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What Kind of American English Do You Speak?

 
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<h3>Your Linguistic Profile:</h3>
65% General American English
10% Dixie
10% Upper Midwestern
10% Yankee
5% Midwestern


<div align="center">
What Kind of American English Do You Speak?
</div>
 
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<h3>Your Linguistic Profile:</h3>
45% General American English
25% Yankee
20% Dixie
10% Upper Midwestern
0% Midwestern


<div align="center">
What Kind of American English Do You Speak?
</div>
 
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<h3>Your Linguistic Profile:</h3>
55% General American English
25% Yankee
10% Dixie
10% Upper Midwestern
0% Midwestern


<div align="center">
What Kind of American English Do You Speak?
</div>
 
Sheriff
Posts: 6450
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About as I'd expect.

<h3>Your Linguistic Profile:</h3>
45% Yankee
35% General American English
15% Upper Midwestern
5% Midwestern
0% Dixie


<div align="center">
What Kind of American English Do You Speak?
</div>
 
Bartender
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60 General, 20 Yankee, 15 Upper Midwestern, 5 Midwestern, 0 Dixie
...and not surprised at all.
[ April 27, 2005: Message edited by: Ryan McGuire ]
 
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<h3>Your Linguistic Profile:</h3>
75% General American English
10% Upper Midwestern
10% Yankee
5% Midwestern
0% Dixie


<div align="center">
What Kind of American English Do You Speak?
</div>
Unsurprising. I was annoyed however that "catacorner" was not listed as an option, so I chose "diagonal" as the best alternative.
 
blacksmith
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<h3>Your Linguistic Profile:</h3>
45% General American English
35% Yankee
15% Dixie
5% Upper Midwestern
0% Midwestern


<div align="center">
What Kind of American English Do You Speak?
</div>

Much more regional than I expected. I guess it's been too long since I visited Michigan, where I was born ... 15% Dixie???
 
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Can someone describe Dixie and Yankie please?
 
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Your Linguistic Profile:
60% General American English
30% Yankee
10% Dixie
0% Midwestern
0% Upper Midwestern
 
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Posts: 214
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<h3>Your Linguistic Profile:</h3>
45% General American English
35% Dixie
15% Yankee
5% Upper Midwestern
0% Midwestern


<div align="center">
What Kind of American English Do You Speak?
</div>
 
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<h3>Your Linguistic Profile:</h3>
40% General American English
25% Dixie
25% Yankee
5% Upper Midwestern
0% Midwestern


<div align="center">
What Kind of American English Do You Speak?
</div>


How can I speak American English when I speak in a cocky accent?! This test is pants.
 
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<h3>Your Linguistic Profile:</h3>
75% General American English
15% Upper Midwestern
5% Dixie
5% Yankee
0% Midwestern


<div align="center">
What Kind of American English Do You Speak?
</div>
 
Leverager of our synergies
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Do you all read prof. Liberman's blog?
<h3>Your Linguistic Profile:</h3>
70% General American English
15% Dixie
15% Yankee
0% Midwestern
0% Upper Midwestern


<div align="center">
What Kind of American English Do You Speak?
</div>
[ April 27, 2005: Message edited by: Mapraputa Is ]
 
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<h3>Your Linguistic Profile:</h3>
60% General American English
20% Dixie
15% Yankee
5% Midwestern
0% Upper Midwestern


<div align="center">
What Kind of American English Do You Speak?
</div>

Thought this would be a laugh; since I'm English, but have a northern (Newcastle, 'Geordie') accent. 20% Dixie, 15% Yankiee
I'm guessing that Dixie is like Jack Nicholson?

"The act of covering a house or area in front of a house with toilet paper is called..." - Eh? Why?
[ April 27, 2005: Message edited by: Peter Rooke ]
 
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<h3>Your Linguistic Profile:</h3>
65% General American English
20% Upper Midwestern
10% Yankee
5% Midwestern
0% Dixie


<div align="center">
What Kind of American English Do You Speak?
</div>
 
Ryan McGuire
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Originally posted by Rick Beaver:
Can someone describe Dixie and Yankie please?



South-east versus north-east United States.

"Dixie" is the group of states south of the Mason-Dixon line. The MD line is the southern border of Pennsylvania and the south-west border of Delaware. This line came into prominence later as the dividing line between states in the south, which allowed slavery, and those in the north, which didn't. (...except that Delaware was north of the MD line but allowed slavery.)

During the American Civil War, anyone from north of the line was a "yankee" or just plain "yank" and anyone from the south was a "rebel". After the war, the term "rebel" died out a bit since they weren't rebelling as much. However, the term "yankee" for anyone from the north has pretty much stuck to the present. Once you're north of the line, "yankee" was anyone from the New England area (the states east and north of New York). Once you get as far west as Ohio, you're in the Midwest.

Is "Yankee" derogatory? Depends on who's saying it. If a Alabama trooper catches you speeding and notices your Conneticut accent, and says something along the lines of "We do things a might different down here, Yankee," you can bet you're in trouble. I wouldn't feel insulted by the trooper as much as I'd realize that he was saying he felt no freindly cultural connection with me. But "The New Yankee Workshop" is a popular do-it-yourself woodworking show on Saturday mornings, and I'd be proud to be associated with it.

