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Outsourced call centres and credit card info

 
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worrying:-
http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/news/business/articles/timid74070
 
mister krabs
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And this is a surprise why? You have a employee making virtually nothing in possession of information that is worth 10X-20X their annual salary if they sell it. To put it in US terms, if you were making $50,000 a year and someone offered you $500,000 or $1,000,000 for some information what would you do?
Before you put people in charge of private information or corporate secrets you better be sure those people have your company's interests as their primary focus.
 
Steven Broadbent
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I'm not surprised - this is the tip of the iceberg I bet.
With insurance and mortgage work being outsourced, what legal resource will consumers have when it all goes west (no pun intended!)?
 
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Companies who outsource only sees the advantage of saving more money. They forget about security of their data that could destroy their business. I guess when news like these becomes rampant, this will help the jobs come back.
 
Thomas Paul
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Originally posted by Justine Jade:
Companies who outsource only sees the advantage of saving more money. They forget about security of their data that could destroy their business. I guess when news like these becomes rampant, this will help the jobs come back.


As soon a the first company is destroyed because their information was sold, as soon as the first lawsuit dealing with patient confidential information crushes a company, as soon as companies are hurt by outsourcing there will be a huge anti-outsourcing surge. Companies are like sheep. When one sheep runs the whole flock follows.
 
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In the UK I believe you have to sign something that allows companies to hold your data abroad, or tick a box when your signing to say they can hold data on you. If my bank asked me to sign such a thing I would not. Read their data protection policies carefully when you sign them.
 
Steven Broadbent
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The Data protection act. I think it says that the data must be physically stored in the UK, but can't remember the details.
Have heard rumblings about it being violated with outsourcing, but haven't heard anything concrete yet.
Maybe we need a combined lawsuit by consumers against some mega corp that decided to pass on the "savings" gained by outsourcing to its customers - or rather to it's directors.
 
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There's some law that applies to everyone, outsourcing or not. As far as what law applies in the UK , I think it's a case of "whatever they said" they being the US.
Also , wasn't creation of an extra 22 million jobs in the US alone mentioned somewhere ? Just think CEO's can be put into jail 'cos the DBAs didn't do enough concurrency testing ?
" Good Business
While these laws mean a whole lot of overtime for storage professions in the coming years, privacy is actually far more than a legal obligation. As the Harris Interactive Surveys show, it is also good business.
Almost 50 percent of consumers, for example, would buy more frequently and in greater volume from companies known to have more reliable privacy practices. On the other hand, 83 percent would stop doing business entirely with companies that misuse private information. 75 percent mistrust company confidentiality, transaction security and protection against hackers.
The bottom line: Customers want their information kept private. And storage professionals are going to be under more corporate scrutiny than ever as a result of the legislation covered above."
Trust, Mistrust and Consumer Information
January 27, 2004
By Drew Robb


Recent Harris Interactive surveys reveal that most customers still do not trust companies to handle their personal information responsibly. Reflecting consumer mistrust, several governmental regulations have emerged to legislate security and build consumer trust.
The laws are complex, demanding stiff fines and jail time for offending executives. This article, therefore, gives an overview of the regulations and describes the challenges and opportunities facing storage and IT managers.
Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act
Enacted by the U.S. Federal government in 1999, this act applies only to financial institutions. It covers security for customer private information.
Requires: Administrative, technical and physical safeguards to protect customer information; privacy notices and opt-out provisions; vigilance against future threats; responsibility for outsourced security solutions.
Implications: Increased storage volume and secure backup storage, increased network and storage security; data encryption at source; company-wide policies, risk assessments and reports.
California Senate Bill 1386
"1386" went into effect in July 2003 and applies to companies doing business in California and all companies holding personal information of California residents. A customer can bring civil suit for damages.
Requires: Disclosure of any security breach in which unencrypted personal information might have been acquired by an unauthorized person; procedures to identify and contact persons affected; due diligence in protecting customer information from unauthorized access. There is no definition of the level of encryption.
Implications: Data encryption at source and throughout data lifecycle; network and storage security layers; zoning.
Sarbanes-Oxley Act
Enacted by the US Federal Government in 2002 in response to corporate financial scandals, this act applies to all publicly held companies in the U.S. that have more than $75 million equity market capitalization and that report quarterly to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). It covers financial reporting, auditing practices and associated document retention. Holding CEOs and CFOs directly responsible, this act has a major effect on U.S. corporations and already sent one executive to jail. This act does not directly regulate consumer privacy, but it has important Storage and IT implications. Requires: Save all documentation used for financial reports and audits; save transactions and meeting minutes; retain data for 5 years; locate and recover documents in a few days.
Implications: Increased storage volume; indexed document retrieval from primary and backup media; Write-Once-Read-Many (WORM) storage; disaster recovery including geographically isolated synchronized storage.
Page 2: SEC Rule 17a, Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act


[Go to page: 2 ]
[ February 15, 2004: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
 
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A better term is off-shoring. There are many companies in the US that do out-sourcing. EDS, IBM. HP, CSC ...
 
