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patrick kimwaki
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i dont have a computer for practice .i am preparing for jcp exam
how much computer practice is required and is it possible to pass the exam without practical experience
patrick
 
Emmanuel Bakare
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Hi Simon,
Sorry I could not explain the question well enough.
My simple question is How do I start a server on my local machine? I am using Microsoft internet Explorer.
Second question(though not related to Servlet or JSP)
Is it possible for me to do a work placement in your company? I am a Sun certified Java Programmer with about 4 years AS400 RPG400, RPGIV ILE Experience but no commercial Java Experience.
Regards Emmanuel Bakare.
(My Email is ecjbakare@aol.com)
 
Desai Sandeep
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Originally posted by P Subramanian:
Hi brown,
The same can be achieved if the service method is synchronized. What is the purpose of using the Single Thread model then?

Subramanian,
The SingleThreadModel creates a pool of servlet instances to handle the requests.Considering a moderate web traffic, this model gives better performance when compared to synchronized model.The reason being, in the latter case, the request would be serviced in a serialized manner.However, in the case of the former, the requests are handled in a parallel manner by the instances created by the Servlet engine.
However, I would add that both the models are not adequate when you consider high web traffic.Probably the use of inner classes is a better way to solve synchronization problems.
Hope this helps,
Sandeep
 
Desai Sandeep
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Hi Simon,
Welcome to JavaRanch!
It is great to have you here.I would like to take this opportunity to clear some of my queries through you.

I have been trying to draw a line between taglibs and JavaBeans for quite sometime now.I have fairly convinced myself that taglibs should be used more as a "rendering HTML class", while the JavaBean should be used more as a "domain logic class" (considering that Servlet + JSP + taglib + JavaBean is my model.I am ignoring EJB for the moment).
Am I on track, or is there some other side to it?


Also, are there any Design Patterns which suggest what could be put in the taglib and what should be reserved for JavaBeans?
Looking forward for your comments,
Thanks in advance,
Sandeep
Made the part of my message in Italics, for which I found your reply on a similar query raised by Tim in this Thread..Thanks!
[This message has been edited by Desai Sandeep (edited July 18, 2001).]
 
Bart Tubalinal
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Originally posted by Simon Brown:
Hi Tim,
At the end of the day, it comes down to personal preference and whether your chosen toolset does the job. If so, there's no point in changing.
However, there are other factors that come into play. For example, our clients tend to look at building high performance, scalable, maintainable component based systems. They have chosen Java/J2EE as their platform on which to do this as it can deliver on all of these requirements. There are many more besides this...
From my perspective, I got into Java over four years ago because it (and its potential) interested me and that's still holding true. It is partly the language, but there's also the other pieces of the puzzle such as the design patterns, the J2EE patterns, architectures for distributed systems and also, the way that "elegant" solutions can be designed and implemented.
This of course all overlaps on to JSPs too. I first saw JSPs at JavaOne (1999 I think) and to be honest, I wasn't impressed at all as it seemed like just another way of building pages to generate dynamic HTML content. However, as the specifications have been enhanced and improved, JSPs are now a very effective tool for building and delivering dynamic content. Couple JSPs with custom tag extensions, JavaBeans, Servlets and the rest of the J2EE and you have a very powerful toolkit.
That's my thoughts ... what does everybody else think?
Simon


I agree that the best reason to consider using the JSP/Java framework is to have the ability to build highly-scalable systems. You can start from the very bottom of the scale, like a system designed for wireless devices (using J2ME) and extend it to work on the J2EE level. Am I on the right track?
 
Bart Tubalinal
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Simon,
I had this same problem:
Originally posted by niranjan pulipati:
Hai simon,
I have a small problem. I have a variable in JavaScript and without submitting the page i want tuse that value of the variable in JSP code.. Is it possible if so please give me solution..
Thanks & Regards
Niranjan

After several attempts to make my code work, I decided to just redo the code because I didn't think it would be possible (JavaScript runs on the client, JSP runs on the server). Is there a way to get around this? I know in ASP, there is the runAt="server" command. Is there something similar to jsp?
Bart
 
Trevor Dunn
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Hi Simon
I write a lot of JSP and servlet stuff and I think it is a great technology. However it is still hard sometimes to keep the Java code out of the JSP page, even with custom tags and beans. I have been reading a little on JSP template engines like the Struts framework and am wondering what you think about it.
It seems to me that these frameworks just requires programmers to learn yet another custome scripting language. I would love to hear your thoughts on this.
Thanks
Trevor
 
ta ton
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If you don't have a computer then how do you learn java? from books? I don't think learn java from books will be enough for exam. It's not hard to get a PC now a day.
 
Dave Van Even
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Hi Simon,
I'm hoping you don't mind if I ask you a technical question. (feels like asking the american president how to get a driving license )
I'm stuck with this problem; how do you send a JSP back to the client with gzip or zip encoding ???
I tried using a servlet with the right mapping and extra path information, but things don't work out...
we had this discussion at: http://www.javaranch.com/ubb/Forum7/HTML/001093.html
thanks!!
PS: does your book cover stuff like this ? I'm planning on buying one..
 
Kausik Ghosh
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Hi Simon,
Best wishes on the launch of your new book :-)
Am currently trying to fathom out the new servlet 2.3 specification which has a lot to do with filtering... questions will follow soon ... ;-)
Cheers
Kausik
 
Simon Brown
sharp shooter, and author
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Just to let you know, there's two whole chapters in the book that talk about filters and filtering...
Regards
Simon
Originally posted by Kausik Ghosh:
Hi Simon,
Best wishes on the launch of your new book :-)
Am currently trying to fathom out the new servlet 2.3 specification which has a lot to do with filtering... questions will follow soon ... ;-)
Cheers
Kausik


------------------
Simon Brown
Co-author of Professional JSP 2nd Edition
 
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