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no red ink in schools

 
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Recently I heard that school boards are thinking about banishing red color from school - I mean for teachers - they won't be able to use red color ink pen to grade/correct papers. Argument is , when students see their work all marked in red (may for expected correction) it brings down their morals and hurt their feelings. They are coming up with other colors - like purple for grading, but not red. Isn't that ridiculous and a royal waste of time.

I think kids 'feeling's are way too much overrated in US schools any way.
 
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This speaks to an article I read a couple months back in USA Today. The premise was that these types of measures meant to protect children from hurt feelings of criticism end up in the long run hurting them. They grow up and enter the work force where they will often face criticism of their work, and they have a hard time deealing with it. They are not showered with praise at every turn as they were as children and have trouble coping.

Same is true with contests where educators have stopped declaring winners (I even heard some spelling bees being cancelled) in an effort to spare the non-winners disappointment. What happens when these kids grow up and have to really compete for jobs, and they don't win?

Sometimes life is disappointing, and educators are doing kids a disservice trying to protect them from this rather than help them deal with it.
 
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Originally posted by Art Vandelay:
[QB][/QB]



Are you the famous Art Vandelay from

Seinfeld?
[ May 13, 2005: Message edited by: Jesse Torres ]
 
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Originally posted by Jesse Torres:

Are you the famous Art Vandelay from

Seinfeld?

[ May 13, 2005: Message edited by: Jesse Torres ]



That couldn't be, I'm sure she's read the naming policy and knows better than to disguise herself as a obviously fictional person.
 
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"Art Vandelay",
unfortunately we didn't pick it up sooner, like as soon as you registered, but your display name is not valid and will have to be changed.

Please edit your profile and select a valid display name. Accounts with invalid display names get deleted, often without warning, and it would a shame if your account suddenly disappeared after more than 40 posts

Dave
 
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Originally posted by David O'Meara:
"Art Vandelay",
unfortunately we didn't pick it up sooner, like as soon as you registered, but your display name is not valid and will have to be changed.



It could be valid name also .. but I will leave it for JR. :-|

AW Coke colour is red, McDowell colour is red, most of the nion lights are in red colour... at least in India McDowell target children as their customer with their red color..

Whats wrong with red.. and whats good with purple ..
 
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Originally posted by peter wooster:


That couldn't be, I'm sure she's read the naming policy and knows better than to disguise herself as a obviously fictional person.



She's probably been too busy with her importing/exporting business to read the guidelines.
 
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Originally posted by Art Vandelay:
[QB]..Same is true with contests where educators have stopped declaring winners (I even heard some spelling bees being cancelled) in an effort to spare the non-winners disappointment. What happens when these kids grow up and have to really compete for jobs, and they don't win?...[QB]



Perhaps those who argue the anti-competition point are just highlighting than in most cases in life things arent a contest and that there is usualy a "mutualy beneficial" outcome possible from most interactions?

All too often we see software engineers & clients arguing about whose fault it was that the delivered software isnt working - arguments about whether something was or wasnt "in the specification". We end up with a mentality where theres an inherent competition between developers and clients ('loser' end up paying for fixes). Perhaps if we werent brainwashed into believing that life is a competition we could concentrate more on operating as a TEAM and doing the rigth thing to get stuff working more effectively rather than worrying constantly about WINNING!!!

Perhaps the over-competetive mindset that we live with is illustrated by the explosion of the legal industry? - Lawyers dont understand the concept of resolutions without "winners" or "losers". Perhaps trying to educate our children toward a more conciliatory approach to life might help defend us all against the litigationalization that is surely destroying our lives?! (ok - I made up that word - but you know what I mean )
 
David O'Meara
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I think red was commonly used to allow marking to be highlighted on assignments, so it would show up. If teachers are told to switch from red to green the students may start to feel the same about green ink.

However, red has the additional, natural 'warning' instinct, and I'm not sure this can be discounted from my argiment...
 
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Competition is healthy and necessary. There are winners and losers in life, and the earlier kids are taught this this the better off they'll be in the long run.

And now there's no dodgeball allowed in schools! I think that just about says it all!
 
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cooperation is also healthy and necessary.
 
Jason Menard
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Originally posted by Marcus Green:
cooperation is also healthy and necessary.



Cooperation and competition are not mutually exclusive.
 
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Cooperation and Competition. Isn't that what every team sport is? People cooperating with each other in order to compete against another group of people.

