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what is your favorite type of pie?  RSS feed

 
Marshal
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Bear Bibeault wrote: . . . Not a variety I've ever seen on this side of the pond.

You'll hve to come and visit and try them for yourself. Apples not available in Spring or Summer.
 
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I was super excited to eat apple pie when I saw it for the first time. Had a bite and it was miles ahead of my sweet limits.
And that was the last bite of apple pie I ever had. Blueberry pie is another I tried and I liked both.
Honestly I think both very heavy sugary to me, only a tad of fruit flavor.
 
Campbell Ritchie
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Depends on who cooks the pie. You should just add enough sugar to make it slightly sweet, so the apple comes through. And a proper cooking apple, like a Bramley.

Beware if you are growing apples: most trees are not self‑fertile, so you may need to plant several trees of different varieties before you get any fruit.
 
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Campbell Ritchie wrote:Depends on who cooks the pie.


Most certainly. A commercial apple pie will almost invariably be very very sweet.

My own tends to be less sweet as I prefer tart over sweet. We use Granny Smith apples, which are the tart apples most available here in the States.
 
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Bear Bibeault wrote:I use lots of limes (Persian), I'd love to have a tree. I have loquats growing in my backyard as the Austin weather is perfect for them.

Tim, how cold do your winters get? I'm wondering if a (Persian) lime tree would grow in Austin. We get occasional freezes during the winters. How big do the Persian lime trees get?



I'm beginning to get worried about the "notify when reply is posted" mechanism. It doesn't seem to work for me anymore. I just happened to wander by or I would have never seen this question.

In answer to your question, officially the temperature here should be expected, on average, to drop below freezing about 30 days each year. That's as measured at the airport, which is at the Northern side of the county and inland. I used to have a lime tree when I lived on the inland side of the river and it would typically come ripe about December 24 just in time to get nuked and freeze back to about 3 feet high, growing back to about 5 feet before getting zapped again the next year. Then we got a REALLY nasty freeze - so cold the WEEDS died and it was goodby tree.

I planted the tree I have now shortly after moving to the seawards-side of the river, which is about 2 miles wide, flows from the South, and has other moderating factors. Plus for the last decade or so, we've only had 10 freeze days per season instead of 30. It has gotten cold enough to seriously damage the key lime, but the Persian lime has never had anything but some damage to the ends of the branches. In addition to warmer winters, the tree is up fairly close to the house and apparently the really cold winds come from the other direction.

In earlier years I'd box it in during the coldest days using plywood sheets (window protection for Hurricane season), blankets and a plastic tarp, but I haven't bothered lately. It's now about 12 feet tall, so it's no longer as easy to wrap up. It's also about the same distance around, and I had to watch a lot of limes drop and rot because I didn't want to get skewered by the thorns trying to reach for the inside fruit. We plan to get one of those basket-on-a-pole things that commercial harvesters use.

The Key lime tree is a different story. It's on what's supposed to be the "best" side of the house. Facing South-East, also close to the walls, but the cold has done serious damage to the bark. It also grew up about 15 feet tall. I didn't expect that. On the Keys, we got limes off bushes!

If they grow oranges commercially around Austin, you might want to take a chance. Grapefruit isn't good enough - they're more cold-tolerant. Meyer lemons are apparently pretty hardy - although I personally have never had to test that until this year - got a new tree last spring.

You're likely feeling the "Canadian Express" right now. It's due here overnight and the temperatures it's bringing are what we normally see around December 31st. So I'll be bundling up stuff shortly. I have tomato plants and pineapples that should have died long ago, and the tomatoes are just now about to get ripe!

BTW, loquats and calamondins are very cold-hardy and I believe that they were featuring something like a "lime loquat" at the local citrus nursery when I got my lemon tree. Supposed to not only be cold hardy but small enough to grow indoors.
 
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Last vote in cow poll was on January 10, 2019
 
Don't get me started about those stupid light bulbs.
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