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EZ: FANTASTIC lighting! One has to be an artist in blood/in soul to create such a fabulous photo.
What does that rope near the woman's feet represent? She is not about to hang herself, is she? I mean, she looks like a decent lady and all, -- would be a shame.
 
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but technically, I think somehow it's even more difficult than manipulating brushes and oil.


Sarah Brightman as model in a medieval frock , add some bad lighting placed in a medieval cellar and you just might be able to capture it. The lighting may be a problem.It has an inky fluid-quality darkness to it. Perhaps there's no lighting but the diffused lighting of a flash ?
The animal with the skin of a sheep and head of a large mouse may be difficult to create.
I like the B&W Jan Martin 2002 image of China, best.
regards
[ September 30, 2003: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
 
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Originally posted by Eugene Kononov:

What does that rope near the woman's feet represent? She is not about to hang herself, is she? I mean, she looks like a decent lady and all, -- would be a shame.


Here is an interesting comment of this photo, Eugene you will like it

Several aspects of this image strike me (none of which are perhaps original).
In terms of stylisation, I struggle to make sense of images like this. Whatever period it derives from, it is the concrete present which I hope bears no reference to vaunting of this much admired woman. For what strikes me most in the image is how death invades the whole scene. The light-painting effect reveals the woman from the darkness of her surroundings and in classical seductress style; her right hand pointing towards her right leg, revealed in the fold of a red dress which extends from the centre of the image into man's righthand side. It is there the viewer's entry to this image is apprehended as alluring. Perhaps clich�d, but sensually erotic nonetheless, and erotic in the perturbation of the male mind which therefore asks: "wherefore does madame hide her left leg?"
Yet what is hidden is purposefully posed: its absence reveals the arrogance of the left hand which is unequivocally self-referential: the narcissism of the woman's posture is revealed in her blearing and contemptuous boredom at being imaged by the viewer or photographer. Why this portrayal of casual nonechalance? Perhaps it only makes sense to me when I trace my eye around around her body (so then the photographer' skill has seduced me) and find her beautifully enclosed in subtle brickwork; other arrangements closing in around her. So there is no escape from, the dominant subject; her back to a brickwall of a background and the closure of the foreground by the trailing rope. Perhaps this is the suicidal noose by which she is to hang; like all beautiful objects; this one is to be admired; dare she move, her fragile life may end, and with it, the viewer's adoration. Perhaps she has failed in public life and retreats to her last stand. How therefore do I come to this extreme admiration? It is the most paradoxical finding of all in this image which derives my extreme view that this image is tainted by death; what could be artifact - a domestic animal, a bag or sack of potatoes forms in my mind as an analogue of Holbein's Ambassadors skull whose death brings life to the image of the woman. This is grasped in visual Gestalt. Look how at the foundation of the image; underneath the seat of the seductress an apparition of a fragmentary face _ a shadow of a man's dark left eye peering back at the viewer, haunting the image with meaning and ominous ambiguity (so the left hand of darkness is replete in this image - in man and woman). In the fearful triangular emblem whose dark eye glares back at me I am struck by the superfical contrast to the nonchalance of the woman's expression. And of course, the minutiae of this detail is the inversion of the triangular space which the model sits encased in; her space is one of adoration, yet the suicidal noose of the rope embracing her feet recall for me how desperately doomed this farewell portrait might appear. Thus the abstract emblem of death is unified with the sensual corporeal form of the seductress.
Does this move me therefore - the fate of a seductress so beautifully wrought with emblematic richness in an imitation of a light study?
Any postmodern feminist would be appalled by my interpretation; have I nothing to say about headdress and necks, bangles and baskets? You do not wish to hear what I have to say about costume. Perhaps then I would invite such critics to hang themselves at the foot of this seductress - there is plenty of rope.
Kind regards,
-- Jason Stephens



