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Configuration of your first home PC.

 
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Mine is:
Year of purchase: 1998.
Pentium IV 450MH.
32 MB RAM
8.4 Gigs.(My firend asked if I want to quit my bed and sleep on the hard-disk.)
 
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You mean Pentium II right?

Mine was:

Year:1998
Pentium II 400Mhz
64Mb RAM
8Gb HDD
Voodoo I graphics card I think
Windows 95 <-- ack

Currently:

Year:2005
Pentium 4 3.6GHz
2048Mb RAM
250Gb SATA HDD
Radeon XT800GT 256DDR Graphics card
Windows XP Pro <-- ack
 
Amitabh Reddy
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Originally posted by Rick Beaver:
[QB]You mean Pentium II right?

I am sorry. It was Pentium III.

 
author and iconoclast
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- Texas Instruments TI-99/4A, purchased 1982 (?)
- 16K internal memory, with a 32K expansion pack
- No disk drives -- but a cassette tape adapter!
- The editor/assembler software came on a cartridge!

I wrote clones of PacMan and Asteroids in assembly language on that puppy.

It was a really wonderful machine. TI introduced it at $1050, which was very expensive; by 1982 you could get one for less than $200 after rebate.

You could write parts of a program in BASIC, and do the heavy lifting in assembler; mixing the two was easy. Instead of having data registers, the processor used an arbitrary chunk of main memory addressed via the "workspace pointer". There was an instruction BLWP (Branch and Load Workspace Pointer, but in my head I say "Blowup") which is how you called a subroutine. A subroutine call needed two arguments: the location of the code, and the location for the workspace pointer. To call a routine, you'd put the "parameters" into a block of memory to serve as the workspace, then branch.

Because everything used absolute addresses, you were almost encouraged to write self-modifying code.

I had no printer. I used to write the assembly mnemonics out in an engineering notebook, along with a sort of colored map I'd make to show how memory was laid out. It was glorious.

Man I wish I had that notebook now.
 
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Mr. Peabody sets the Way-Back Machine to 1992:

486 DX50
212M disk
8M RAM
14" monitor
Windows 3.1

Fast forward to today:

PowerMac dual 866M
about 900G combined disk space
1.2G RAM
23" Cinema Display
Mac OS X 10.4
[ November 03, 2005: Message edited by: Bear Bibeault ]
 
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Lets see, my family purchased an Apple IIc in 1984. It was blazing fast with the 128K of RAM. We had an internal and external 5.25 drive. I taught myself how to program in Apple BASICm, and found out for the first time what an Easter Egg was (the 100 IN#5 : INPUT A$ : PRINT A$ thing).

The first computer I bought on my own was a HP 486 DX2 in 1995. I was the first person on my block to upgrade to the new Windows 95, and I had 4 Megabytes of RAM...
 
Rick Beaver
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Originally posted by Bear Bibeault:
23" Cinema Display



Drool
 
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Mine was:

Year:1998
Pentium II 400Mhz
128MB RAM
10 GB HD
Windows 98
2X DVD-ROM
17" Monitor
56K Modem

Since then I have added the following:
Expanded RAM to 384MB
Added a 160GB HD
Upgraded to Win XP Pro SP2
Added 12X CD Burner
Added 16X DVD Burner
Added NIC Card

The computer is still going on strong, despite being relatively slow when compared with newer models.

So I went out a purchased a used PC:

Pentium 4 1.7Ghz
512MB RAM
160GB HD
19" monitor
Win XP Pro SP2
52X CD Burner
16X DVD Burner
 
High Plains Drifter
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Mmm...I spent a lot of years on borrowed systems or on time-shared teletype consoles on the Berkeley campus and at the Lawrence Hall of Science. The first one I owned was probably an IBM XT clone, 8 MB RAM, amber monochrome monitor, and a 10 MB hard drive. *Half-height" mind you. I could have doubled any time I wanted, but I don't like to strut.

I'm thinking 1984 or 5.
 
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Amstrad "Twin Floppy" Thing:
PC1640 (aka PC6400) - 1987

The PC1640 is based on the PC1512 design; the major difference is that the motherboard CGA chipset is disabled and replaced by an EGA chipset (very similar in capabilities to a Paradise EGA card). Memory is 640k as standard.