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wasn't creation of an extra 22 million jobs in the US alone mentioned somewhere


No, that was a guess from a consultancy group based on numbers that don't even exist.
It's a total fabrication.
 
HS Thomas
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And there's the growing public anger.


Only last week two Colorado lawmakers, Deanne Hanna and Terry Phillips introduced bills to prevent state contracts being awarded to firms who get their job done from other countries. Hanna�s bill, SB 170, was killed by a Colorado Senate panel, thanks to Republicans, who opposed the bill.
This trend of legislations trying to ban outsourcing and off shoring has been around for quite some time now. Senator John Kerry, D-Massachusetts, who has to date won Democratic primaries and caucuses in 12 out of 14 states, has said that American firms that ship jobs to other countries are traitors.
Kerry denounced the administration of President George W. Bush for "rewarding Benedict Arnold CEOs who move profits and jobs overseas," referring to an American revolutionary who joined the British colonists during the war for independence. Kerry had introduced a bill in November that would require call centers to identify their physical locations, and Congress approved a measure in an appropriations bill last month that would ban overseas outsourcing for a limited range of government service contracts.
As the sluggish economic recovery is compounded with minimal job growth, lawmakers are attempting to clamp down on job flight in response to growing public anger at jobs that are moving overseas.


[ February 15, 2004: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
 
Steven Broadbent
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That's good news...hope politicians over here start to do the same.
The politicians owe a little something to their own citizens who have contributed so much to economic growth.
 
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I was going to suggest that if (UK) people are really concerned that their bank may be affected by this, that they set up accounts with a bank that has their call centres based in the UK (Like Halifax / Bank of Scotland), but then I realised that the same fraud could just as likely happen here.
Mark
 
Jason Cox
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Originally posted by Mark Fletcher:
but then I realised that the same fraud could just as likely happen here.


Not necessarily.
In some countries this may not be as severe of a crime if it is a crime at all. Selling credit card or personal info may lose your job, but at the rates Organized Crime would be willing to pay, that could be a small sacrifice indeed!
Furthermore, I know a lot of financial institutions I've worked with have severe internal controls on information and who can access it. Mostly just to cover their own rears. Who is to say an outsourced call center, a place that likely has not seen the widespread fraud and crime we've already experienced, is going to have those same controls? So far, it appears that they do not.
Not to mention that it is far cheaper to bribe a foreign worker than it would be a native one. After all, the justification for off-shoring is that it is ten-times cheaper, right? So then it's also ten times cheaper to bribe people as well.
The biggest problem with off-shore workers is that they are human, just like anyone else. The continual treatment of them as soulless automations without fault or desire is possibly the biggest downfall of off-shoring. It's not as though the outstanding treatment and respect (sarcasm!) heaped upon them by their American employers is building any real loyalty.
Really, at off-shore rates, organized crime is getting a bargain.
 
Steven Broadbent
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Also the fact that Scotland Yard couldn't nick them.
 
Mark Fletcher
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Well unless theyre training the off shore staff at the call center to speak in a thick Scottish accent, I guess Im safe for now! (my account is with H/BOS)
 
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Forget offshoring, having the call centres in Liverpool is bad enough. I called vodaphone yesterday, and I couldn't understand what the woman was saying - I had to ask her to repeat just about everything.
I think that if I called a help line and got through to someone whose accent I really couldnt understand I'd probably stop using that company. I wonder if companies offshoring have rules about their employees having a certain level of understandability by the customer base.
 
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"My fair Lady!!"
Recently I went to meet a friend in Noida from Delhi who is working for one BPO company.I enquired at reception and receptionist said that he and his team are busy in watching movie.and I can only meet after sometime.I met him and asked about this.He said people directly interacting with clients have to watch some British movie regularly until he develops British accent.After watching movie,everybody has to come forward and should try to explain the story in British accent.Everybody was asked to forget Indian accent for timebeing.
[ February 17, 2004: Message edited by: Tanga Palti ]
 
Tim Baker
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When I get the annoying sales calls from India they do tend to have good understandable accents, even if the line quality is poor. Even though you can hear their accent you can understand what they're saying unlike the scottish call centres.
 
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