Personally I think this whole we don't want to praise acheivement because it might hurt somebody elses feeling/self-esteem thing is just ridiculous.

This is where things like Fuzzy Math come from.

One of the many reasons US public schools are in the crapper.
 
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Its all a bit silly really. Increasing a child's knowledge is only a small part of education - helping them to fit in, and interact productively, with the rest of society is just as important. If we educate them in an environment where nobody is praised or punished, no-one is seen as better or worse, and there are no winners and losers will make them incredibly unprepared for the less caring and some times vicious adult world. How will they cope the first time their boss gives them a roasting for doing a bit of work wrong? Or the first time one of their colleagues gets promoted over them?

Like it or loath it, most of is live in a capitalist leaning environment, where the entire economic framework is based around the idea of people competing against each other. Its the law of the jungle out there, and people who have no experience of competing with their peers could suffer in this kind of environment.
 
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Originally posted by Dave Lenton:
Its all a bit silly really. Increasing a child's knowledge is only a small part of education - helping them to fit in, and interact productively, with the rest of society is just as important.

Normally, the family is able to do that on its own, through interactions of the child with father and mother (authority), siblings and playmates (peers).

When racism was(?) the norm, schools needed to teach children how to interact with children of other races, which they _didn't_ get at home. (I suppose schools no longer do that -- lest they impute a negative connotation to the racist attitudes of the child and his family, thereby hurting the child's self-esteem.)

If we educate them in an environment where nobody is praised or punished, no-one is seen as better or worse, and there are no winners and losers will make them incredibly unprepared for the less caring and some times vicious adult world. How will they cope the first time their boss gives them a roasting for doing a bit of work wrong? Or the first time one of their colleagues gets promoted over them?

They ought to be able to get that from family, friends and sports. The dilemma is how to change the child (i.e. how to give him new skills, knowlege and habits) without hurting his self-esteem by implying that there is anything unsatisfactory about his current state. Educational conservatives are willing to risk the child's self-esteem in the pursuit of learning, educational progressives are less willing.

Competition in learning (or working) is merely to provide some excitement, to get the heart racing and create some enthusiasm for tasks which otherwise would be quite dull.

Measurement and tracking is only so that schools can most efficiently allocate their resources. Unless you're trying to promote equality at the expense of all other goals, there's no point in trying to teach algebra to an 8th grader who doesn't understand fractions or long division to a child who is already working through geometry. But some people are willing to tolerate more inequality than others.

Like it or loath it, most of is live in a capitalist leaning environment, where the entire economic framework is based around the idea of people competing against each other. Its the law of the jungle out there, and people who have no experience of competing with their peers could suffer in this kind of environment.

There's really no escaping competition. In East Germany children competed over who could best articulate Marxist theory and over who were most enthusiastic about communism. Secret police competed over who could develop the most productive informants, etc. Whereas in our system people compete over who can offer customers the most value for the money.
 
Dave Lenton
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Originally posted by Frank Silbermann:
Originally posted by Dave Lenton:
Increasing a child's knowledge is only a small part of education - helping them to fit in, and interact productively, with the rest of society is just as important.


Normally, the family is able to do that on its own, through interactions of the child with father and mother (authority), siblings and playmates (peers).



The interaction with peers is a very important part of a child's education. I'm not sure that a small group of siblings and playmates in a family environment will always be enough. Being in a school will give a child experience of being in a much larger group. It also probably does the child good to be able to interact with other people of their age group without having their parents watching over them. Of course a child's family play an important role in getting a child ready for society, but so does schooling.

This is one reason why I'd prefer to send a child of mine to a mixed-sex school with students from a range of backgrounds. This would provide the child with a good experience of different kinds of people. I know of some people who went to schools with only one sub set of people (for example rich, clever and female) and as an adult had difficulty interacting with people not from this sub set.

When racism was(?) the norm, schools needed to teach children how to interact with children of other races, which they _didn't_ get at home.



I think this is still quite an important job of a school, although it probably doesn't need to be implicitly taught. By providing an atmosphere where by children can interact with children from other "racial" groups, the children can learn that people who look different are actually no different. When you see children of different "races" playing together in schools, its a real hopeful sign that racism can be kicked out.
 
Yeah. What he said. Totally. Wait. What? Sorry, I was looking at this tiny ad:
Building a Better World in your Backyard by Paul Wheaton and Shawn Klassen-Koop
https://coderanch.com/wiki/718759/books/Building-World-Backyard-Paul-Wheaton
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