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Best IDE (Eclipse or IntelliJ IDEA)?

 
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Originally posted by Gregg Bolinger:

Any modern IDE/Editor should do the following out of the box: J2SE, J2EE (and any variation - JSF, Struts, Tapestry, etc), and XML. IDEA does all this and more. But the key here is that the *and more* doesn't get in my way. It's there if I need it. It's dormant and tucked away if I don't.



I wish I could disagree with you! I have high hopes for the Eclipse Web Tools project which should give Eclipse all of the above out-of-the-box.

All I can say is: they're working on it!

Carlos
 
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I just started using Eclipse 3.0 about a month ago, after being a JBuilder fan for past 3 years. Got to tell you that first. price tag makes a big difference $500(dev), $3,500(enterprise). Plus every year some new suport is rolled out that you really want to get and it costs more $$$$ in upgrades. So so far I enjoy eclipse, still got a long way to go installing different plugins, like JBuilder would popup properties within custom tags, Eclipse just gives you the tag itslef. Like, I said maybe there is a way to do it with Eclipse as well, just got to play around more.

Its a pain with JBuilder Developer to switch between between even tomcat versions, and dont think its possible to switch to other Servers (need Enterprise for that)
 
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IMH one of the major differences between eclipse and JBuilder is with JBuilder you get stuck building apps the way Borland thinks you should build apps. Setting up a new project in eclispe is nearly as easy as creating a new folder. Doing the same with JBuilder involves running through a drawn out wizard and god help you if you mess it up. It has been a couple years since I've use JBuilder so maybe it's better now, but I don't think anybody could convince me it's worth the $$$.

P.S. The company I work for dropped JBuilder and is using eclipse. The decision was, in large part, a cost issue, but since then managment has been very open to open source work. I think we run almost eveything the Apache group has to offer.
 
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J2SE, J2EE (and any variation - JSF, Struts, Tapestry, etc), and XML. IDEA does all this and more.


Huh ?
I'm a user of IntelliJ but I don't know if there are plugins for JSF, would you give me the URL for this ?
 
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Hi Ilja, people,


Let's get that straight: It offers, for example,
- a keyboard shortcut to show a tree of all the classes where a polymorphic method is implemented, including the option to open those classes;
- the ability to switch the blocks of an if-else statement with just a couple of key presses, without changing its semantic;
- instant, automatic compilation every time you save a file, even if it contains compile time errors;
- instant, in-editor diff between the file in the editor and the version in the repository,


I know, Eclipse is just *so* powerful as well as being extremely fast. Having worked with the internals, I am enormously impressed with IBM's engineering.

Avoidance of Swing is a real performance boost. Compared with JBuilder and NetBeans, much of the useful assistance features (eg, code completion) appear much faster, as well as far more elegant.

No need for manual mounting of packages, it just works and 2-3x faster. Technologies such as cached workspace info and close parser/ compiler integration are probably at work here.

Quick tip: I like to designate the 'workspace' to be a short pathname close to the root - eg D:\workspace or D:\Dev\workspace. This helps interoperation of multiple tools/ IDEs which live below D:\Dev, with multiple projects which live in Workspace.

True, the basic Eclipse download is a 'vanilla' platform with only IDE and Java coding features. Yet this vanilla platform outperforms most other offerings. When you want JSP, XML etc editing you can add these - either as plugins or with a package such as WebSphereAD built on the eclipse platform.

As far UI designers, I've found it far more effective to use a static helper class to generate GridBagConstraints, and keep my code clean, than it ever was to edit or maintain the vast ugly wadding produced by a Swing designer.

YMMV, but I'm getting 40 miles to the gallon with 600 horsepower :-)


Cheers,
Thomas Whitmore
www.powermapjdo.com
 
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Originally posted by John Todd:

Huh ?
I'm a user of IntelliJ but I don't know if there are plugins for JSF, would you give me the URL for this ?



I'm not talking about Drag & Drop and all that jazz. Simply put, IDEA supports any technology you can throw on a JSP via taglibs. And that's all JSF really is as far as the view is concerned. Every other part of it is just java code.

My main point which I didn't state directly was that Eclipse requires you to download a plugin just to do simple J2EE development and it's not like there is just 1 that you go get. There are several and together they provide all the features you want, but individually, they are all missing something. Therein lies the problem for me. IDEA just works. However, I am aware of the web tools project for eclipse and I will be keeping my eye on that.
 
Steven Bell
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I would say it depends on what your 'J2EE' app relies on. Now maybe I'm using a rather broad defenition of J2EE, but when I'm doing something along those lines I'm usually using Tapestry for the frontend, and (more recently) hibernate for the backend. I would consider a web service app based on these technologies to be J2EE, but I don't think either of them are built into any IDE by default. I'd also expect a little more from IntelliJ as they want me to pay for it. If it didn't have significant advantages I couldn't understand why anybody would use it. To me it's not a 'which one is better' argument, but a 'which one is a better value' argument. (And yes something can be a much better value even if you have to pay for it and your comparing it to something free)
 
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Originally posted by Gregg Bolinger:

Any modern IDE/Editor should do the following out of the box: J2SE, J2EE (and any variation - JSF, Struts, Tapestry, etc), and XML. IDEA does all this and more. But the key here is that the *and more* doesn't get in my way. It's there if I need it. It's dormant and tucked away if I don't.
Anyway, my random thoughts.



I'd say that all those should be available as optional plugins, not bogging down the system by default.
I don't use Struts, Tapestry, and JSF, so why have an IDE force me into a project architecture geared towards using them (as for example Lomboz and others do)?

I do like having integrated editors for several languages like JSP and XML, but I can understand that there are people that would consider those ballast as well if they don't use those.
 
Jeroen Wenting
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Originally posted by Steven Bell:
IMH one of the major differences between eclipse and JBuilder is with JBuilder you get stuck building apps the way Borland thinks you should build apps. Setting up a new project in eclispe is nearly as easy as creating a new folder. Doing the same with JBuilder involves running through a drawn out wizard and god help you if you mess it up. It has been a couple years since I've use JBuilder so maybe it's better now, but I don't think anybody could convince me it's worth the $$$.



The same is true for any IDE.
With Eclipse you're working the way IBM thinks you should, with Netbeans the way Sun thinks you should.
With JBuilder I can set every single directory right there in the first screen, no "workspace" where everything goes unless I specifically click on an "advanced" button, then select external resources, select the directory to use, etc. etc. etc. (and then do the same again for the output folder).

All JBuilder expects (and can do without if you tell it to) is separate directories for sources and compiled code.
Indeed old versions could not easily handle multiple source directories in a single project, but the current version can do so very easily (and you can just as quickly switch between default source directories for creating new sources).
 
Jeroen Wenting
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Originally posted by Thomas Whitmore:
Hi Ilja, people,

I know, Eclipse is just *so* powerful as well as being extremely fast. Having worked with the internals, I am enormously impressed with IBM's engineering.

Avoidance of Swing is a real performance boost. Compared with JBuilder and NetBeans, much of the useful assistance features (eg, code completion) appear much faster, as well as far more elegant.



Quite in contrast I find JBuilder outperforming Eclipse by a wide margin.
Eclipse does outperform Netbeans though.
 
Greenhorn
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Just adding my extra 2 cents here...
The folks at JetBrains have announced the IntelliJ IDEA Open Source License . They are offering a " new initiative to the Open Source community: FREE license keys for our industry leading Java IDE, IntelliJ IDEA for developers of qualifying Open Source projects." You need to show that you are legitimate and active once a year to qualify.
 
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