@HS Thomas:
Here is the homepage of the photographer of the third photo. Click the link "Die Technik" you can see how he manipulates his "Lightbrush".
Shortly put, the subject is in total darkness, you open the bulb and then paint the subject with your "lightbrush"(some special light source, but never never flash) and capture the whole thing in one or multiple exposures in the same frame, and the focus could be changed between one exposure and another.
Light is more difficult to control than painting brush and oil, the duration of the each exposure is also not easy to set, and characters of different films varies. And you don't see the result until the photo is developed and printed, if anything went wrong you cannot modify it easily but have to start all over. So, painting with lightbrush really need a lot experience!
Go back to the cleanliness topic. My new Dutch speaking room mate from Belgium never makes any fuss on cleanliness, we live the way we live and are happy with each other. It appears to me that women from Russia pay great attention to cleanliness and always want to change the way others live. Olena is not the only one, when I was in Paris, I met a couple from Germany. The lady was a Russian immigration. We found a hotel and met on the second morning. The first greeting from the lady was "was your room clean enough? I found mein not clean! I had to wash everything in the bathroom and cleaned the floor....." I stayed there could not say any words, no idea about her question, I didn't pay attention to whether the room is clean or not at all. Then in the evening they wanted to try out McDonald, we went there and she could hardly find any place to sit down, she kept saying this was dirty and that was not thoroughly washed. Our burgers finished in her complaint of the dirtiness of the McDonald, which I thought was totally okay. She also asked me whether restaurants in China are as dirty as this McDonald, again I had no idea, I could only tell the food there are a lot better, but I never counted the spots on the floor. On our way back to Germany they invited me to their home, the lady said " our home is not large but you can be sure it's very clean..." well I was scared I didn't dare to go. Olena told me she met a girl from Ukraine whom she admire very much, because she fold her dirty clothes nicely before she threw them into the washmachine.....Here I have a question for Map, do most of Russian women really consider cleanliness a vital value? Olena told me so. :roll:
Regards,
Ellen
errata for my early posts above: bathroom was spelled as badroom, this mistake roots on das Badzimmer == the bathroom, das Zimmer == the room, but I forgot the word for "das Bad" in English, the result was the weird word badroom. Too lazy to correct them.....
[ October 02, 2003: Message edited by: Ellen Zhao ]
 
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do most of Russian women really consider cleanliness a vital value?
Some more than other, but I've never seen anything close to what you described. Keep in mind that cleaning supplies weren't in abundance in Russia, so the task used to be more difficult and there is still 24 hours in a typical Russian day. From my experience, Russians are more tolerant to dirth. "I had to wash everything in the bathroom and cleaned the floor..." in a hotel room -- looks like a nervous breakdown. Unless it was a particularly bad hotel.
 
Ellen Zhao
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but that is true! The third day she got sick, I guessed maybe it was becaused she was too clean at home. We went there by a bus group. Most of the members lived in a 2 star hotel, the same hotel didn't have any 3-bed room for her family(they traveled with their little son), the guide took them to a 3 star hotel. In my hotel it was quite clean(to my standard), no idea about hers.
But it was in France, it could happen that the cleaners in the hotel were on a strike.....my father had been to France twice, he was lucky, he saw big cleaner stikes in the airport of Paris both times! The whole airport was like a huge rubbish can, and it smelled really terrible, the travelers could not stand it and ran out of the airport.....

Regards,
Ellen
 
Ellen Zhao
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Originally posted by Mapraputa Is:

Keep in mind that cleaning supplies weren't in abundance in Russia, so the task used to be more difficult and there is still 24 hours in a typical Russian day.



I remember one of the quarrels between O and me, she asked me whether Chinese people don't have the tradition of cleaning floor with hot water, soap and cloth. I said I didn't think so. Because in early years we were poor, we could not afford that, we didn't have hot running water 24 hours a day and soap had not been invented yet. She said, true! In Russia too! In winter sometimes even the cold water was a problem. But, they still managed to fetch the water from far far away, then make the water hot and make the floor clean......then the conclusion was Chinese people are not as clean as Russian people, or Chinese people are lazier than Russian people, we should learn from Russian people.....
Months before she left she started worry when she left who was going to continue to discipline us. She asked me whether I knew I was being trained by her...now our mop is being used again and her cloth for cleaning the floor was thrown away
[ October 02, 2003: Message edited by: Ellen Zhao ]
 
John Smith
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Chinese people are not as clean as Russian people, or Chinese people are lazier than Russian people, we should learn from Russian people.....
Well, the Chineese did learn from the Russians: Mao Tsedun, cultural revolution, communism, personality cult, dogmatism, and repressions.
do most of Russian women really consider cleanliness a vital value?
Not really. Most Russian men like Russian women dirty:
 
HS Thomas
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Thanks Ellen.
I followed your link on Die Technik - "light Brushing" seems a very advanced technique and produces amazing results.(So that's what Fotograferen get up to in their dark rooms). Not only do I have BabelFish as a translator but Babylon now. With Babylon you click on a word and get simultaneous translations to any number of languages of your choice. Even to Babylon and Hmongo. By using the word Fotograferen in what's English text I have now restricteded the context to German photographers but Babylon tells me that this is also a Flemish word. And gives me the country's flag against each translation.
Why is it that most translators have very good Chinese translations but are very bad in other languages ? I tried translating "Thomas John Paul" to various languages.Only the Chinese translation came back very quickly with what looked like convincing results. Others drew a blank. You'd think names are translatable or transliterable.

Perhaps then I would invite such critics to hang themselves at the foot of this seductress - there is plenty of rope.


So that's what the rope suggests !
regards
[ October 02, 2003: Message edited by: HS Thomas ]
 
Mapraputa Is
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You'd think names are translatable or transliterable.
This is an interesting theoretical question. We already had a discussion about the best way of transliterating "Pavić", here is another twist on the subject.
 
Seriously Rick? Seriously? You might as well just read this tiny ad:
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