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Misnomers

 
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Ray how about, how about some nice Jellied Eel. Delicious!
The Giant British Cookbook!
 
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Originally posted by Joe King:
Actually its not that bad - "fag" is cigarette, "faggots" are a kind of meat-ball, "spotted dick" is a kind of sponge with raisons in it (not actually a brand name like the link suggests) and buns are bread rolls.



So, are you buying?
 
Ray Marsh
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Originally posted by Peter Rooke:
Ray how about, how about some nice Jellied Eel. Delicious!
The Giant British Cookbook!



Eel...hmmmm. Does it taste like chicken?

Some folks here in the states like Rocky Mountian Oysters. In case you are wondering... no, they are not actually oysters. yuk!
 
Peter Rooke
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Eel...hmmmm. Does it taste like chicken?



No idea, you don't think I would eat this do you! Maybe a Londoner may be able to tell you.
 
Ray Marsh
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Eel.... I might try it. Its just a fish, after all, right? I don't know about jellied, though.

I do not partake in the afore mentioned rocky mountian oysters, however. That's one area of the anatomy that I try to avoid.
 
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Tight has several meanings.

The unusual ones are :


He wouldn't mind because we are tight. (mates)

After a few glasses he was tight. (high as a kite or just plain drunk)

and, tight as in tight-fisted.


Tight as in drunk is a misnomer ; Drunks are never quiet and sullen.
[ December 02, 2004: Message edited by: Helen Thomas ]
 
Peter Rooke
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Here's a few more misnomers: Council 'Worker', Civil 'Service'!
And of course '[Govenment] Budget'.

I think I'm getting too cynical. :roll:
 
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Don't forget 'military intelligence'.
 
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Originally posted by Peter Rooke:
Ray how about, how about some nice Jellied Eel. Delicious!
The Giant British Cookbook!



I see this link is to greatbritishkitch.co.uk. Wouldn't "great British kitchen" be a misnomer?
[ December 02, 2004: Message edited by: Jason Menard ]
 
Peter Rooke
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Yes,

Don't forget 'military intelligence'.

- I think MI5 and MI6 are too, but best not to get into that!

"Great British kitchen"

- Yes I think so, lots of good British food here; but still the french have the best reputation.

Have a look here for some generated
Web Economy Bullshit
.
 
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Originally posted by Jason Menard:

Wouldn't "great British kitchen" be a misnomer?



Why is it that the world mocks British cooking? What's so bad about it?

British food is very good - my favourite meal would be a roast with all the trimmings, followed by an apple pie, food British in origin. Not only do we have our own good food, but there is a huge foreign influence over food in Britain, with a large variety of food eaten. Far from being poor quality, Britain probably has one of the most variable diets in Europe.

Its unfortunate, however, that there are a growing number of people who do not take advantage of that fact. Its a sad site when I go to the supermarket and people ignoring all this good food to pile their trolleys full of pre-packed rubbish. There does seem to be a tendency for overweight people to pick the pre-packaged meals (not that me looking around while shopping is that scientific a study).... I don't get why so many people don't want to cook properly - its cheaper, healthier and tastes better. Maybe they think they don't have time
 
Jason Menard
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Originally posted by Joe King:
Why is it that the world mocks British cooking? What's so bad about it?



I don't think it's fair to say that the whole world mocks British cuisine. It's probably only those who have eaten it that mock it.

Mildly amusing anecdote about British military cuisine. During my stint in England I had a couple of opportunities to participate in field exercises with the British army. What I remember vividly from one of these exercises was the British field kitchen. I was amazed to see them bring out a whole side of beef (I think) and do the butchering right there in the great outdoors. I was unfortunately somewhat underwhelmed when eating the final product. The best thing you can say for it was that it was hot. It was some kind of stew, but there were unidentified things in the stew which I'm fairly certain most non-British Westerners would have avoided eating at all costs. It was pretty heinous, but in those conditions you certainly can't turn down a hot meal. Breakfast the next morning was eggs and baked beans. Certainly not your average American offering, but all-in-all not too bad (and most importantly, it was hot).

It was also during this time that the British affinity for tea really was highlighted for me. It didn't matter where we were, what the conditions were, or anything like that, the Brits would always have tea on. It was frigid as all get out, but after pulling your stint at sentry duty in the wee hours, it was certainly great to be able to come in out of the cold after a couple hours walking a post to get a nice cup of hot tea before crawling into your sleeping bag. Definitely had to thank them for that one.

My favorite British food had to be the fish-and-chips. Man those fries are greasy, but they sure are good. Not British food to be sure, but I was also a fan of the kabob shops, who had the same greasy chips. There was nothing better after a pub crawl than hitting up the kabob shop just before closing.

