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World's Youngest SCJP

 
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Afsah, im just wondering why you would ask people to pray for you. And why are you making such a huge deal out of this? I understand your 12 and thats a great accomplishment to achieve so much at such a young age. But you are far from alone as being a smart young kid.
 
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Originally posted by Sahir Shibley:
Stevie Kaligis is the youngest SCJP in the world. He is 8 years old.


Sahir
This is the dirtiest trick that ever happen in this forum, and I personaly ask the administrator of this forum to lock Sahir's ID.
I know you might be jealous with me Sahir, but you sounds so frustrated, If you would like to talk about the problems of jealousy, don't use this forum....!!!
couz' you already announce it, I must clarifies,
I, Stevie Kaligis (10 years old now), when I was 5 years old, I start using Java Languages as my daily languages.
and when I was 8 years old, I've been forced to take the SCJP (Sahir's Certified Jealous Personality)... and I Passed

 
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Hee hee hee!
Shama, thank you for being the voice of reason here.
Stevie and Sahir, thank you for the entertainment.
I'm going on a three week vacation soon...without a computer. Three weeks without the wonderful insanity of this forum! How will I manage ?
By the way, I wonder who is the world's oldest SCJP?
 
Stevie Kaligis
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Originally posted by Rosie Vogel:
By the way, I wonder who is the world's oldest SCJP?


Grandpa Rahul Rathore is the oldest SCJP in the world (He is 83 years old), Grandpa Jim Yingst is the second (he is 79 years old), Grandma Angela Poynton is the third (she is ... years old)
the world's handsome SCJP is Mr.Bean ...
the world's ugliest SCJP is Sahir Shibley ...

[This message has been edited by Stevie Kaligis (edited July 12, 2001).]
 
Stevie Kaligis
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Inspired of this thread, I ask my 6 years old son to answer 60 question from one of the populer SCJP mock exam (people said it's more harder than the real exam), I told him to choose A,B,C,D, or E (even he doesn't understand any of those question)and he did very well, he scores 81%, WHOA...my 6 years old son is the world's youngest SCJP now, Any megazine will cover this story ???
 
Andy Ceponis
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I started teaching my bearded dragons the material needed for the SCJP. I should be done tomorrow and we will see how they do on a mock test. Ill keep you all updated. They are only 3 years old so they will be the youngest SCJP's in the world. Plus they will be the smallest weighing in at about a pound.
 
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Pray for me, I am Indian!
 
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I wonder if one's religion influences one's character... what I mean is, by following the tenets of your religion, would that tend to form a behavior pattern in you? The way you think, the way you talk, the way you address issues... can the practice of a religion mold these?
Also, can the practice of a certain religion give a predisposition towards specialization in some field? This can sound like a stereotypical comment, but there's a general view that Jews are good at business. If that is true, how did they get to be that way? Did their religion help?
 
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So Nanjangud, would you like some more kindling to pile onto this topic, or shall we light it now? Seriously, I know I can count on you to keep civil (well almost always ) but the topics you raise seem sure to invite some less polite responses. I'll have a fire hose ready just in case. Anyway...
> The way you think, the way you talk, the way you address
> issues... can the practice of a religion mold these?
I imagine so - the younger you are, the more effect it would have. But other factors are significantly more important I think - like what is the actual observed behavior of the parents, as opposed to whatever they are telling their kids is good or bad. What sort of peers and role models does the child have to interact with? In the US at least, I think television and other media have a lot more influence on young minds than religious practices do. And where there is influence from religion, it isn't always what you might expect. It's not unsusal for a strict religious background to lead to lead to rebellion as the child matures. Which may or may not be a temporary phase.
> ...there's a general view that Jews are good at business.
> If that is true, how did they get to be that way?
> Did their religion help?
There's a section in the Bible (John 2:13-16) where Jesus goes into a temple (Jewish of course) and finds moneylenders there. He drives them out and admonishes them to keep their business out of his father's house. This was taken by many Christians as an indication that moneylending is a Bad Thing, which good Christians were not supposed to get involved in. Which meant that as Christianity rose in influence, there was a growing shortage of good moneylenders. Fortunately most European cities had a small community of people who were free from this onerous restriction, and thus Jews became the dominant force in banking in Europe. This tended to translate into general financial success in the community, which in turn led to increased chance of success in other forms of business as well. All of which led to a fair amount of resentment among the good Christians who chose the (allegedly more noble) route of worldly poverty. Which of course led to all sorts of other things that we don't really want to get into here. (Errr... if it isn't already too late...)
Bottom line- sure, religion can create cultural pressures which can influence likely career paths of members of that religion. Or in some cases, for certain cast... ahem... classes of people within a religion. But we probably don't want to get into that either. (Or if we do, I'll leave it to someone who understands the details a lot better than I do.)
Naturally, many of the details in the preceding paragraphs may be grossly oversimplified, or downright wrong. My apologies for any major errors I've committed. Hopefully though this can lead to an interesting ongoing discussion in which people can remember to keep their cool and avoid gratuitous insults to others...
> We are utterly dedicated to a serious non-partisan approach to
> the ecumenical ecclesiastic issues that currently affect the
> world's religions, and we handle this with amazing alacritous
> acumen, and are renowned for our circumlocutory skills in
> handling these issues.
NN, I think you had entirely too much fun in composing that paragraph. With anyone else I'd question if "circumlocutory" was really the word you meant to use, but of course I have no such doubts where you're concerned.
In an unrelated note, thanks to Shama for a particularly reasonable and also entertaining post. I disagree a bit with your "bless you" analogy (it's more like "bless me! Did you rembember to bless me? Thanks to those who remembered to bless me!") but in general your points are well taken.
 
