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Where did your home town get its name from?

 
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Following on from the threads about the meaning of surnames and where people were born, live and/or work, I started thinking about the combination - the meanings of the names of various different towns.

So, where does the name of the place you were born, live or work in come from?

I guess many in the "new world" will be quite easy. There's a huge number, such as New York, Boston, Newark and so on which are named after English towns. Even some of the trickier ones like Philadelphia aren't that hard for anyone with a smattering of Greek.

In the "old world" things are a bit trickier, as many of the names are very old indeed. It could be quite interesting to hear about the root of town names in different countries as well.

I was born in Reading. The "ing" bit comes from the Saxon word for "settlement". The first part of the word is likely to be named after someone, so Readings probably means something like Settlement of Readda's People.

London, where I live, is a bit more tricky. Before being called "London", the Romans called it "Londinium". Before that things are less clear. Although there were pre-Roman settlements, and the Roman name was probably based upon the pre-Roman name, no one knows exactly what it was. The more likely theories include it coming from a word meaning "wild place" or "flowing river".
 
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birth-Ratnagiri-Ratna-Gem Giri-Hill
Broughtup-Mumbai(Bombay)-Two theories.
1)From the godess Mumbadevi
2)From Portuguese phrase bom bahia means "good bay" when they ruled during 16th and 17th century
Now at -Bangalore- means city of baked beans.
 
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I was born in Pistoia (Italy).The origin of the city of Pitoia is linked to the northward expansion of the Roman state. At the beginning of the second century before Christ, when the Romans engaged in a bitter war against the Ligurian peoples in the Appenine hills, Pistoia was probably a fortified city (oppidum) that served as a supply post for the legions. lts name Pistoria, Pistoriae or Pistorium may be indicative of this role because pistoria in Latin denotes the oven used for baking bread.
 
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"Aldershot" probably derives from "a wet boggy place"

Hey Dave - you were only up the road
 
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Mogon was the name of a deity of the celts settling around here. The romans founded a castle for their legion and derived (Castrum) Mogontiacum from it. There was also the short form Moguntia. Over the millenniums it transformed to the today's name Mainz.
cb
[ November 03, 2005: Message edited by: Chris Baron ]
 
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Originally posted by Chris Baron:
Sorry, pressed "quote" instead of "edit" :roll:

[ November 03, 2005: Message edited by: Chris Baron ]



Ya know...
1. Once you hit the Quote link, you can just hit your browser's Back button to NOT add a reply.
2. You can delete a message by hitting the edit link, clicking the Delete Post checkbox and hitting Edit Post.
[ November 03, 2005: Message edited by: Ryan McGuire ]
 
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Minneapolis simply means a city in the state of Minnesota.

The name of this state came from the Minnesota River so named by the Dakota Sioux for the river's "cloudy" or "milky water." The Dakota word "mnishota" means "cloudy" or "milky water.
 
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Almora name was derived from a plant Kilmora which is found in abundance in this place.
 
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I was born in the city of Madras in India.

The name Madras is derived from Madraspatnam, the site chosen by the British East India Company for a permanent settlement in 1639. Another small town, Chennapatnam, lay to the south of it. In due course the two towns were merged, and the term Madras was favoured over Chennai by the British. The city was renamed Chennai in 1996 as the name Madras was perceived to be of Portuguese origin. It is believed that the original portuguese name is Madre de Sois, named after a Portuguese high authority who was one among the early settlers in 1500. However, there have been suggestions that in fact Chennai is not a Tamil name while Madras might indeed be one.

courtesy - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chennai
 
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San Francisco is named after St. Francis de Assisi, Patron Saint of Animals and the Environment.
 
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OK...

I grew up in the village of "Oakley" which was an old enough place to get a mention in the doomsday book of 1086. Quite literally a "Leigh" is a clearing in a wood so "Oakley" we can reasonably deduce was a clearing in an area with lots of Oak trees.

I now live in Brisbane which was name after the governor of NSW 'Thomas Brisbane' at the time of its settlement in 1823 - Not all that exciting. The suburb I live in is called "The Gap" simply because it exists in a gap between the hills that surround Brisbane. (Imaginative lot these early Australians werent they?!)
 
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Jarrow, UK: The town derives its name from its Anglo-Saxon name "Gyrwe" (pronounced Yeerweh), which means marsh or fen. Like most English towns it was a Roman fort.

Jarrow is known for one thing: St. Paul's, in Jarrow was the home of the Venerable Bede in the 7th century. Bede is best known for his religious writing.
 
Dave Lenton
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Originally posted by Rick Beaver:
"Aldershot" probably derives from "a wet boggy place"

Hey Dave - you were only up the road


Indeed, I used to live just up the road in Wokingham. That comes from the ancient Saxon word for "quite boring place, where nothing much happens"

Its surprised me how many people at the 'ranch are familiar with the area, given that there are only a few Brits here.
 
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Nelapogula(telugu).
Pogula --> combination
Nela --> Land

The village was formed as blessing from Raja of mogalthuru and given by combining land from different nearby villages.
 
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