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Free Music and the Dark side of The Big Mac

 
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McDonald's to Give Away Music Downloads With Big Macs (Update2)

A bit of Cool on the side. Perhaps fries were the previous cool.

Sales of downloaded music are up by 3/4s of music on bought CDs and are expected to catch up by 2005.So the music business won't be complaining to protect their customers.

The Medics won't either apart from a few token protests about the state of the nation's health but cannot define what that state should be. In a trial children who were put on the diet they had in the War showed spurts of growth and alertness. (Well they weren't allowed to play on their computers but had to play outdoor games after school and walk to and fro school).
 
Helen Thomas
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Pepsi's iTunes promotion goes flat



Customers who wanted the codes did find a way of boosting their odds, which were supposed to be 1-in-3 for getting a free song. Fans discovered that by tilting the bottle at a certain angle, they could tell whether the bottle was a winner.



Low-tech 'hack' takes fizz out of Pepsi-iTunes promo


It doesn't take a code breaker or a math whiz to lift songs from Apple Computer's iTunes online music store--it just takes a good pair of eyes and a trip to the corner store.


[ June 07, 2004: Message edited by: Helen Thomas ]
 
Helen Thomas
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This would really be sad if it came to pass - the demise of music stations to be replaced by talk shows.

Radio Silence : How NPR purged classical music from its airwaves.

"There's no question that there's less and less classical music on the radio now, and more and more programming that's produced somewhere else. The trend seems kind of overwhelming at times, like something you can't overcome.

"But do I think classical music will disappear from public radio altogether?


And yet--so what? A reader with small-government, libertarian-conservative sympathies will raise the inevitable question: Why should government-supported radio exist at all? For those who look to public radio for classical music (or for any of the other traditional, minority tastes that are being purged from its airwaves), the principled small-government man will ask, Scrooge-like: Are there no CDs? Is there not satellite radio? Aren't there many other private means by which such eccentrics may satisfy their craving?



Somehow I doubt MacDonalds will be giving free downloads of classical music.
[ June 07, 2004: Message edited by: Helen Thomas ]
 
Helen Thomas
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A series of events shook the mission of NPR, and ultimately led to its remaking. The most influential of these was the election of Ronald Reagan in 1980. Indeed, it is a delightful irony--one that would appall Reaganites no less than the sophisticated LABs who run NPR--that the new, transformed public radio is itself a product of Reaganism.

And what do you know? In a happy coincidence, again thanks to Reaganism, these new ways of making money no longer seemed so vulgar--or, for that matter, illegal. Public broadcasting had always operated under severe constraints intended to keep it unsullied by commercialism. Under Reagan, however, the FCC got itself into a deregulating mood. It relaxed the "underwriting" rules that had prohibited public radio from carrying advertising. Under the new regulations, advertisers could be called "underwriters," and underwriters could give a station money in return for brief promotional spots that were not, under any circumstances, to be called advertising. Programmers meanwhile stepped up their solicitation of funds from corporations and foundations, and they began studying ways to produce programs that would draw in more of a better class of listener--the kind who could be relied upon to donate money to public radio, and who would, just as important, create a desirable target audience for underwriters.

Perhaps the whole Food Health Scam could learn a thing or two from Radio instead of appealing to folks Dark side all the time.

And Reagan crops up again. Was Reagan the Accidental Hero of all time ?
 
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I've never seen classical music as the linchpin of quality radio. The lack of it, however, seems a decent measure of two things, in whatever proportion they might exist:

a) lack of interested listeners
b) lack of sufficient income to sustain it

We're just as far away from William Bennett's view of cultural literacy as we ever were. Maybe it's not a problem rooted in liberalism after all.
[ June 07, 2004: Message edited by: Michael Ernest ]
 
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I agree that the broadcast radio scene is bland and useless today, with the highly formatted Clear Channel dominating. Their decision to drop Stern is only slightly less disturbing as the government's decision to force the issue. Clear Channel cowed to the threat of force, and that's a far worse sin than broadcasting pablum.

I've learned to depend on other sources than broadcast radio for non-mainstream quality music for some time now. As a non-mainstream college DJ at WMUC (College Park, Maryland) twenty years ago, we all learned to despise the evil empire NPR. Their actions were the "invasion of the body snatchers" of the time. My good friend at WJHU (Johns Hopkins) was displaced as NPR came in.

NPR was good at eliminating many of the very few sources of good local and other non-mainstream music, and replacing it with far less relevant national shows. They eliminated jobs, paid and unpaid. They took away the joy of being a volunteer DJ for many young people.

I find it interesting that people who are pro-government control of the arts become upset when their desires no longer coincide with the elites in power. As far as I'm concerned, the government has only been a barrier to my ability to be exposed to culturally significant music.

NPR has some great shows. Most of them would not disappear were government funding for NPR to disappear. The viable ones (i.e. the ones people want to listen to) would find other venues. But I'm very disturbed that my tax money is spent on something that is so politically one-sided. Imagine, if you will, that the tide at NPR somehow changes to represent only politically conservative viewpoints. Do you want your tax money spent on that?

As far as classical music is concerned, you won't see McDonalds offering CDs or downloads of other non-popular music--tribal music, world beat, Argentinian tango, hardcore, German industrial, Elephant 6 collective music, Austrialian goth, or other things I like to listen to. You've also never had an opportunity to hear much of these on NPR.

I don't decry the lack of these at McDonalds, nor do I decry the lack of these at NPR (which, to be fair, will profile things like these on rare occasion, and some of the stations such as KRCC here do have freeform late at night). I don't demand that my government provide them for me. For a very low cost, I can listen to much of this on Sirius satellite. Sirius also broadcasts content that would otherwised be censored by your government.

