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Win a copy of J2EE 1.4: The Big Picture

 
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Originally posted by Nicholas Cheung:

Besides the cover, could you provide us the table of content or sample chapters?

Nick



Me too.
 
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Originally posted by Anand Jayaraman:
Hi Chaps!
Would a person with basic J2EE benefit out of the book?

Again, does the skim through architecture, design issues ??



Well, a person who's got the basics of J2EE could benefit from parts of it because I got some darned smart people to help me out with it. Even beyond Mark and Anthony. Dan Johnsson from the Omegapoint security company in Sweden loaned me the gist of his talk from last year's Software Summit about how state is not evil, and Simon Roberts provided a lot of insight into stuff about Web services. And a few other topics. It all seemed pretty darned insightful to me, anyway. ;>

I think that what The Big Picture would give someone who knows basic J2EE already is some help explaining the concepts to people who don't get them. Obvoiusly these people should have my book anyway ;> But you tend to meet people on the fly who need to be told that the container is like a stern but protective private secretary who doesn't let anyone see the boss. Boom, they go "oh, I get it," or at least my reviewers did.

Plus it's a funny book. And everyone needs that, right? ;>

Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.
And occasional references to badgers.
 
Solveig Laura Haugland
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Originally posted by Alvin chew:
hi, solveig , is this book contain guide on IDE or tools for j2ee development also ? thank you very much !



Hi Alvin,

No, the target audience, or the primary target audience, doesn't use IDEs. So we don't cover'em.

Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.
And occasional references to badgers.
 
Solveig Laura Haugland
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Originally posted by Glenn Castro:
Sun has free tutorial on their site about J2EE and covers a lot about it. What can you say about the differce of this book to the tutorial on Sun's website?



Hi Glenn,

The primary target audience for the book, which is non or semitechnical salespeople, managers, techwriters, etc., is not going to get much value from the free tutorial. The tutorial, I believe, is primarily about how to code. The Big Picture helps nontechnical people understand the stuff way before that: what a container is, why you would need one, what a reference implementation is, etc.

Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.
And occasional references to badgers.
 
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No, the target audience, or the primary target audience, doesn't use IDEs. So we don't cover'em.


If so, what should I use to run the 5% code example?

Nick
 
Solveig Laura Haugland
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Originally posted by somkiat puisungnoen:
Hi Solveig ,
I'm new in J2EE Technology, i have some question to ask you
1. In this book, Have comparation of framework are use in J2EE Developement such as Struts Framework , Spring FrameWork, Blueprint Framework ?

and Have introduction of Object-Mapping Tool for use replace for Entity bean ?



Hi,

I briefly explain struts and we explain the new 2.0 features for entity beans, but we really don't get into the tools. It's about the concepts inherent in J2EE and in application servers in general rather than getting into the tools.

2. Which goal/target of this Book ?



The goal of the book is to provide the prequel info, the "but what IS a container?" information that nobody ever really talks about, to the semitechnical and nontechnical people who work in technical companies everywhere. That's the goal and the primary audience. However, it's a nice gentle, easy to read, introduction to J2EE technologies for a programmer who hasn't used them, and we got good feedback from technical people who read the book, saying they liked it. So I guess the audience is everyone who's not already coding J2EE. ;>


Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.
And occasional references to badgers.
 
Solveig Laura Haugland
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Originally posted by Morgan Bath:


I should avoid this book. People think I am geeky enough after laughing my ass off all the way through Head First EJB.



Well, you definitely don't want Mr. Bunny's Big Cup of Java on your shelf at work. ;>

Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.
And occasional references to badgers.
 
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Originally posted by Nicholas Cheung:

If so, what should I use to run the 5% code example?

Nick



Hi Nick.
According to what Solveig wrote there are only .5% (point 5%) code examples.
[ July 21, 2004: Message edited by: angelo celeste ]
 
somkiat puisungnoen
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Part II provides more detailed info on the Web server, Web container, JSPs, sevlets, EJBs, EJB container, databases, and Web services.




