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Cool "sayings" from other countries

 
Gregg Bolinger
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When is it ok to start using cool little phrases that are typically heard in other countries? For example, 2 of my favorite little "sayings" are
"Spot on!"
and
"Good on ya!"
Spot on being more of a UK phrase, I think. And Good on ya I have heard time and again from Austrailians. I say them every now and then around people I know and they just look at me funny. They'll get used to it eventually. The hardest thing is to say them with an American accent and not how I've heard them from other people.
 
Steven Broadbent
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guess it dosen't matter - depends on how well you want to be understood.
I came to Oxford from the north of England about 14 years ago. I decided that I wouldn't use the local slang but would keep my "native" vocab.
So there is a large range of london/SE lingo that I do not ever use.
 
Richard Hawkes
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Originally posted by Gregg Bolinger:
... Good on ya I have heard time and again from Austrailians.
The Kiwis I know shorten this to 'On ya' or 'Onyaa!'
 
John Dunn
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When my Irish buddies hang with my American bros there's always some good laughs at the "new" phrases.
My favorite: "On the piss" : Describes 'out drinking'.
So maybe an Irish Buddy would say to one of the Americans:
Dunn and I were on the piss last night and ...
 
Steve Wink
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Originally posted by John Dunn:
When my Irish buddies hang with my American bros there's always some good laughs at the "new" phrases.
My favorite: "On the piss" : Describes 'out drinking'.
So maybe an Irish Buddy would say to one of the Americans:
Dunn and I were on the piss last night and ...

And was the Craic ( pronounced crack ) good?
 
John Dunn
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I don't do crack when I'm out with my bros, (Wink, Wink)
 
Marcus Green
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He's as much use as a one legged man at an arse kicking contest (Australian)
 
Steven Broadbent
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pissed and chemist are very useful adjectives as well for confusing non-native english speakers.
 
Marc Peabody
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"Catching a perv" - to check out (look at) a good-looking person

It's an Australian phrase that might be used in other countries as well.
 
Gregg Bolinger
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Originally posted by Marc Peabody:
"Catching a perv" - to check out (look at) a good-looking person

It's an Australian phrase that might be used in other countries as well.


I've heard that one in the U.S. quite a bit.
 
Steven Broadbent
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that is used in uk too. It means an over enthusiastic look - a step up from a discreet ogle. It's also a verb - to perve.
 
Foxxy Cleopatra
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Crikey, don't u blokes know how to spell Australia? What do think this is, bloody bushweek? Na just jokin!
 
Bert Bates
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Don't go agro until we sus it out.

(Australian: Don't flip out until we figure it out)
 
Stan James
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How about "Bless her cotton socks" in UK. Is that reserved for the Queen. She was the subject when I saw it in print.
 
Max Habibi
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Dancer

meaning cool, I think, in modern Scottish slag.
 
Helen Thomas
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Always wondered about the origin of this one:


You dancin' ?
You askin' ?
I'm dancin'.
You askin' , I'm dancin'.

I think it's classic Humphrey Boghart. First heard it in the late 80's.

See no googlin'. I'm askin'.
[ June 10, 2004: Message edited by: Helen Thomas ]
 
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