Better yet, I can listen to just about anything on internet radio at virtually no cost. Except where "federal regulations" screw me over. (As an example, try customizing one of the AccuRadio channels by selecting more than five artists to ignore.)

-Jeff-
 
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I've been listening to commercial classical stations for more than two decades now. Classical music is good enough that it doesn't need government support to stay alive.
 
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I'm an XM listener these days and I enjoy the diversity it offers. Hopefully satellite radio will do for radio what cable did for television.
 
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Originally posted by Helen Thomas:
McDonald's to Give Away Music Downloads With Big Macs (Update2)

A bit of Cool on the side. Perhaps fries were the previous cool.

Sales of downloaded music are up by 3/4s of music on bought CDs and are expected to catch up by 2005.So the music business won't be complaining to protect their customers.

The Medics won't either apart from a few token protests about the state of the nation's health but cannot define what that state should be. In a trial children who were put on the diet they had in the War showed spurts of growth and alertness. (Well they weren't allowed to play on their computers but had to play outdoor games after school and walk to and fro school).



Now I know a lot of people might knock Mc Donalds. Heck some might attribute it to that "evil liberal agenda" thats floating about. Ask Jeroen. But Id like to offer a "fair and balanced" appraisal of McDonalds.

Sure. It might be microwaved cardboard youre eating. But I promise you, if your hungover, go into any McDonalds and ask for McBacon Sandwich and a Diet Coke.

Instant Hangover cure. Proven (on me at least... if anyone wants to fund some studies, I'll happily accept Paypal, Visa or Bankers Draft) to act fast. Try it, you wont regret it!

Mark
 
Michael Ernest
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And yet you don't see quite so many drunks at Mickey D's as you might then expect...
 
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And yet--so what? A reader with small-government, libertarian-conservative sympathies will raise the inevitable question: Why should government-supported radio exist at all? For those who look to public radio for classical music (or for any of the other traditional, minority tastes that are being purged from its airwaves), the principled small-government man will ask, Scrooge-like: Are there no CDs? Is there not satellite radio? Aren't there many other private means by which such eccentrics may satisfy their craving?



Government funded radio is an important part of the media spectrum, particularly if the radio station is monitored by some kind of independent regulator that can ensure that the station does not become a government spokesperson. Its important that companies and individuals cannot gain influence over radio stations and what they broadcast. An example of this is in Italy, where a large amount of the media is owned by Berlusconi. The media owned by him are unsurprisingly unwilling to criticise him, and its been a definite advantage to him, as Prime Minister, to have a collection of media sources who are not going to be to much against him. The media has a very strong influence on people's opinions, so its vitally important that the media is kept as impartial as possible. The presence of a state-funded (and hopefully therefore uncorrupted) station can act as a balance to other stations.

The other reason is for variety. Although alternative (to main stream chart music) radio stations are doing ok (there are many in the UK for example), in the long term they will surely struggle against the big money that the main-stream commerical stations can pull in. I don't really like the idea of a whole bunch of radio stations all playing Britney, NSync and JLo along with Fox News style news updates all day long. Viva variety....
 
Jeff Langr
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- There isn't much "variety" in what NPR offers. See my earlier post. NPR caters to a narrowly focused demographic.

- Media outlets here consist of broadcast radio, satellite radio, broadcast television, cable television, newspapers, the internet, magazines, and a few others. While a political voice can seem to dominate in any one of these (e.g. liberals in broadcast television, conservatives in broadcast radio), they can't possibly dominate all forms. There is no longer a need for government-funded radio to "enforce" diversity, particularly when they don't do a good job of it (and particularly when they are politically one-sided in doing so).
 
Helen Thomas
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What about blogs ? Isn't that a form of radio ?

:Blogads demographics

I hear Photoshop may be used to get young people to vote.
 
Helen Thomas
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Most Blogs Have live radio as well. While just listening to Bloomberg Radio
came across. Reagan a Radio Junkie.

Reagan's Widerness Years



His Own Hand

With Reagan, this distinction is crucial, for his ``communication skills'' are inextricable from the greatness his partisans claim for him. So where did this greatness come from -- his speechwriters, or from some inner resource of his own?

The best place to find the answer is in a book written indisputably by the man himself.

``Reagan in His Own Hand,'' published in 2001, is a collection of radio commentaries written during what Reagan sentimentalists call, rather grandly, the Wilderness Years. Having lost the 1976 Republican presidential nomination to incumbent Gerald Ford, Reagan bided his time till the next presidential election by putting out a newspaper column and syndicating a series of daily radio talks.

A ghostwriter wrote the column. Still a radio announcer at heart, Reagan took pleasure in writing the three-minute broadcast scripts himself, by hand -- nearly 750 of them, reproduced in the book with all his emendations, crossovers and peculiar abbreviations.

A Matter of Ear

Reagan had a writer's ear. In one script he recalls composing a letter for a time capsule while driving up the California coast. He wonders about the generation who will read the letter 100 years on: ``Either they will be surrounded by the same beauty I knew as I wrote the letter or they will wonder sadly what it was like before that awful day when civilization broke down.''

Not bad. But then he rewrites: ``Either they will be surrounded by the same beauty we know or they will wonder what it was like when the world was still beautiful.''

From the first draft to the second, there is a loss of eight needless words and a maximum gain in power; the sentence grows from a private reflection to a universal warning.



Reagan's Greatness Is Put in Words: Andrew Ferguson (Correct)
[ June 09, 2004: Message edited by: Helen Thomas ]
 
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