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Which IDE's are most used by professionals?

 
Greenhorn
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I personally prefer to use MS Visual J++ 6 IDE, becuase its fast and has the autocomplete feature also. Well, for this, i have to add the the jar file to its classpath, buts its just a one time job for each project.
For running it, i dont think using the command prompt to run it is so difficult... The important feature that i expect from the IDE is its autocomplete feature of classnames and methods....
For developing the GUI, I wont recomend making use of any of the IDE, because the code generated will be very difficult to maintain and will be buggy.... I recomend doing it yourself, without any help of visual designers
regards,
Joe
 
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Has everyone forgotten the good ol' Editplus?Very Simple but no fancy things like method completion etc.
 
Greenhorn
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I am using IntelliJ's IDEA Version 3.02 Build 696 for my professional development work of automotive software. Sure it is not for free, but it saves a considerable amount of time for routine tasks. If you prefer your keyboard to your mouse for editing and controlling tools you'll just love it (I discovered a new shortcut this morning that lets you jump between the methods in an open file - great!).
 
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Eclipse is without any doubt the best IDE man has ever created simply because you can have anything u want
 
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I'd vote for IntelliJ IDEA, since it is a very very very friendly to use and also very powerfull.
The fact that it is not free is not actually a big problem since it is not that expensive.
I believe that anyone should download it and try using it, and only then you will understand what I am saying.
Fior those students who are learning java and have no plans to use this tool for production, and do not have the funds to pay for it, you can find several cracks for it(the latest version 3.XX) over the internet.
This by no mean prooves that I am with using softwares illegally, but I was a student, and I understand how difficult it is to buy an IDE just for working with for the course period and then throwing it away.
 
Greenhorn
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Originally posted by Marilyn deQueiroz:
You can compile from TextPad and also from UltraEdit, both text editors.
I like IntelliJ for large projects and text editors for writing small programs.


IntelliJ gets my vote as well, 'though I admit that I use it alongside UltraEdit. I've tried JBuilder (bulky and not as intuitive as IntelliJ) and Forte/Sun One CE seems quirky (though I like the idea of Java in a Java programming GUI). Eclipse too seems an interesting concept -a bit like the .NET Visual Studio- and should be worth a look.
Simon Drew
sdd@maerskdata.dk
 
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all of you may want to check out jdeveloper 10g, the latest orcle installment on the ide market.
It is very good, but obviously need more memory.
Oracles response will be that you can customize the IDE into not using and therefore not loading extensions (such as modelling, Version control etc) it is still a very heavy footprint memorywise.
for more info, read my other message about jdeveloper.
cheers,
friso
 
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The one I use is TextPad. Great working. Supports everything.
And I know what I am doing. Nothing happening in background.
Though Gel and JCreator are also good.
 
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I think Eclipse is the best IDE. It can check your code, search for errors and it has a lot of plugins. Also you can run CVS inside, to control program versions.
[ August 19, 2003: Message edited by: Alexandre Ferras ]
 
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Can some one pass me the market share of various IDE's?
 
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I use jDeveloper for J2SE, SunOne EE for developing J2EE app to SunOne App Server and WebSphere at work, to develop J2EE app for WebSphere.
 
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Despite I used Netbeans/Forte/Sun One Studio for one and half year, I find Eclipse very interesting for the last 3 months.
 
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This thread started October 2001 and still the party's strong... might as well cast my 0.02 cents.
I use Gel. It is free and provides most of my needs.
- since it is a native windows tool, it loads and runs fast.
Its open/save dialog boxes could be used to navigate or do cut and paste even accross networks.
- supports CVS
- it allows creation of classpaths "unique" for each project. Thus no need to keep on tweaking the
Windows OS environmental variables settings or Autoexec.bat.
- allows "compile and run" test inside the Gel window/console
- stores code templates that are easily accessible
- code/tag completion for java/jsp/custom tags, etc..
- has some good project management features, though a bit puzzling at first
- good even for low ram pcs
see other features including links to plugins at
http://www.gexperts.com/features.html
[ September 05, 2003: Message edited by: boyet silverio ]
 
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Glad to see my thread is still going strong 2 years later! To fill you in on my progress, I'm now working in the tech support dept for a call center in NC, and I've written several internal apps for the IT dept in Java (using Notepad). They are impressed with my work, however I still can't get a position as a programmer because I have no paid "real-world" experience. I'm Not sure what I'm supposed to do. I have my degree now (double major Comp Sci and Math), I'm certified as SCJP, A+ and Network+. Any suggestions on how to break into the programming world? (Programming is my true love and I won't quit until that's what I get to do all day). Keep the replies coming!
 
author
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I would advice to join an open source project. That should boost your experience in developing bigger systems in a team.
 
