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Determine the significance of these

 
Marshal
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Originally posted by marc weber:

I have the first movie on DVD, but I haven't watched it yet. I kind of previewed it, switching between subtitles and the English dub, and found these are very different translations. So for the original movie, do you recommend subtitles or dub?



That's not unusual for foreign films, and especially anime. Usually, the semantics of the dialog are pretty well preserved, but the actual words can differ, sometimes dramatically. (Actual example that made me LOL: spoken dialog: "Fuck!", subtitle: "Oh, darn!")

My recommendation would be to watch the movie with the dubbed English, and if you enjoy it, again with the subtitles to see if there's anything extra you can get from that. For me, it'd be harder to pay attention to what's going on while trying to read the subtitles first time through.


(Malice@Doll looks cool. Any thoughts on that one?)



Not familiar with that one, though the premise is rather, er, interesting.
 
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[Bear]: The second "movie" is a bit difficult to watch as there is no English-language dub. You either need to rely upon the English subtitles, or your Japanese skills (which, except for what I picked up by watching Shogun, do not exist for me). But the animation is incredible.

No problem - subtitles are usually my my preferred choice for foreign films anyway. With anime I'm more flexible, as I figure ultimately it's an overdub either way. With Cowboy Bebop it's been overdub all the way. And now I have a thing for Wendee Lee.

[marc]: So for the original movie, do you recommend subtitles or dub?

I can't answer your question for this specific movie, but sometimes I start by having English overdub and English subtitles simultaneously. Within a few minutes I can tell if I like one translation better than the other. Then I use that preferred version for the rest of the film.
 
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Originally posted by Bear Bibeault:
...Actual example that made me LOL: spoken dialog: "Fuck!", subtitle: "Oh, darn!"...


Check this one, 1 min 45 sec into Ghost in the Shell...

English dub: "Must be a loose wire."
Subtitle: "It's that time of the month."
 
Bear Bibeault
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OK, so much for "semantically accurate"!

Which made more sense in the context of the scene? (It's been years...)
[ June 12, 2006: Message edited by: Bear Bibeault ]
 
marc weber
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Originally posted by Bear Bibeault:
... Which made more sense in the context of the scene? (It's been years...)


I think either one could work in the context of the scene. And since I've only seen a little of the beginning, I can't say which is more in character. But if patterns like that continue through the film, the different translations could give the film a very different tone. Obviously, I'll need to watch it both ways now!

(Note: The DVD I have is an older copy, before they re-released it as a 2-disc special edition. I don't know if that made any difference in the subtitles.)
[ June 12, 2006: Message edited by: marc weber ]
 
marc weber
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Hmmm... I just found this...

What breed of spineless whelps decided to change the Major's comment at the beginning from "It's that time of the month." (which also appears in the comic) to "Must be a loose wire."? Sheesh. Aside from that, however, the dubbed version is pretty tolerable.


And (more interestingly) this...

Kusanagi still believes she is human, however, attributing technical errors to organic causes. When her lieutenant Batou comments on the radio, "There's a lot of static in your brain," her response is clich´┐Ż: "It's that time of the month." Oddly, the English dub ... gets this all backwards, translating Kusanagi's response as, "It must be a loose wire." Whose fault is the malfunction: the organic body, or the technical one?

 
Jim Yingst
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Assorted context and other clues to help with the remaining references:

16309: "Assuming he hasn't changed the combination. He's quite intelligent..."

1-7-3-4-6-7-3-2-1-4-7-6-Charlie-3-2-7-8-9-7-7-7-6-4-3-Tango-7-3-2-Victor-7-3-1-1-7-8-8-8-7-3-2-4-7-6-7-8-9-7-6-4-3-7-6-Lock: apparently sometime in the next eighty or so years, they upgraded standard security for root access. Good idea.

CSM-101: Think Apollo, not Starbuck

Sigma 957: "Whatever they are [...], they walk near Sigma 957. And they must walk there... alone"

2187: People who got 1138 and TK421 should have a good chance at this one too

9906753: "TOP SECRET ARMY INTEL 9906753 DO NOT OPEN"

271828: the slide ruler generation would've known this one immediately, I think

27B/6: "Have you got a twenty-seven B stroke six?"
 
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Originally posted by Jim Yingst:
2187: People who got 1138 and TK421 should have a good chance at this one too

When I saw "2187" the first thing that went through my mind was "That's a power of 3". The seventh power, to be exact, although it took me a couple of seconds to get that part.
 
Jim Yingst
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Cool. Not what I had in mind, but good catch. But 271828 doesn't look familiar to you?
[ June 16, 2006: Message edited by: Jim Yingst ]
 
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i'm trying NOT to just google these...


27B stroke 6 SOUNDS so dang familiar... it's some kind of form, like in an office. Brazil?

so does the "assuming he hasn't chagned the combination...". is it from I, Robot? some kind of robot... i think...

CSM-101... Apollo moon missions?