Specifications:

* 8086 at 8MHz
* 640k RAM
* One or two 360k 5.25" floppy drives; optional hard drive
* MDA, Hercules, CGA, Plantronics or EGA display compatibility
* MDA, CGA or EGA monitor (power supply is in the monitor)
* Four full sized 8-bit ISA slots (one hidden inside the case; the other
three in the expansion bay)
* Battery-backed real time clock
* 75-key keyboard (XT-style, function keys on the left)
* Amstrad CPC-compatible joystick interface
* Software: MS-DOS 3.2, GEM 2.0, BASIC2 1.21

Around this time I was at college. We got to program (in assembly language
/ machine code) an Intel 8088 "brief-case" type machine. We made LED flash
on and off!
 
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1995
HP vectra vl/2
482 dx2 66
340 Mb HD
8 MB RAM
scsi cd-rom
win 3.11 / os2 warp / slackware linux

2004
HP
Celeron 2.4
40 GB HD
128 MB RAM
ide cd rw
xp home


 
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I started off with the BBC Model B in 1984
http://www.old-computers.com/museum/computer.asp?st=1&c=29

Then in 1990 I upgraded to an Acorn Archimedes
http://www.old-computers.com/museum/computer.asp?st=1&c=697

The in 1992 I (depending on how you look at it) downgraded to a
Commodore Amiga A1200
http://www.old-computers.com/museum/computer.asp?st=1&c=628

My first PC was a Dell XPS D233. It was a PII 233MHz machine with 32MB memory and a 4 GB Hard Drive.

I currently use a 2.4GHZ Athlon based Emachine. Hmmm, computers seemed more fun prior to my PC Days :-)
[ November 03, 2005: Message edited by: Mark Fletcher ]
 
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Nice site Mark!
The Olivetti P6060 was the first computer i wrote programms for . At school. It was the only one for all pupils and we could use it in groups-of-3 for 15 minutes once a week.
cb
[ November 03, 2005: Message edited by: Chris Baron ]
 
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Well first time programming, 1977 on Commodore Pet in third grade, but I didn't own that, the school did. The first one I could get was the original 128K Macintosh during the summer of 1984.

Mark
 
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First home PC was:

IBM PC/XT
8088 with 8087 coprocessor
640k ram
CGA video
2 half height floppy disks (5 1/4)
1 20 megabyte half height hard drive

First home computer was:

Commodore 64
5 1/4 serial floppy disk drive
cassette drive
dot matrix printer

Henry
 
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I learned BASIC on the TI/99-4A mentioned by Ernest (but I never did any of the assembly stuff....) I picked it up around 1987 for about $50.

We also had a Timex-Sinclair 1000, which was a pain to program on. You couldn't type "GOTO;" you had to press the "Function" key and then find the key that had the "GOTO" function on it.

You could also print weird graphics characters, which we accomplished by pressing the "Char" (or whatever) key and finding the key with the graphics character that you wanted.

My first "modern" computer was a Macintosh Performa 637CD, with a 350 Mb hard drive, a 33Mhz Motorola 68040 processor, and 16Mb RAM, purchaed in June 1995 (If I had waited 2 months, I could have gotton a Power-PC....)
 
Bear Bibeault
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Originally posted by Rick Beaver:


Drool



Yeah, it's sweet! It's the older model (not the new aluminum one), but I actually like it better.

Best part is I got it in trade for some (easy) consulting work that I did.
 
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In 1981 as an inquisitive 9yr old I had one of these babies:
http://www.old-computers.com/museum/computer.asp?st=1&c=263
The amazing Sinclair ZX81 - it had an enormous 1k of RAM, but later on a got a 16K expansion RAM pack that plugged into the back (which was great until the unit wobbled and the whole thing crashed!). Another greate feature was the sealed 'touch' keyboard that you could spill drinks over and wipe them off without fear of any damage!

A couple of years later I was given an Acorn Electron for xmas and my programming skills reached new heights - I also got addicted to many of the games of the time and spend many hours waiting for games to load from tape (from memory I think some of them took about 45 minutes to load - and if the volume of the tape deck wasnt EXACTLY right - it failed and you had to start again!)
http://www.old-computers.com/museum/computer.asp?st=1&c=121

After reaching my mid-teens and discovering other joyous things (like guitars, girls and drink)I succesfully avoided computers for many years until I finished my degree (1994)- whereupon I was presented with a graduation gift from my parents of a PC:
486 SX 33
4MB RAM
250MB HDD
Turtle Beach Sound cards
Some AWFUL sequencing/sampliing/MIDI controlling software
Windows 3.11 (errrrg)

Then when I left the UK and arrived in Australia I had the oportunity of 'recieving' a PC for very little funds and got what is my current home PC:
IBM Aptive PIII 450
10GB HDD
256MB RAM
Win NT4

Of course the only thing I ever use the home machine for is occassionaly browsing so I have no reason to upgrade despite its lowly performance!
 