In this book , Have detail of JSTL, JSF or nor ??
 
Solveig Laura Haugland
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Hi Gary,

I'm not sure if we explicitly approach the changes in technologies. But the book does approach the whole Gestalt, if you'll pardon the buzzword, of J2EE, from what a container is to the technologies to architecture.

The TOC is now posted here:
http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf

Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.
And occasional references to badgers.

http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf



Originally posted by Gary Down:
Boy oh Boy
this books seems like it is the one I need.

Coming from 20 years developing systems in many older, more direct programming languages (please don't get into a discussion about them, they are just an early part of the evolution on programming which, without them, none of this would exist).

As technoogy has changed, so too, do I need to change. Syntax, coding styles, etc.. etc.. are old and overrated arguments. Any experienced programer can come to terms with new language syntax. What we need is a good guide to new thinking, new methods, and (most of all) a nudge in the new direction.

There was little more de-humanising (a good word if it exists) than sitting down and writing unnatural machine code and slightly more readable languages, but it did give give a good understanding of the mechanics involved in software development. The aim of the game is to produce usable, reliable and trusted systems that do "the job", not examples of fancy code, pretty front ends etc.. (all of which have a place but are not the end product). So, if this book gives a good insight into changes in technological sytems, I am all for (read need) t.

Gary.

 
somkiat puisungnoen
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Thank you for content.
 
Solveig Laura Haugland
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Hi Sundeep,

#1, yes and no. The book it goes over the main qualities of service for architecture; Mark cowrote the Sun J2EE architect certification exam so we made sure we got some good architecture stuff in. ;> We explain what a pattern is and give a couple explanations of the common ones but don't really get into J2EE patterns at all.

#2, yes, we talk about the debates about entity beans, stateful session beans, etc. and also talk about the pros and cons of j2EE in general as well as Web services. We don't come down hard with recommendations in general but there is some info beyond just what beans are. We talk about how architecture is about tradeoffs and sometiems performance is less important than security, stuff like that. But not when to use which patterns.

#3, nope. ;> We talk about security but just security itself.

Thanks for the questions. TOC is here if you'd like to take a look.
http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf

Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.
And occasional references to badgers.

http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf



Originally posted by Sundeep Mohanty:




Hi,
Congrats for sharing your knowledege in this way. I hope this book will help J2EE users to understand it in a better way.
I have some question for you.
1. Is this book defing anything related to J2EE architectures and patterns.
2. One most important question I want to ask you, whether you given any focus on when to use what, i.e. the best practices. I mean to say things like when we should you ejb, when should we use entity bean, when to use which pattern and architechture. Because I thing this things are very useful when we design and write j2ee application.
3. Is your book says anything related to performance and security of J2EE application and its dependency on application servers (like websphere, weblogic, sunone, etc).

I am very curious to know all this from you and of course to read your book.

Regards,
Sundeep Mohanty.

 
Solveig Laura Haugland
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Originally posted by Srikanth Shenoy:
Hi Solveig,

Does the book contain discussions on new features in EJB 2.1 and JCA 1.5 -in detail. AFAIK, those are two really big things in 1.4

Do you cover them in a detailed manner?

Especially the MDBs with Custom Message Types &
bidirecttional JCA connectors ..

Thanks,



Hi,

We don't talk about those features. Primary goal is to get folks understanding what a container is and what a bean and a message are, so we didn't get to that end of detail.

The TOC is here, if you'd still like to see what's in the book.
http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf

Thanks,
Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.
And occasional references to badgers.

http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf
 
Solveig Laura Haugland
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Originally posted by Hanna Habashy:
Does the book cover J2EE design patterns?



Hi,

We don't cover J2EE design patterns; just a bit on what a pattern is.

I've noticed this question a fair bit; would a book with more expanded explanations of, say, the Core J2EE Patterns be useful?

Thanks,
Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.
And occasional references to badgers.
 
