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The amount Movies Pull In:

 
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With this star wars thing you hear about how much money a movie pulls in.

Now they were comparing to older movies and how much they made. Than I was thinking inflation....A movie back then cost $4 maximum, not we are talking $8-10+.

Do they take that into consideration? I have not seen anything written on that, wondering if anyone else has.

Eric
 
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Yes - here is one such listing. This is based on ticket price, not cost to make, but it's a start. There are doubtless many ways to go about adjusting for inflation, depending where you get your data.
 
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Originally posted by Eric Pascarello:
With this star wars thing you hear about how much money a movie pulls in.

Now they were comparing to older movies and how much they made. Than I was thinking inflation....A movie back then cost $4 maximum, not we are talking $8-10+.

Do they take that into consideration? I have not seen anything written on that, wondering if anyone else has.

Eric



The movie industry doesn�t take inflation into account because they claim that it would only confuse matters. According to an article that I once read, if inflation were taken into account, the highest grossing movie of all time would be Gone with the Wind.

Titanic grossed $600 million domestically when tickets were about 25% to 30% less than today. So even if ROTS domestically surpasses $600, it will have done so with the advantage of higher ticket prices.

I believe that the total tally should be counted by the number of tickets sold and not the gross amount. As I earlier mentioned, today�s movies have the advantage that movie prices are more expensive. Or, inflation should be used in the equation to really determine which movie has grossed the most.
[ May 23, 2005: Message edited by: Jesse Torres ]
 
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the total tally should be counted by the number of tickets sold



(just to be politly argumentative)

ah, but there are more people on the planet today, and also films show in more theatres today than ever before. i'm betting that in 1939, there was only a couple of movie houses in even some of the largest cities, with one screen each. so it's much easier for more people to see a film today, and there are more people who CAN see a film.


So, in my opinion, using raw ticket numbers isn't a valid method of comparison either.
[ May 23, 2005: Message edited by: fred rosenberger ]
 
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And then there are DVD sales.

Product-tie-ins are not counted as part of movie gross, so you don't need to worry that your Jar-Jar bed-side lamp counts towards the movie tally.
 
Eric Pascarello
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Didn't star wars pull in 5Mil and Products 9Mil?

Eric
 
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The price of a movie ticket never directly reflects the cost of making the film, but rather what movie distributors and theaters believe people will pay to see a film. If price-follows-demand applied to film showings, strictly speaking, you'd arguably see a difference in price on a per-film basis according to demand. Fact is, you pay more according to the time you enter the theater than you do for the specific film you want to watch.
 
Jesse Torres
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Originally posted by fred rosenberger:


(just to be politly argumentative)

ah, but there are more people on the planet today, and also films show in more theatres today than ever before. i'm betting that in 1939, there was only a couple of movie houses in even some of the largest cities, with one screen each. so it's much easier for more people to see a film today, and there are more people who CAN see a film.

[ May 23, 2005: Message edited by: fred rosenberger ]



So if more people can see a film today because of the number of theatres, todeay's movies should yield a higher gross than yesterday's movies when adjusted for inflation. That is not the case though. More and more people choose to either rent or purchase a movie. That was not the case during the release of Gone with the Wind. So naturally, movies played in theatres for a very long time.
 
Jesse Torres
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Originally posted by Eric Pascarello:
Didn't star wars pull in 5Mil and Products 9Mil?

Eric



Are you referring to Episode III or the original Star Wars?
 
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