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Festivals and economy

 
Ranch Hand
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It's good to be precise to the hour:min:second. Do the Hindu's use a different time to predict horoscopes or have they switched to GMT.
Hope you don't mind my asking. I'm curious that's all.
regards
 
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they use IST (Indian Standard Time, +5.5 GMT).
And believe whole Hindu society runs on the Horoscope and which is very much precise.
 
Ranch Hand
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RK: Hi Bhau I might have soon a trip to Mumbai/Pune
Welcome! Sorry i am not in mumbai right now or else we could have met.
RK: AW lets come to the point, Which calendar do you follow to celeberate your b'day ??
We celebrate our birthdays twice a year Once according to gregorian calendar (party with friends) and once according to hindu calendar (with immediate family members)
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HST: How many days between this Karwa Chauth and the next ?
Usually, a year is somewhere around 336 to 360 days (12 months * 28 or 30 days each approximately based on lunar positions.) Every third year or every fourth year i forgot, we have an "extra month" called as 'adhhik maas' to make up for the solar year. Which is kind of a leap year with one full month instead of just one day extra.
HST: How does one measure age in the Hindu Calendar. I expect it's roughly the same as age in the Gregorian Calendar.
So each year the age in the Hindu Calendar is ahead of the Gregorain by a few days, cuts down and aligns with it in a couple of years, then falls behind a few days sometimes and then catches up again. The cycle keeps repeating.
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RK: Yes, roughly same (+/- 6-8 months for 100yrs[a wild guess])
I dont think this is the case. For example the festival of Diwali is sometimes in mid-November one year, then it is in first week of November another year, then last week of October the next year, and then goes back again to mid-November. I don't think we ever had or will ever have Diwali in March, April, or something like that (but i could be wrong).
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JY: So for me, the exact anniverary of an event was never important, but whatever ou're commenorating is. That didn't really change when I decided on atheism, except that some of the things I used to commemorate had lost their importance to me.
hmmm..
JY: Religion is all around; can't avoid it. I just try to minimize its effect on me.
Okay.
[ October 17, 2003: Message edited by: Mumbai cha bhau ]
 
HS Thomas
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Thanks Mumbai cha bhau and RK.
IST must be rather recent so wondered what system ws used to measure time.

regards
 
Leverager of our synergies
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Baghdad blogger has an interesting entry on he problem of what to do with old holidays when a society moves on:

I do actually think that it would be a good idea to start superimposing new "events" on old ones. This is actually the best way to clear the markings history makes on certain dates, to just say "it is no more" does not really work. I think it did happen in the Soviet Union where they just adopted the old holidays and gave them new names. Look at the Kurds and Nawruz [unislamic and banned by the Taliban] they still celebrate it, it's meaning was changed so that peole later on forgot where it came from. The same should happen to our old national holidays. It is going to be very difficult to make people really just ignore the 7th of april or the 17th of july, all your life these dates have been engraved on your skull from the inside, so the best thing to do is give them new meanings, new reasons to celebrate.

 
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Indeed, replacing an old occasion with a new one is a tried & true strategy. Easter, for example, is a Christian holiday grafted on top of various prexisting pagan traditions generally involviing rebirth and fertility. When converting people to christianity, the chruch sometimes found it difficult to get people to drop old beliefs entirely, and instead found it easier to co-opt existing holidays as part of Christian tradition. Hence Easter eggs, which have nothing really to do with Christianity, but are symbols from pagan fertility celebrations. Or the Christmas tree, which derives from a burning Yule Log associated with winter solstice.
 
Anonymous
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Originally posted by HS Thomas:
IST must be rather recent so wondered what system ws used to measure time.

regards


Are you looking for some information like this. [as mentioned it must be used by mathematicians/physicists].
For common man, this is still in use.
If you are more interested in the horoscope/astronomy of ancient India.
And now something about Hindu/ancient India Panchang (Calander).
Hope you will enjoy reading all this.
And if you liked all these links then you will surely like this too.
 
HS Thomas
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Thanks Ravish : This is better than reading the EJB spec.
I wish thay had instilled some of these in there:
Wow!
7 Concepts of space, time, and matter - Vedic
Lots of short hypotheses and proof is in experience.
regards
 
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Originally posted by Jim Yingst:
...When converting people to christianity, the chruch sometimes found it difficult to get people to drop old beliefs...
church = crutch ?
 
Bartender
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Random thoughts inspired by this thread:
JY: Indeed, replacing an old occasion with a new one is a tried & true strategy. Easter, for example, is a Christian holiday grafted on top of various prexisting pagan traditions generally involviing rebirth and fertility.

In fact, the name "Easter" comes directely from the Celtic "Ostera", a minor celebration on the vernal equinox. (Mid-spring to the Celts -- they considered the first day of Spring to be Beltaine, celebrated on February 2nd. Today we call it Groundhog Day).
Hence Easter eggs, which have nothing really to do with Christianity, but are symbols from pagan fertility celebrations.
Don't forget the Easter Bunny. What could be more symbolic of fertility than rabbits?
[/B]Or the Christmas tree, which derives from a burning Yule Log associated with winter solstice.[/B]
I know that the Christmas tree is associated with Martin Luther, who may have taken it from the Yule Log, but I rather doubt it, myself. It seems to me instead that these two items are distinct but similar things that have in common the fact that both are/were trees. Instead, the Yule Log is kept alive and well as part of the Christmas celebration by people who still have trees...
And, just as a point from above, the fact that Christmas is celebrated in "mid-winter" makes more sense when you consider that Yule is the Celtic mid-winter celebration. For them, winter begins on Samhain (pronounced SA - wen), which is, of course, Halloween. (Another holiday taken over by the Church...)
Christmas was set at 25 December because that rivaled two Roman-era celebrations: the Saturnalia and the birth of Mithras.
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As far as calendars, I've been trying to imagine a non-astronomy-oriented culture and what it might consider a "year." Granted, the it doesn't take astronomy to figure out a year (agrarian culture would rely on it), but I was thinking more of a year for determining age. I was thinking that it would be interesting to have this theoretical soceity measure age in 40-week increments (the human gestation period)....
 
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