If you buy into the stereotypes, Yankees are harder working and better craftsmen, but Southerners are friendlier and better cooks. Needless to say, there are negative stereotypes as well.

So what's the difference between the dialects? Quite a few accent and wording changes. It is easy to identify someone from New England or someone from the Deep South (Florida doesn't count). The epitome of the Dixie dialect is "y'all", a contraction of "you all", for the second person plural pronoun. A good New England yankee-ism might be using "ayup"* for "yes" or pronouncing the "wa" in "wash" like "wore". e.g. "Mom woreshed my clothes." I grew up in New York state, so I don't know how much of my accent/dialect is is northern/yankee and how much is standard.

From Peter Rooke:
I'm guessing that Dixie is like Jack Nicholson?

Why no. Mr. Nicholson is from New Jersey. He definitely sounded more New Jersey-ish early in his career. Now he sounds more Hollywood.

People in show business often try to get rid of a "Dixie" southern accent. For instance, I wouldn't guess that Morgan Freeman is from Mississippi. The best example of a famous person that hasn't lost his Souther accent that I can think of is ex-President Jimmy Carter.

Peter: "The act of covering a house or area in front of a house with toilet paper is called..." - Eh? Why?

A prank. Often done on Halloween. Also popular to do to the high school principal's house the Friday nigh before graduation. I would say 80% of the time the participants are drunk.


There, is that more information that you wanted?

Ryan


* To pronounce "ayup"... Start with a long 'a' as in "cape" and hold it for twice as long as usual. The 'u' is short as in "under". The 'p' isn't pronounced; rather it represents a sudden stop of the 'u' with the back of the toungue. Don't even bring your lips together at the end.
 
Jason Menard
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Another yankee-ism: "Wicked". When I was young, things weren't just cool, they were often wicked. If something was really great, it may have been way wicked or even wicked cool. Wicked good was also used on occasion, as in "That's a wicked good fastball Eckersley's got." "Wicked" could pretty much be used with almost any adjective. The ending "d" in "wicked" was barely emphasized, and in fact often sounded like a "t".

Adam Sandler grew up in New Hampshire, so you'll often hear his characters use this term in his movies.

Another one: "Can't get there from here." Used when someone asks for directions. Basically it means you went the wrong way and there's no easy way to get to where you want to go from where you are now. When directions are given, references to where landmarks used to be will often be given.

Usage: "What's that pal? You want the onramp for 95? You can't get there from here. Go back up Jefferson Blvd until you see the guy selling flowers on the corner. Take a left after the Dunkin Donuts down through where the Sand Pits used to be until you get to the intersection. Don't turn there. Keep going until you see the sign for 95 and then just follow it. You can't miss it."
 
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<h3>Your Linguistic Profile:</h3>
50% General American English
20% Dixie
20% Yankee
10% Upper Midwestern
0% Midwestern


<div align="center">
What Kind of American English Do You Speak?
</div>
 
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Your Linguistic Profile:
35% General American English
30% Dixie
30% Yankee
5% Upper Midwestern
0% Midwestern
 
Rancher
Posts: 13459
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<h3>Your Linguistic Profile:</h3>
45% General American English
35% Yankee
20% Dixie
0% Midwestern
0% Upper Midwestern


No midwestern.
I put this forward as a sample of the migration of American language into the Australian tongue, but I also claim they all originate in Oz, making me 100% Oz, 0% midwestern
 
Jim Yingst
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[Gerald]: How can I speak American English when I speak in a cocky accent?! This test is pants.

[DOM]: I put this forward as a sample of the migration of American language into the Australian tongue


The survey results don't seem to offer any data at all regarding any non-American dialects. It doesn't pretend to. The title of the survey makes this clear, doesn't it? The assumption is that you speak some sort of American English, and if so, the survey tries to determine what type. If the initial assumption is invalid, I can't see why anyone should think the survey means anything.
 
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Your Linguistic Profile:
50% General American English
25% Yankee
15% Upper Midwestern
5% Dixie
5% Midwestern

Canadian!
 
peter wooster
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Originally posted by Ryan McGuire:
... A good New England yankee-ism might be using "ayup"* for "yes" or pronouncing the "wa" in "wash" like "wore". e.g. "Mom woreshed my clothes." ...



Actually this pronunciation was once very common in Canada, but has died out as the more standard TV-American has taken over.

The only word you still hear pronounced like that frequently is the American capital Warshington, but that's probably an imitation of the Yankees, a term used here to refer to all Americans, regardless of North vs South.
 
Jason Menard
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A good New England yankee-ism might be using "ayup"* for "yes" or pronouncing the "wa" in "wash" like "wore". e.g. "Mom woreshed my clothes."

Maybe it's the part of New England I grew up in, but I didn't know anyone who said things like "worshed". We dropped our R's, we didn't add any extra ones. I've heard this repeated often enough that it must be true somewhere (Maine?), but I've never seen it.
 
Warren Dew
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Jason Menard:

Maybe it's the part of New England I grew up in, but I didn't know anyone who said things like "worshed".

I've heard it from a nonzero minority of lifelong Bostonians.
 
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