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Thomas Westley
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I have just received the (very short) brief for my final year project and was wondering whether you guys could help me at all. The brief is:

Build a web-based use-case development tool.

Can anyone give me any clues as to the technologies that I should be researching for use in this project? The reason that I post this question here is that using an applet was the first thing that sprang to mind but I consider Java my strongest point so I may be overlooking some way better/easier to implement things.

Thanks in adveance to any help offered.
Thomas
 
Stuart Gray
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Off the top of my head, perhaps JSP and XML will be useful. A knowledge of HTML could be handy as well.

Then again, presumably you are supposed to implement the project using (mostly) technologies that you are already quite familar with. What kind of topics have you covered? What is the time frame for this project?
 
Thomas Westley
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Cheers for the help, I thought XML might be useful, don't really know much about it at the moment though. Will have to get reading I suppose.
Then again, presumably you are supposed to implement the project using (mostly) technologies that you are already quite familar with.

No, not really, I don't think. Part of the point of the project is researching what might be best and learning new languages etc.
I have about 9 months to do it in, so I can expand the project as much as I like and get as much done as possible in that time frame.
-Thomas-

[ September 22, 2005: Message edited by: Thomas Westley ]
[ September 22, 2005: Message edited by: Thomas Westley ]
 
Ulf Dittmer
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You've got to be kidding. Or rather, your professor has got to be kidding. It's brief (as in short) all right. But it doesn't tell you what you're supposed to do. That sentence can be interpreted in many, quite different, ways.
If it's supposed to be web-based, then HTML and JS and servlets/JSP etc. will come in handy, for sure, but what good does the implementation technology do if the task at hand is so ridiculously under-defined?
(Mumbling and shaking my head in amazement...)
 
Kenneth Albertson
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Originally posted by Thomas Westley:
The brief is: Build a web-based use-case development tool.


A lot of commercial projects start with briefs not unlike this. Step 1 (and 2, and 3 ....) should always be to go back to your client / sponsor / professor and ask for some more details. If they refuse to provide them, ask "would it be acceptable if I did ...".

Even if they assert that they want to leave it up to you, life is never that simple. Your own success depends on making sure that you have identified the boundaries that you can't go beyond, and also that you understand what they really want, even if they don't want to tell you. You need to know how they are going to assess what you do for them.

In this case, make sure you know what the markers will be looking for when they mark your project.

Your goals and success criteria might be different, so they are important too. If you want to take the opportunity to learn a new technology, here is a chance to spend some time on it. But if you want to impress with a great product, perhaps go with the tools you know.

Whatever you do, you should provide a justification for your technology choice. That means identifying requirements and constraints, and comparing the strengths and weaknesses of possible alternatives. And as long as the technology you choose is up to the task, it doesn't necessarily need to be the absolute best. If you have tools at hand that will do the job, that is a perfectly valid selection criteria.

Of course, if you want to stay in this forum, you have to chooce Java.
 
Keith Pitty
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I guess it depends what the aim of the exercise is.

You could use servlets, JSPs and JavaBeans to build a web app. You could consider using one of the many Java web frameworks available (e.g. Struts or JSF). Or, you could use another technology like PHP or Ruby on Rails.

But perhaps a wiki would be good enough?

If I were you I would be seeking clarification from your lecturer.
 
Thomas Westley
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If I were you I would be seeking clarification from your lecturer.

Yes, I will be doing this, but I think I should have at least some idea of what I maybe should/could be using before I go and see him.

Thank you everyone for your words of advice.
Thomas.
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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