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Which files have the extension .jspa

 
Amit Ghorpade
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Hi,
recently I noticed that most of the Sun site pages have the extension .jspa, some even have .xml.
So just curious about it because I don't know about jspa but as far as I know of xml, it is not rendered by browser like the way we see on Sun site.


Thanks for the help
 
Vassili Vladimir
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This is a logical name.

As a matter of fact, you can have any name for the extension as a java web deeveloper.

Struts framework as an example use the the extension .do

You may develop a Servlet or a JSP and give it the extension of .amit

So it's up to the application developer.

Regards,
 
Amit Ghorpade
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Hi, thanks for the reply, and yes I know of .do and I can understand of .amit also, but what about .xml. XML is a standard, and browsers parse xml documents and display them as hierarchy of object value pairs.
Isn't it.



Thanks in advance
 
fred rosenberger
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I am not an expert on such things, but i think at least with xml, the document itself contains a tag that says "HEY!!! I'M XML!!!". the parser uses the content of the file, not the name, to determine the XMLness of the file. the first tag often looks like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
 
Amit Ghorpade
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Hi fred,
I am well aware of the fact that you are amongst the most talented people out there, so with due respect to your post,I would like to say that
I know of XML behavior in a browser, it simply looks like
<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1" ?>
- <note>
<to>someone</to>
<from>me</from>
<heading>hello</heading>
<body>this is a hello message</body>
</note>

when you click on the " - ", the note tag winds up and a + is displayed, clicking it collapses the tag and again the tree is displayed.
Please correct me if I am wrong

Thanks in advance
 
fred rosenberger
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I am well aware of the fact that you are amongst the most talented people out there
That actually made me laugh out loud - but thanks for believing in me...

Perhaps i mis-understood your question (it's still pretty early here). I thought you were asking why an XML file might have a .jspa extension, and how the browser would know what to do with it. I was answering that question, not "why is the browser displaying what is XML in a non-xml kind of way".

can you provide a link to a specific example?
 
Ulf Dittmer
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This is one of those URLs: http://www.sun.com/training/catalog/courses/CX-310-083.xml

Keep in mind that just because a URL ends with "xml", that doesn't mean it's an XML file that will be sent to the browser. In this particular case it's obviously mapped to a server-side component that transforms it into HTML.
 
Amit Ghorpade
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Hi fred, Ulf thank you for the replies,
its great to see that special people like you bartenders/ sheriff's show willingness to answer even the most smallest of the questions
That is my most favorite part of the ranch


now Ulf's post cleared my confusion, although I had previously thought on similar grounds, but then I thought why would some do it that way, hence the confusion. Then came in the .jspa extension to add more confusion.
Then i felt like asp evolved into aspx, JSP's might have evolved into JSPA
And i was totally unaware of the new technology

now I guess its not like that

Although I am unable to get rid of some small percent of confusion remaining
Thanks for the help
[ April 17, 2008: Message edited by: Amit Ghorpade ]
 
Srikanth Rajkumar
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This is a very old post and I would like to add more details on this topic. Just because the URL ends with .xml, it does not mean that the response is going to be an XML. The browsers knows the type of response object based on the response header - Content-Type. Based on the content type, the browsers knows how to display the data. In the way an URL that ends with .xml can render an image by using a Content-Type response header.
 
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