Solveig Laura Haugland
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Originally posted by Nicholas Cheung:

Besides the cover, could you provide us the table of content or sample chapters?

Nick



Picky, picky! ;>

http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf

Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.
And occasional references to badgers.
 
Solveig Laura Haugland
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Originally posted by Pradeep Bhat:
Solveig ,

Does the book compare J2EE 1.4 with J2EE 1.3 and tell the readers the new features introduced in 1.4 version.

Also, it would be great if TOC is available at some site. BTW, where is Mark Cade? :roll:

Thanks



Hi Pradeep,

The book does point out which features came along in 1.4, so there's no side by side explanation but it's evident.

TOC here.
http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf

Yeah, I don't know where Mark is. Probably doing architecture for the rich and famous. I'll be calling him and verbally frogmarching him over here. ;>

Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.
And occasional references to badgers.
 
Solveig Laura Haugland
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Hi,

The patterns section is really, really minimal. Just conveys the concept of a pattern. We wanted to keep the book at a nonscary length (just over 300 pages) so didn't cover any more than that.

Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.
And occasional references to badgers.



Originally posted by Nicholas Cheung:
I guess it covers a bit in part III of the book, as the auther said:


However, it may just mention the common patterns, like MVC, Service Locator, etc, individually without giving details about how those patterns migrated into a J2EE system, or how to make use of several patterns for some special purposes.

Nic

 
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Hi Authors,
is all the j2ee related technologies/methodologies/frameworks , such as AOP, JSF, Webservices , are illustrated in this book?

how is this book organised is like a manual, or tutors the concepts than giving out steps to accomplisha task?

are there good examples and sufficent exercise to work on, is there keys to answers?

does the book have sufficient code for the illustrations and is the code available online?

to design the problem and illustrate, what methodology did u use? (UML or other methodologies)?

what are your plans to update the book for the new technologies? how often will you revise the book?
 
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IntelliJ IDE Java Ubuntu
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Solveig and other authors,

Will you offer t-shirts with the cover design?
 
angelo celeste
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Vasudevan and others.

Please see my post (Disregard this....my post is no longer on javaranch. Not sure why??? )
https://coderanch.com/t/314505/EJB-JEE/java/extra-steps-should

This may clarify things.

You have to assume that a 300+ page book like this will not cover everything in great detail. It is an overview and written so that the non-technical individuals would understand.

Solveig, correct me if I am wrong.

Regards,
Angelo
[ July 21, 2004: Message edited by: angelo celeste ]
 
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Hi,

Your book might be what I need to read. I can learn all I want to about the details of stateless beans and CMPs but I still am not sure when or why I would want to use them.

At JavaOne, I asked everyone I bumped into in line or such "Why do you use EJBs." More often than not it was because their client or boss told them to.

One person said he would use them if he needed to do caching and another said he would use them if he needed fine-tuned security. That was about it.

One guy said he had a very complex and heavily hit web site and saw no need to use them.

So, what is the true compelling reason to use this technology?
 
Solveig Laura Haugland
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Originally posted by somkiat puisungnoen:


Me too.



Hi,

It's posted here. http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf

Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.
And occasional references to badgers.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0131480103
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0131480103
 
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Originally posted by Nicholas Cheung:

I am also interested in this area. Did you put a discussion on how other J2EE-related (not exactly J2EE, like Hibernate, Spring, etc) frameworks help solving the Entity bean problems? Or just simply discuss why there is a problem?

Any suggestions for those problems?

Thanks.

Nick

 
Solveig Laura Haugland
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Originally posted by Nicholas Cheung:

If so, what should I use to run the 5% code example?

Nick



You want to be able to RUN the examples? Crap.

;>

They're runnable, they're just not there to run, they're there so people can say, oh, I see, it really is just HTML with some weird looking stuff in it in a couple places.

Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.
And occasional references to badgers.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0131480103
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0131480103
 
Mark Cade
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Originally posted by Nicholas Cheung:

I am also interested in this area. Did you put a discussion on how other J2EE-related (not exactly J2EE, like Hibernate, Spring, etc) frameworks help solving the Entity bean problems? Or just simply discuss why there is a problem?

Any suggestions for those problems?

Thanks.

Nick



Nick,

This book is intended for junior developers, managers, tech writers, etc so we didn't feel it was appropriate to discuss alternative frameworks. This could be our next book, thanks for the idea.

mark
 
Nicholas Cheung
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This could be our next book, thanks for the idea


Did you plan to write the book *a small picture* or *a complete picture*?

Nick
 
Mark Cade
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Originally posted by Yves Tracy Pojol:
Hi Solveig, Mark, and Anthony,

Will you recommend this book to people who would want to be software architects or is it for non-technical people only?

thanks



That would depend on where you are starting from. If you are a MS developer or junior Java developer and just starting to get into J2EE, then yes. If you are a seasoned Java developer, then no. I see too many people just starting Java and want a quick answer in how to do architecture. My opinion is that architecture has a lot to do with experience and that is difficult to convey in a book.

mark
 
Nicholas Cheung
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They're runnable, they're just not there to run, they're there so people can say, oh, I see, it really is just HTML with some weird looking stuff in it in a couple places.


I first guess there maybe some *complete* example for illustrating the J2EE concepts. But now, I understand this is impossible (even though impossible is nothing).

Nick
 
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Originally posted by Anand Kapadi:
Hi,
Can this book be used to learn J2EE from scratch?
Thanks
Anand



Yes, it will be a fun read about all the features, then you can use the J2EE specification to get the exact details.

mark
 
Solveig Laura Haugland
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Originally posted by Nicholas Cheung:

Did you plan to write the book *a small picture* or *a complete picture*?

Nick



Oh, let's see. I feel like I'm desperately trying to understand the humor here but I'm not gettin there. ;> A complete picture...that might actually be impossible.

What we wrote is a picture taken from a small plane flying overhead, not too far above ground but you definitely can't read the lips of the people on the ground.

Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.
And occasional references to badgers.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0131480103
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0131480103
 
Solveig Laura Haugland
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Originally posted by C Kutler:
Hi,

Your book might be what I need to read. I can learn all I want to about the details of stateless beans and CMPs but I still am not sure when or why I would want to use them.

At JavaOne, I asked everyone I bumped into in line or such "Why do you use EJBs." More often than not it was because their client or boss told them to.

One person said he would use them if he needed to do caching and another said he would use them if he needed fine-tuned security. That was about it.

One guy said he had a very complex and heavily hit web site and saw no need to use them.

So, what is the true compelling reason to use this technology?




We go over reasons to use J2EE in chapter 5 on the key benefits of J2EE.
Get the Services From Lots of Sources
Changing the Application Without Writing Code
J2EE Is Java
A J2EE System Is Financially Scalable
You Get Automatic RMI

We also talk about what Web services are good for, how they're like other technologies, why they're slow, etc.

Another relevant chapter is "Does a Cup of J2EE in the Morning Always Smell Like Victory?" Sections in that chapter include addressing issues like
Should You Be Doing the J2EE Jig of Joy
When All You Have Is a Spoon, Everything Looks Like Ice Cream
You Don�t Need to Go All the Way
J2EE Debates (entity beans, stateful session beans)
It Doesn�t Hurt to Consult an Expert

Mark, any thoughts on this?

Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0131480103
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0131480103
 
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This sounds perfect for someone like me (just getting into learning about J2EE). Is it possible for you to explain specifically how you address the pros & cons that you present? I'm curious as to the approach and how analytical you are with it. Perhaps you can provide a basic example?
 
Solveig Laura Haugland
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Originally posted by Stacey Roach:
This sounds perfect for someone like me (just getting into learning about J2EE). Is it possible for you to explain specifically how you address the pros & cons that you present? I'm curious as to the approach and how analytical you are with it. Perhaps you can provide a basic example?