Paul Bourdeaux
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The amazing Sinclair ZX81

Too funny! When I was 6 my parents got the US version for putting up with a time share sales pitch. I couldn't remember the name, but I recognized it immediately when I followed your link! I too remember waiting and waiting for games to load off from tape, just to find out that they didn't load correctly!

This was a year or two before we got the apple, so I guess I stand corrected on my last post.
 
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I was hoping to see another Commodore in here.

1982
Commodore Vic20
Datasette drive

Used my 19" TV for a monitor.

You didn't want to get the Datasette cable to close to the tv screen as it would scramble the signal and you would fail your extremely, long, long, long load. (followed by a stream of curses)
 
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1999,
Cyrix M II Processor
4 GB Hard Disk
32 MB Ram
1.44 Floppy
No CD/DVD/Sound Card
14" Monochrome Monitor

Was mostly used for viewing jpegs and writing C Programs (Turbo C 2.0)
 
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1987 apple 2e
 
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1998
64 MB RAM
1 GB HD
Windows.I took on rent for 3months
now
2002
128 MB RAM
40 GB HD
Mandrake 10.1
 
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First home PC
2000 - August

PIII
64 MB RAM
10 GB HDD
Windows 98


Janhavi.
 
Jesus Angeles
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this seems to disclose our age

i wish i could say my first pc is a p4
 
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8/1997 (the same month Princess Diana died)
san jose, ca
Compaq Presario desktop, off the shelf, only thing i can remember is 24 MB RAM.
[ November 04, 2005: Message edited by: Roger Johnson ]
 
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Originally posted by Stephen Boston:
You didn't want to get the Datasette cable to close to the tv screen as it would scramble the signal and you would fail your extremely, long, long, long load. (followed by a stream of curses)



I remember those days, we'd start the load, walk out of the room very carefully, then go play outside while Gauntlet loaded. Then we'd come back in and play games all day
 
Henry Wong
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Originally posted by David O'Meara:

I remember those days, we'd start the load, walk out of the room very carefully, then go play outside while Gauntlet loaded. Then we'd come back in and play games all day



I still remember how happy I was when I first used the commodore 1541. It is amazing how easy it is to accept a slow serial-port-connected disk drive, when you upgraded from a cassette drive.

Henry
 
Stephen Boston
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Heh! That came much later.
The datasette came later too. I had gotten the Vic20 first and picked up the datasette a month later.

I remember my brother and I wrote a program (it was very long in cbm basic) and got it where it was working well. But we had no datasette to save it on.

We spend the next 4+ hours (Way into the morning) writing the program code out on paper.
 
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IBM XT, 256K, one floppy, one IBM 10 meg hard drive & color monitor. My uncle used his employee discount for me; still over $5k I think. I had to take out a loan! I bought a "six pack" card to give it extra ports and 640K memory. External modem, Epson dot matrix printer. Software included Turbo Pascal 1.1, IBM macro assembler and version 1.0 of the KEDIT editor; I still use the Windows version of KEDIT daily.

My dad's home equipment included two AppleII, one tricked out to 32k and a lower case font kit. Is there any market for these museum pieces? My mother is about to close out her house and I'd love to find them a good home. 2 floppy drives, 1 original Apple monitor. E-mail me if you have any ideas.
 
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1983? (I think)
- Commodore 64
- Datasette tape drive initially, then upgrade to disk drive
- used 95% for playing games, 5% for attempting to write programs in Basic mainly the likes of:

10 PRINT "Wooohooo!"
20 GOTO 10

Still have that machine somewhere.
 
Peter Rooke
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Home computer - Spectrum 48K, with those plastic keys (still got one - some where). Best game - Way of the Exploding Fist.

In town, we would find a computer shop with demo computers and run programs like this:

The randomize line would produce those yellow and blue border lines, that made it look as if a games was being loaded! People would wait, and wait, and wait.
Anyone recall Crash?
[ November 07, 2005: Message edited by: Peter Rooke ]
 
Stephen Boston
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Originally posted by James Swan:
1983? (I think)
- Commodore 64
- Datasette tape drive initially, then upgrade to disk drive
- used 95% for playing games, 5% for attempting to write programs in Basic mainly the likes of:

10 PRINT "Wooohooo!"
20 GOTO 10

Still have that machine somewhere.




Hey! I have the copyright on that program! (ok not really)
 
You firghten me terribly. I would like to go home now. Here, take this tiny ad:
Building a Better World in your Backyard by Paul Wheaton and Shawn Klassen-Koop
https://coderanch.com/wiki/718759/books/Building-World-Backyard-Paul-Wheaton
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