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lets start talking about the streams part of the cert (and religion?) and see if we can get the conversation moved there too...
Dave
 
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Hi NN,
which dictionary to lookup?
jyts

[This message has been edited by Manju Jain (edited July 13, 2001).]
 
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umm....
I really have nothing constructive to say (not that yall do either). I just need 7 more posts before I can become a prestigous Ranch Hand so I thought I'd put one here.
mmm....let's see....*thinking really hard* Nope, I still have nothing constructive to say.
 
Nanjangud Nanjundaiah
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>seem sure to invite some less polite responses
Now you've discouraged all the less polite responders. We need to spice this up, and bring them back
>It's not unusual for a strict religious background to lead to rebellion as the child matures
This is generally good when the rebellion is against the "shackles" of religion... but when the rebellion is in the name of religion... we know the kind of insanity it can cause.
>There's a section in the Bible
That's interesting history - assuming that's how it all happened. Daniel has another view, which is possible too. And like you just stopped short of saying , the classification of the society into castes/classes, like among Hindus, clearly assigned roles to people. I wonder if other religions have similar "classes".
Also, I think when people are influenced by studying history, and learning that their ancestors have always been denied equality, or oppressed upon (this could have been true, or those ancestors were simply never happy with what they had)... it sows the seeds of hatred in their minds, ultimately causing entire generations to carry on centuries-old rivalry. In such cases, the more introvert amongst them, would then seek every chance to prove that they are equals, or even better than their rivals, and would attempt boosting morale with shows of fervid support for their clan...
>I'd question if "circumlocutory" was really the word you meant to use
Just having some fun
>thanks to Shama for a particularly reasonable
Shama, I find your posts usually reasonable quite in contrast to some others. How much do you think has growing up in the US influenced your ideas? Do you think if you had remained in Pakistan, your views may have been different? Or perhaps, it's the influence of your parents which has molded you, so it wouldn't matter where you grew up?
>which dictionary to lookup?
Manju, I was just packing obscure words into that paragraph. The meaning of circumlocutory gives a clue about what I was doing I usually use Merriam-Webster Online. Another good source is Cambridge Dictionaries Online which in addition to International and American English dictionaries, also features searching for Idioms and Phrases - pretty neat.
 
Greenhorn
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<MARQUEE>CONGRATULATIONS TO WORLD'S YOUNGEST SCJP.. INDIAN BOY... WASIM ANWAR</MARQUEE>
I am wasim anwar from islamabad , pakistan , congratulations to ratul , I regret to say that as always , once again ,India has beaten pakistan here also , when will pakistan grow up? will pakistan be another afghanistan ??oh allah please help us , and <h3>pray for us</h3>

-------------------------------------
Hello All,
My name is Ratul Banerjee.I am a 11 years old boy(my DOB is 26th of Feb. 1988) and study at St.Xavier's School,Calcutta in 7th grade.I am also studying Java Programming in some place.By god name I have cleared my SCJP2 exam on 28th of June 2001 by 72% marks.This is just to inform you all.Pray for me.
Sorry pakistani girl..I am the youngest SCJP now !
Thanks
Ratul
----------------------------------
 
Andy Ceponis
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Wow, thats some really impressive big colors.
 
Jim Yingst
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Wasim, by posting this here you're just creating more confusion. Is that your goal? You should realize that this thread has no previous mention of Ratul's claim, and your message makes it look like you are claiming to be the world's youngest SCJP. Perhaps you meant to say "CONGRATULATIONS TO WORLD'S YOUNGEST SCJP.. RATUL BANNERJEE"? Since you seem to believe his claim? Regardless, anyone who actually cares about this should read the thread here to understand what Wasim is talking about.
As for the Jewish history discussion... I think the versions posted by Daniel and myself are actually complementary, and don't really contradict each other. Mine accounts more for the tendency for Jews to be associated with banking; Daniel's info (which has the ring of truth to me; I think I've heard it elsewhere) accounts for their association with business in general. Note that in my account, I said vaguely that success in banking led to success in other forms of business as well. That was really just a guess on my part, which still seems reasonable. But being barred from owning land seems to offer an even stronger reason for Jews to specialize in businesses. I am certain that the story I referenced is in the Bible, and that historically this discouraged Christians from being involved in banking. However, I don't know if this was the initial or primary reason Jews became more associated with banking. Perhaps there were other causes, and the bible story was conveniently remembered by Christians later as a way of saying "well, we didn't want to ba good bankers anyway". After all, there's a lot of selective memory about which parts of the bible are obeyed, and which are not.
In any event, a common thread to both Daniel's version and mine is that it wasn't some much the Jews as the Christians who were responsible for the Jews becoming associated with banking and business. Of course, I suspect that the Jewish cultural emphasis on education might have had some effect on their tendency to succeed in banking as business, as well. There's a lot of overlapping causes and effects here - I don't really know which are the primary causes, and which are effects, or which are simply coincidences.
[re: Hinduism]
> I wonder if other religions have similar "classes".
Hmmm... I don't know of any that are really comparable. Other religions have distinctions between priests and laymen, or have different levels of spiritual enlightenment - but I don't know any in which these classes/levels are considered to be established at birth, other than Hinduism. But I'm hardly an expert on world religions - perhaps others can offer examples?
 