271828 are the first few digits of e, but i'm not sure what the literary/cultural relevance is...
 
marc weber
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Originally posted by fred rosenberger:
...27B stroke 6 SOUNDS so dang familiar... it's some kind of form, like in an office. Brazil? ...


That's it.
 
Bear Bibeault
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16309, access code to the Reliant's bridge controls. Used by Kirk to force Reliant to drop shields after it had been commandeered by Khan Noonien Singh.
 
Paul Clapham
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Originally posted by Jim Yingst:
But 271828 doesn't look familiar to you?

Well, yeah, the first few decimal digits of e...
 
Jim Yingst
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[fred]: CSM-101... Apollo moon missions?

Yes. The Command Service Module on Apollo 7, the first manned Apollo flight.

[fred]: 271828 are the first few digits of e, but i'm not sure what the literary/cultural relevance is...

Culture, schmulture! You originally asked for the "geek context", with questions that were all from science fiction, except one real-world spaceship. With my questions I expanded the scope a little bit, and said that I'd included two real-world math constants (as well as other non-science fiction things). 141549265 was recognized quickly, enough even without the leading 3. I figured e was fair game here.

[Bear]: 16309, access code to the Reliant's bridge controls. Used by Kirk to force Reliant to drop shields after it had been commandeered by Khan Noonien Singh.

Yep!
[ June 16, 2006: Message edited by: Jim Yingst ]
 
Jim Yingst
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[fred]: Originally posted by fred rosenberger:
...27B stroke 6 SOUNDS so dang familiar... it's some kind of form, like in an office. Brazil? ...


Yep. Quoth Harry Tuttle, heating engineer: "Paperwork - couldn't stand the paperwork. Listen, this whole system could be on fire, and I couldn't even turn on a kitchen tap without filling out a 27B/6." Later Sam Lowry makes use of this info to fend off unwanted interference from Central Services: "Have you got a 27B/6?", provoking a very frustrated reaction and a threatening "We'll be back!". When they return, they make sure to have Lowry sign the appropriate form as they proceed to pretty much destroy his apartment.
 
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Yet more context for the remaining items (because I know you're all sitting on pins and needles, waiting to find out...)

----

1-7-3-4-6-7-3-2-1-4-7-6-Charlie-3-2-7-8-9-7-7-7-6-4-3-Tango-7-3-2-Victor-7-3-1-1-7-8-8-8-7-3-2-4-7-6-7-8-9-7-6-4-3-7-6-Lock:

The speaker is Data, but the voice is Picard's.

----

Sigma 957:

"Sigma 957 is not a healthy place. Strange things happen there."

"Negative emergency power. Orbit deteriorating. Estimate impact with Sigma 957 in two hours."

SI: "Zog!" "Zog what?" "Zog yes?" "Zog no?"
MC: "My guess is that Zog means No."
SI: "Like hell, I am not leaving here without a Yes."

----

2187: "Here it is: 2187. You go and get her. I'll hold them here."

----

9906753: "Fools... bureaucratic fools. They don't know what they've got there."
[ June 23, 2006: Message edited by: Jim Yingst ]
 
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Originally posted by Jim Yingst:
Yet more context for the remaining items (because I know you're all sitting on pins and needles, waiting to find out...)

----

1-7-3-4-6-7-3-2-1-4-7-6-Charlie-3-2-7-8-9-7-7-7-6-4-3-Tango-7-3-2-Victor-7-3-1-1-7-8-8-8-7-3-2-4-7-6-7-8-9-7-6-4-3-7-6-Lock:

The speaker is Data, but the voice is Picard's.

----

Sigma 957:

"Sigma 957 is not a healthy place. Strange things happen there."

"Negative emergency power. Orbit deteriorating. Estimate impact with Sigma 957 in two hours."

SI: "Zog!" "Zog what?" "Zog yes?" "Zog no?"
MC: "My guess is that Zog means No."
SI: "Like hell, I am not leaving here without a Yes."

----

2187: "Here it is: 2187. You go and get her. I'll hold them here."


This line is from Star Wars episode IV. The scene where Han and Luke break into the detention center to rescue Princess Leia. 2187 was the Leia's cell number


----

9906753: "Fools... bureaucratic fools. They don't know what they've got there."



This line is from Raiders of the Lost Arc. The scene is toward the very end of the movie after Indy is denied the opportunity to study the Arc but was assured the Army had their "Top Men" investigating it. The last scene of the movie shows the Arc being crated up and stored in a huge government warehouse. the number on the crate was 9906753.

Thanks for the additional clues Jim!
[ June 28, 2006: Message edited by: Jim Yingst ]
 
Jim Yingst
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Good job, Bob. I figured the 9906753 itself was unlikely to be remembered by many, but with a few more clues...

Unfortunately for the remaining two, I don't think there's much more I can give for clues without giving them away. The problem is that both come from TV episodes, probably seen by far fewer people than Star Wars, Raiders, 2001, etc. And for people who didn't see the episodes in question, there's really no chance fo guessing.

On the other hand, I know there are fans of both these series wandering around here...
 
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