We're not incredibly analytical. But it goes something like this. Take stateful session beans. They are, yes, typcally slower. But sometimes you have to store state. There's no way around it. When you do, you can do it a few different ways. Stateful session beans might be slow in terms of performance in that instance, but is performance everything? Is screaming speed what you need? If you also need other qualities of service like extensibility and maintainability, those might be more important. So you need to evaluate, so to speak, the big picture of your architecture before joining the "Get Out of Town, Stateful Session Beans!" brigade with their pitchforks and torches.

That's the general approach. Open up the picture, remind people of other things. We dont' come down for sure one way or another because as they say, for every complex problem there is a simple solution that is wrong.

Mark, any thoughts?

Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.
And occasional references to badgers.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0131480103
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0131480103
 
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hi Solveig,
i m looking for a book which can tie various j2ee strings(tehnologies)together .so,do you think your book would be 'the one'?
 
Solveig Laura Haugland
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Originally posted by Ankur Jain:
hi Solveig,
i m looking for a book which can tie various j2ee strings(tehnologies)together .so,do you think your book would be 'the one'?



I think it's the one for you! We have a chapter just on a simple walkthrough of a sample app showing how the different technologies can work together, so there's that. And we talk about how the technologies are different, similar, what each is good at, etc.

Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.
And occasional references to badgers.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0131480103
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0131480103
 
Mark Cade
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Originally posted by Solveig Laura Haugland:



We go over reasons to use J2EE in chapter 5 on the key benefits of J2EE.
Get the Services From Lots of Sources
Changing the Application Without Writing Code
J2EE Is Java
A J2EE System Is Financially Scalable
You Get Automatic RMI

We also talk about what Web services are good for, how they're like other technologies, why they're slow, etc.

Another relevant chapter is "Does a Cup of J2EE in the Morning Always Smell Like Victory?" Sections in that chapter include addressing issues like
Should You Be Doing the J2EE Jig of Joy
When All You Have Is a Spoon, Everything Looks Like Ice Cream
You Don�t Need to Go All the Way
J2EE Debates (entity beans, stateful session beans)
It Doesn�t Hurt to Consult an Expert

Mark, any thoughts on this?

Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0131480103
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0131480103




When you talk "Why use EJBs", I'm assuming you mean Entity Beans. Entity Beans are just another component available for you to use. Not every component needs to be used in every architecture. As you architect your solution you will determine which components when pieced together will provide the quality of service desired by the system. In some instances, you may only need JSPs talking JDBC to the DB and another may require the addition of Session Beans and then another my need Entity Beans for caching and sharing of data. Let the requirements dictate the necessity for components.

mark
 
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hi, solveig ..i have go though the table of contents , about the chapter17-j2EE security , do you guide on how encryption be done or just basic explaination ?
 
Alvin chew
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what database will be introduced as example in this book ?
 
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Originally posted by Alvin chew:
what database will be introduced as example in this book ?



I am sure that no database introduction will be done. :roll:
 
Solveig Laura Haugland
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Originally posted by Alvin chew:
hi, solveig ..i have go though the table of contents , about the chapter17-j2EE security , do you guide on how encryption be done or just basic explaination ?



Hi,

We provide an analogy for why encryption works but that's all. Needed to keep the book under 1000 pages. ;>

Solveig
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
solveig@bigpicture-books.com
www.bigpicture-books.com

http://www.bigpicture-books.com/bigpicturetoc.pdf

"J2EE: The Big Picture" by Solveig Haugland, Mark Cade, and Anthony Orapallo
Knowledge without coding.
Understanding without boredom.
And occasional references to badgers.

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0131480103
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/0131480103
 
yeah, but ... what would PIE do? Especially concerning this tiny ad:
Building a Better World in your Backyard by Paul Wheaton and Shawn Klassen-Koop
https://coderanch.com/wiki/718759/books/Building-World-Backyard-Paul-Wheaton
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