst, Yuengst, Jungst, Juengst (which is really the original, adapted to our lack of umlauts), and others.
    --------------------
    Catapultam habeo. Nisi pecuniam omnem mihi dabis, ad caput tuum saxum immane mittam. -- Iacomus Iuvencissimus
     
    Chris Baron
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    There are some american names where i always imagined how the just landed declared their name in the immigration office ( was it Ellis Island? ) and the officer decided how this is written .
    Schneider = Snyder
    Hoffmann = Huffman
    etc.
    But with your posting it rather seems that it was up to individual interpretation how one's name was spelled...at least for earlier settlers.
    To the Nuper thing again... jüngst also means recently, but it's the short form of jüngster Zeit ( youngest Time ) so it is definitely "youngest". Iacomus Iuvencissimus sounds better anyway.
    Pennsylvania Dutch? Is this gadget common to you?
    cb
    [ October 03, 2003: Message edited by: Chris Baron ]
     
    Mapraputa Is
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    What's amazing, this thread has 20 posts and it hasn't been hijacked yet!
    Oops.
    --------------------
    "I think it's telling me in Russian that there are no matches for Mapraputa in English." -- HS Thomas
     
    HS Thomas
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    Originally posted by Mapraputa Is:
    I doubt Jim is longing for Latin translation of his name,



    I think we enabled the translation of the whole личность ,Map!

    What does Jim's sig say, now?
    regards
    [ October 03, 2003: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
     
    Chris Baron
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    Oh my god he's got a catapult!
    ?but not enough money to throw a rock at the readers? infuriating head?
    It's getting really babylonic here
    Latin was my first foreign language at school and i hated it abysmally.
    My grades were corresponding.
    Good Night from here
    cb
     
    HS Thomas
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    Good night, Chris.
    Iuvencissimus was the best!
    regards
    [ October 03, 2003: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
     
    HS Thomas
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    (Trans.: ' I have a catapult. Give me all the money or I will fling an enormous rock at your head." )
    We know what Jim wears on a T-shirt,now.
    To be gladitorial, a part ought to be changed.
    Gladiator in arena consilium capit.
    The gladiator is formulating his plan in the arena (i.e., too late) (Seneca)
    Heu! Tintinnuntius meus sonat! - Darn! There goes my beeper!
    regards
     
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    Well, James is a greek name, Demetris or Demetrius (both are correct). How this was turned into James I don't know.
    I also know Russians use Demetris, or Demetri. Don't know if Russians interpret this as James also or as something else.
     
    HS Thomas
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    Originally posted by Mapraputa Is:
    What's amazing, this thread has 20 posts and it hasn't been hijacked yet!


    You mean it's time to get the original Jim transliterated!
     
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    Map, I just cannot identify you with any Margarets I know.
    How about Major Margret (Hotlips) Hoolihan? Did I just hijack the thread?
     
    HS Thomas
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    личность ,Map!


    личность - Map is interpreted as impression, I think, as in personality as well as a map.
    личность ,Map! I meant personae, earlier.
    'Hotlips' triggered Babylon to trek off to the Web and find an educational site which also had the word 'BoneBender' on it.

    regards
     
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