The worst food I had over there though was a sorry attempt at a Mexican restaurant in Ipswitch. It started off with the appetizer. There were probably four or five of us, and we decided we would split some chips and guacamole. What we got, much to our dismay, was a tiny cup of guac placed on a saucer, and in a nice neat circle arranged around the cup of guac were ten small tortilla chips. Certainly not what we were expecting. Not to mention, the guacamole was sooo vinegary. Then the main entries came out. I think I ordered enchilladas. They were also strangely vinegary. More amusing however was the sides served with the dish. Typical sides served with Mexican food are beans (usually refried) and rice. Not in Ipswitch however, where the sides of choice for Mexican food were bean sprouts, and red cabbage. :roll: Hell, I got better Mexican food in Japan than England, although the Chi-Chi's in London was tolerable.
 
Peter Rooke
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I've heard stories about the US military food - of course its a lot better than the British (Army) food. That of course is not hard, since the Army spend as little as possible on it (same as the personal kit!). I always preferred ration packs, much better than anything the army cooks would dish out. Yuk army food...

Anyway I've heard that on US Navy ships, they serve large meals - typically each person gets asked 'six or a dozen' for each item, and end up with six sausages, six slices of bacon, six eggs - and that�s only breakfast! Also, I have heard the big US ships have some burger chains on them!
 
Helen Thomas
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British cuisine - Yum.

Sausages with champ mash and shallot jus , Gower scallops with black pudding and rouille washed down with a Real ale. Slow cooked lamb shank or Teesdale lamb with garlic mash , salad of Swaledale cheese and Lyonnaise potatoes ; crab bisque and langoustines fresh from the Scottish coast, Brixham fish and air-dried ham with some of the best local beers.

Unfortunately , for this kind of fare you'd have to search the width and length of the country. That's what makes it special. Described is real pub food not the pie and mash or pie and chips that you'd find in the average local pub.
 
Joe King
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Originally posted by Peter Rooke:
Anyway I've heard that on US Navy ships, they serve large meals - typically each person gets asked 'six or a dozen' for each item, and end up with six sausages, six slices of bacon, six eggs - and that�s only breakfast! Also, I have heard the big US ships have some burger chains on them!



No wonder the US Navy's ships are so large. The enemy don't need to bother shelling them, they should just send in some more burgers and so "go-large" special promotion vouchers. Soon the sailors will get so fat the ships will sink.

I thought the general point of the armed services was that they were made up of tough people to go and do nasty things for us, not to be made up of floating Burger Admiral chain. Everyone knows the Scots are the toughest fighters in the world, so the navy should be on a Scottish diet of haggis, muesli and whiskey. If that doesn't make them keen to finish the war and get home quickly, nothing will.
 
Helen Thomas
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Swiss Army has to be another misnomer.

In the 100 years or so that they have been in existence they have never been to war even once. The only useful thing to have come out of it is the Swiss Army pen-knife.
 
Peter Rooke
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You would agree that our military, need to be relatively fit and healthy. It then follows that they should be offered a reasonably healthy diet. It's my opinion that they should at least have this choice. It was my experience that the food was cheap, typically fried. I used to buy my own healthy food some of the time .

Yes, a lot of the military is drawn from Scotland, but also Northern England, Wales, Northern Ireland, and Nepal. Maybe this because we do not have the employment opportunities like in southern England.

I think also the Swiss army used to be an elite force, many years ago. I think they once guarded the Pope in Rome, in medieval times.
 
Joe King
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Originally posted by Helen Thomas:
Swiss Army has to be another misnomer.

In the 100 years or so that they have been in existence they have never been to war even once. The only useful thing to have come out of it is the Swiss Army pen-knife.



Perhaps its because they have an army (and a rather good set of easily defendable mountains) that they have not been in a war. While they don't have a standing army, they have approx 1.8m potential soldiers that can be called up into the a militia because of the mandatory national service and training that most men have to do there: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Military_of_Switzerland

Originally posted by Peter Rooke:
I think they once guarded the Pope in Rome, in medieval times.



They still do: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swiss_guard
 
Helen Thomas
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All Swiss men aged 18 are required to enlist in the Army or face prison. They are trained for war until they are 30 but expect the chances of that happening to be nil. I think it should be a standard.

I expect they don't have defence aircraft and missiles ...
 
Joe King
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I'm sure I read somewhere that the Swiss have the largest navy of any landlocked country (in the lakes and rivers).
 
Peter Rooke
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BST, British Summer (Time).
[ December 07, 2004: Message edited by: Peter Rooke ]
 
Did Steve tell you that? Fuh - Steve. Just look at this tiny ad:
SKIP - a book about connecting industrious people with elderly land owners
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