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Originally posted by Michael Bruesch:
Glad to see my thread is still going strong 2 years later! To fill you in on my progress, I'm now working in the tech support dept for a call center in NC, and I've written several internal apps for the IT dept in Java (using Notepad). They are impressed with my work, however I still can't get a position as a programmer because I have no paid "real-world" experience. I'm Not sure what I'm supposed to do. I have my degree now (double major Comp Sci and Math), I'm certified as SCJP, A+ and Network+. Any suggestions on how to break into the programming world? (Programming is my true love and I won't quit until that's what I get to do all day). Keep the replies coming!


We have a Jobs Discussion Forum specifically for topics like this. You may want to consider searching that forum. There is a lot of good advice there.
 
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Over the past several years I've used (in no particular order):
  • VI
  • Notepad
  • DOS Edit (yah!)
  • Emacs
  • Visual Age for Java (RIP at last)
  • JBuilder
  • Eclipse
  • Visual J++
  • FTE
  • and several others
  • I feel most at home in JBuilder and Eclipse, totally loath Visual Age for Java, but will use just about anything that's there as long as it gets the job done.
    When you're working remote on a Unix server it's often easier to use VI to quickly edit a JSP than to ftp it over to your workstation, edit it in your favourite editor, and ftp it back (especially if the source control system runs on the same machine or can be used from there).
     
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    We use WSAD but if we decided to go with a different IDE it'd be the technology it is based on which is eclipse. I also like JCreator and I used it for a huge contract job I worked on 2 years ago. It got the job done but the JBuilder guys seem to have a better go at it than I did as we were writing EJBs. The last company I worked for used VisualAge but it is no longer supported.
    WSAD is very nice but it is resource intensive and a bit buggy. All in all, I'd just assume to be using eclipse where I am at.
     
    Greenhorn
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    For several years, I used separate tools centered around a high powered editor - Codewright. I tried NetBeans for a while, but I wasn't totally happy with it. Then, I discovered IntelliJ IDEA. It will be hard to get me to switch to anything else. The refactoring, shortcuts, human engineering of the design really impress me. I haven't tried Eclipse.
    I still use Codewright for certain editing tasks. It and IntelliJ play well together when both have the same source file open.
     
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    IntelliJ's IDEA. No contest.
     
    Greenhorn
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    JCreator is fast
    Using currently JBuilder EE (for some strange reason)...
    UML and other neat stuff integrated..
    p.s. Naturally responded to some thread to get the free book.
    S.S
     
    Greenhorn
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    IntelliJ is an IDE made by developers for developers. Thanks to JetBrains for that great tool. 10 points. Worth every cent. Brilliant.
    PS: And if you're missing something there will exist a plugin .
     
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    I used both JBuilder 5 Enterprise Edition and VAJ for about 2 year plus. I more enjoy the features that provided by VAJ.

    steffy
     
    Greenhorn
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    Originally posted by Michael Bruesch:
    I'm a college student and we were recommended a few IDE's to download free. I got JGrasp (only cause I used PCGrasp for all my C++ developing, if it ain't broke...) and it seems fairly well. It's kinda slow loading cause it written in pure Java, but it makes testing Applets a breeze. But which ones are used most by professional Java Programmers?


    Hi Michael, I have done (some) research into what IDE would best suit our shop. A large government App. Dev. shop responsible for many types of applications and I came to the conclusion that Websphere Studio Application Developer (WSAD) was the perfect fit for what we needed to do. Yes the product is pricey, but we feel the benefits far outway the costs. The performance analysis tools (that come with WSAD) alone are worth the price 10 times over.
     
    It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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