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I would like to address the banking profession of many in the Jewish community. I think it is so because usury was originally forbidden in Christianity. So banking as a profession wouldn't be attractive to any that practiced a religion where usury was forbidden. It is true also in Islam but hasn't been overturned yet as in Christianity.
By the way, in Islam usury is akin to committing rape since it's the basest way of taking advantage of someone who is obviously in need (ie. in the situation of lending money). Some will say, but we get interest when we put our money in the bank. And my response would be, how come the bank gives you much less interest for your money but charges you a much higher percentage when it lends you money. That's the unfairness and the reason why banking is such a profitable business.
As an aside, most muslim countries practice modern day banking and therefore I always like to tell people that there is no such thing an "Islamic" country. And if one does find a country where usury is forbidden then that country would probably be an "un-Islamic" country due to its cultural practices which for the most part would be anti-Islamic.
Didn't mean to change the topic, someone wondered about whether I would be a different person if I grew up in Pakistan rather than U.S. Of course, I would be. Growing up in U.S. has been a different experience. However, a lot of my personality has been
shaped by listening to stories of my great-grandfather who I have never met. I have been told that I am very much like him. He was a quiet, open minded and liberal person. He acted in a responsible manner throughout his life. I am striving for that.
In conclusion, I would say family/friends and culture/religion being practiced at home are more responsible for making a person than the environment outside the home.
Of course, that does depend on when your curfew ends.
Shama
 
Nanjangud Nanjundaiah
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Do you think Christianity has anything to do with the "white" people becoming generally more developed and prosperous?
On a parallel subject, I am always amazed thinking about the English. How did they get to rule over so many countries in the world, at one point in time? Theirs is such a tiny nation... but their influence spread far and wide. What's their secret? Religion? Monarchy?
There's another thing that puzzles me. I will try to word this with caution. I have read through the Bible once. And was quite shocked to encounter so many references to sex and sexual matters. Not exactly what I expected to see in a "holy" book... could someone explain?
 
Rosie Vogel
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Well, I suppose a book that is supposed to tell certain people how they should live their lives has to deal with sex too. It is an important part of life after all.
Personally I was shocked at all the violence in the bible. I can't really say which book or verse I'm referring too because it's been a while since I last looked at my bible. But I remember thinking: does it have to be this bloody?
 
Andy Ceponis
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I am happy to report that my bearded dragons have just passed the SCJP exam!!! It took them a while to grasp the whole constructor thing, but after that it was smooth sailing.
Woot!!! the youngest and smallest SCJP's in the WORLD!!!
Pray for me and my dragons!!
 
Jake the Snake
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Andy, are your bearded dragons maybe of Indian descent?
I would be really hard to believe that they are not.
BTW, I am already praying for them.
J
 
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Have any Bearded Monkey Midgets passed the exam?
 
Nanjangud Nanjundaiah
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>Well, I suppose a book that is supposed to tell certain people how they should live their lives has to deal with sex too.
The Hindus decided to keep sex out of their holy books. That's when Vatsyayana decided to write the Kamasutra
(Speaking of which, I got reminded of a joke, probably from some Woody Allen movie, where this guy makes a comment on similarities among the various positions described, and says something like: "Then I realized the difference between position #23 and position #56 is that the woman has her fingers crossed in position #56.")
 
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I Still dont believe you afsa .. dont feel bad but still its hard to believe unless you get proper proof
 
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Congrats Afsah dearess....
Then u wanna b a higly skilled developer, right?
------------------
Muhammad Ashikuzzaman (Fahim)
Sun Certified Programmer for the Java� 2 Platform
--When you learn something, learn it by heart!
 
Andy Ceponis
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Good news. My pet lizards have now acquired their SCJP, SCJD, and SCJE certifications. And they are only 4 years old. And have a brain the size of our small toes. Woot!
 
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Andy this person has you beat youngest
 
Stevie Kaligis
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I passed SCJP with 83%,
I'm planing to try one more time (my target score is 92%),
it will make my total score 175%...
yee haa...I'm the highest score SCJP's.
if somebody beat me, I'm willing to take the third to increase my total score...
Sorry Andy, Paul's wright "Mothers Womb" beat your pet lizards.
 
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