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Language Bastardisation..

 
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Originally posted by Helen Thomas:
civilization or civilisation ?



I recieved a Word document from IBM in Australia once and it drove me nuts! Every time I tried to spell a word like civilization, it kept telling me the correct spelling was civilisation. I tried dictionaries and other Word docs and they agreed with me.

I learned two things that day.

1. Australian English spellings are different in some cases than American English.
2. Word docs can have their own individual dictionaries.

Language is a beautiful thing. It always keeps you on your toes! So does technology.
[ July 30, 2004: Message edited by: Ray Marsh ]
 
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Originally posted by Ray Marsh:

I recieved a Word document from IBM in Australia once and it drove me nuts! Every time I tried to spell a word like civilization, it kept telling me the correct spelling was civilisation. I tried dictionaries and other Word docs and they agreed with me.



And I was typing civilisation and my MS-Word (by default dictionary is US english) kept telling me that its civilization.

But now I have learned how to ignore these suggeztions
[ July 30, 2004: Message edited by: R K Singh ]
 
mister krabs
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I have no idea why you would spell a word like "civilization" with an "s". Do you pronounce it as if it was an "s"? In the US, we pronounce the "z" in "civilization" the same way we pronounce the "z" in
"zany". Why don't you spell "zany" as "sany"? Or "zoo" as "soo"?
 
Bacon
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Local variations in languages are a fact of life. Of course, one always thinks they are right and everyone else wrong.

Even from my area to NYC there are differences:
In NYC you stand "on line" at home it's "in line"
In NYC you order a "hero" at home it's a "sub"
In NYC you drink "soda" at home it's "pop"

I don't know if they are technically dialects, but in the US alone there are many "flavors" of English, not to mention all the other countries that have it as a primary language. I'm sure Australian English and South African English are different than British English and each other. Even within those countries there are variations, no doubt.

I'm sure most Brits claim ownership, the cats out of the bag and there;s no getting it back in!
 
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Originally posted by Thomas Paul:
I have no idea why you would spell a word like "civilization" with an "s". Do you pronounce it as if it was an "s"? In the US, we pronounce the "z" in "civilization" the same way we pronounce the "z" in
"zany". Why don't you spell "zany" as "sany"? Or "zoo" as "soo"?



For the same reason that we don't spell sugar as shugar. And business as bizness

[ July 30, 2004: Message edited by: Sadanand Murthy ]
[ July 30, 2004: Message edited by: Sadanand Murthy ]
 
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In NYC you drink "soda" at home it's "pop"

Generic names for soft drinks by county
Via Akma
[ July 30, 2004: Message edited by: Mapraputa Is ]
 
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It's funny. Even though I'd write the word "Airplane"(American) I pronounce it "Aeroplane"(British)
[ July 31, 2004: Message edited by: Helen Thomas ]
 
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Joe King:

This is something that always amazes me. Are there really people out there who would not have bought something at �5 but would at �4.99?

Not only that, I remember once talking to someone about pricing of a product, and she at one point said, 'actually I think I'd be more likely to buy it at $7; $7 sounds cheaper than $5'. On questioning, she knew it was more expensive, but she really thought it 'sounded cheaper'.
 
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Just curious; How do you guys spell bouquet ?
 
Mapraputa Is
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Russian spelling: buket.
 
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In NYC you stand "on line" at home it's "in line"
..and outside of USA we "join a queue".....

How come JMS/MQSeries etc etc all use the word "queue" and we dont talk about "Message Lines", Since they were no doubt originaly developed in west coast USA?
 
Helen Thomas
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Originally posted by Adrian Wallace:
In NYC you stand "on line" at home it's "in line"
..and outside of USA we "join a queue".....

How come JMS/MQSeries etc etc all use the word "queue" and we dont talk about "Message Lines", Since they were no doubt originaly developed in west coast USA?



I suppose, (English usage instead of the American, I guess , since Line Theory and Queue Theory are two totally different subjects.
[ August 01, 2004: Message edited by: Helen Thomas ]
 
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Originally posted by Warren Dew:

Not only that, I remember once talking to someone about pricing of a product, and she at one point said, 'actually I think I'd be more likely to buy it at $7; $7 sounds cheaper than $5'. On questioning, she knew it was more expensive, but she really thought it 'sounded cheaper'.



I saw an article in the paper a while back that was about women's shopping habits. Apparently as they shop, the part of the brain that deals with logic slows down. As the shopping continues, the average woman becomes less logical. The scientists who did the study came up with the theory that it comes from our hunter-gather past - while primitive women were out gathering berries in the forest it was a good thing for the logic part of the brain to be less active, because too much logic may scare them away from the food as they consider the threats from animals. Their theory was that the fruit gathering women became less interested in the side effects of the gathering and just concentrated on getting as much as possible.

The scientists went on to see if men suffer from the same problem, and found an even stranger behaviour. In most cases men do not have the same problem, except for in gadget/car shops. The scientists didn't seem to have any idea how this tied in with primitive hunter-gather man though.
[ August 02, 2004: Message edited by: Joe King ]
 
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Originally posted by Helen Thomas:
It's funny. Even though I'd write the word "Airplane"(American) I pronounce it "Aeroplane"(British)



Not to mention the shorthand: plane
Or the more technical: aircraft
 
Bacon
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Originally posted by Mapraputa Is:
Generic names for soft drinks by county



The amazing part is that someone took the time to compile all that information!?
 
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Originally posted by Adrian Wallace:

3) "Leverage" (a personal favourite of mine) - This NOT a verb!!!



Any word can be verbed.
 
Mapraputa Is
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And any thread herbed...

Herb, I had to delete your post as well as subsequent post which consisted of your quoting your own previous post as the question whether Bill Clinton's had "sex" with Monica was already attempted to be brought up in this very thread. No need to waste efforts...
 
Jeroen Wenting
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Originally posted by Ray Marsh:


The amazing part is that someone took the time to compile all that information!?



I've never heard softdrinks in general referred to by the name "other" except in "beer, wine or other"

P.S. just to get this thread back the the MD level
 
Jeroen Wenting
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[ August 03, 2004: Message edited by: Max Habibi ]
 
Bacon
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That all depends on what your definition of "is" is!
 
Sadanand Murthy
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It bugs me no end whenever I hear people using past tense where past participle is called for. Many of the people I work with do this. I wonder if this is mainly an American thing or if it is prevalent in the UK & other english speaking countries.

Example:
I've went ...
I'd ran...

And of course, adverbs, for the most part, have, it appears to me, been removed from the parts of speech. We don't have to drive safely or carefully anymore; just safe or careful. Nothing is really bad or good; they are real bad or good. I don't feel poorly anymore; I feel poor (guess that is true even when I feel poorly).
[ August 03, 2004: Message edited by: Sadanand Murthy ]
 
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