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High Rate of H-1B Visa Fraud and Top H-1B Employers

 
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http://www.businessweek.com/bwdaily/dnflash/content/oct2008/db2008108_844949.htm


http://www.businessweek.com/table/0518_h1btable.htm
 
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What is up with all the universities on that list? I'd think they could have the pick of the litter of each graduating class. Then again, if their computer science programs are anything like my school's, most of the class is foreign-born anyway. . .
 
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I don't know about those universities, but my son is an assistant professor at one of the University of California campuses and he's on an H1-B visa. They aren't only for IT, you know.
 
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Originally posted by Joe Ess:
... if their computer science programs are anything like my school's, most of the class is foreign-born anyway. . .



Why is that? Is this because science and engineering are too hard for US-born? Not rewarding? One of my US-born friends proudly said that they do not care about math and science, but only business. He is doing his MBA in a small local university.

If everyone of the US-born only wants "counting money" like many MBAs doing, who is creating the money for them to count? Foreign-born!

Many US-born choose law, business, or medical schools over schools of science or engineering because of rewarding and engineers' job can be off-shored easily.

One of the presidential candidate said that US workers are strong, but he forgot that US workers are much more costly than other countries'. This is why H1B exists. It is one of the programs to make US workers more competitive in the mean time to make CEOs and politicians richer.
 
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Originally posted by Glen Cai:

Many US-born choose law, business, or medical schools over schools of science or engineering because of rewarding and engineers' job can be off-shored easily.



Can you provide some evidence of this from a reputed source or is it just your opinion?

The ABA is reporting 148,698 students enrolled in laws schools in 2008.

Business schools typically only enroll a few hundred students per year and are usually smaller and less numerous than law or medical schools.

The AAMC notes that there was 17,759 matriculations in 2007 (so multiple that by 4).

The NSF lists 474,203 science and egineering grad students in 2004 although it's not clear if this number includes medical schools.


So while we can't argue with why someone might choose one profession over another there is clearly more demand for science and engineering education than for medical and law.

(And before someone claims it's because of foreign students, check the numbers before you post, they don't make up that large a percentage.)


--Mark
 
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Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:

(...)
So while we can't argue with why someone might choose one profession over another there is clearly more demand for science and engineering education than for medical and law.
(...)
--Mark



Actually, you've just demonstrated that there is more supply from science and engineering education than from medical and law. You are still some distance from showing that translates to "more demand".

- Anand
 
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Originally posted by Paul Clapham:
... my son is an assistant professor at one of the University of California campuses and he's on an H1-B visa...



I thought they are using a different program long before H1B was created.
What visa did Arnold Schwarzenegger use when he immigrated to US?
 
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Originally posted by Glen Cai:
I thought they are using a different program long before H1B was created.
What visa did Arnold Schwarzenegger use when he immigrated to US?



Considering that was 40 years ago, I don't think there's any relation to what exists today.

Cheers!

Luke
 
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Like the old saying goes "fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice shame on me". You need to fix or at least work towards finding a solution to remedy this problem. Numerous times I have considered coming to the U.S. myself but I know exactly the kind of scum I would be dealing with so I always get turned off the idea. I recall talking to about a dozen companies over the past 2 years who were scouting me for an h1b. This is what a conversation would be like between me and then
Me: hmm...indian accent, it seems they are alot of Indians working in your company. Would you mind telling me how many desis(slang for people of South Asia) work there?
They: Ok so far eggjaample we are have total 50 here and 48 of them from India most are doing berry bell, we help in resume building so aaal are being emplaayed. YOu will get projects, you dont taaak about bench things. Dont worry we are in this field since last 8 years. We will not promise you anything but if interested send first installment of 1500 daalarz and we will process you. If we cant get Java duvlupmunt profile for you we will put you into something else so once you are here. If you want GC, charges extra.
me: mind telling me what you mean by the phrase "other profile".
They: We are not appreciate such questions.
me: [click]

note:I am not trying to offend anyone by imitating the way they spoke to me. but just trying to prove a point of the kind of cons that are going on under the garb of "consulting firms". It seems a bigger problems than people faking their profile to come to the U.S. is scam artists who fly to America with an intent to set up this kind of a criminal network where the modus operandi is to primarily get people in the U.S. for a handsome fee. Once off the boat live off a cut of their salary regardless of if they work at a Laundromat or a tech company.
 
Mark Herschberg
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Originally posted by Anand Hariharan:

Actually, you've just demonstrated that there is more supply from science and engineering education than from medical and law. You are still some distance from showing that translates to "more demand".



I'm not sure if you're not familiar with the professional requirements for some field or are just confused on your economics; either way, you're wrong.

To the first point, even though I have a computer science degree, tomorrow I can decide to be an actor and change to that profession. That does not hold true for medicine and law--if you want to go into that profession, you must enroll in an accredited university.* Therefore we know the level of interest in that field by the enrollment in graduate schools (unlike in a field like acting).

Now to the confusion over supply and demand. If I have 5 paintings, and create 5 more, I've doubled my supply. On the other hand, if 5 people go to the river every day to get water, and then one day 10 people to go the river to get water, I have doubled my demand for water (the supply of water in the river remains constant).

The number of students enrolling demonstrate a demand for that profession, as the school is the only way to enter the profession.** Now this doesn't directly say anything about supply/demand in the labor market, but that isn't germane to the discussion. The incorrect claim was that people choose law, business, and medical schools of engineering schools, but the numbers show the demand is in the opposite direction.

What likely confused you is that the supply on one side becomes demand on another. McDonald's wants meat and so creates a demand in the meat market. It turns this meat into hamburgers and creates a supply in the hamburger market. Likewise students interested in grad school create a demand for education in that market that reflects the demand for entry into that labor vertical. Upon graduation, they create a supply of workers in that field. If there was more or less demand for hamburgers, the number of McDonald's would be different; likewise if there was more of less demand for entry into a field, there would be more or less graduate schools in that field. Given that there are more slots for engineering schools than for medicine and law, we see that the demand to go into engineering exceeds the interest in medicine, law, and business.

--Mark


*You can take the bar in some states without attending law school but it's a very small percentage of lawyers who do (less than 1% I think).

**Engineering doesn't statutorily require a degree for the field, although it's a reasonable assumption that anyone in a graduate engineering program intents to be an engineer, and unlike law and medicine many more may wish to work in the field who don't enroll in a graduate degree, so whereas law and medicine provide an upper bound, engineering provides a rough lower bound.
 
Anand Hariharan
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Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:

I'm not sure if you're not familiar with the professional requirements
for some field or are just confused on your economics; either way,
you're wrong.




Your writing in your previous post was suggestive of being substantiated
by fact and hence cogent, but there was also a lot of connect-the-dots
and hand-waving going on beneath.

Now you are gratuitously presuming to know what I am not familiar with
and/or where I am confused. I will ignore this, assuming it is just a
cheap debating trick.


Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:

The number of students enrolling demonstrate a demand for that
profession, as the school is the only way to enter the profession.**
Now this doesn't directly say anything about supply/demand in the labor
market, but that isn't germane to the discussion. The incorrect claim
was that people choose law, business, and medical schools of engineering
schools, but the numbers show the demand is in the opposite direction.



This, I will accept (or 'concede' if you would prefer to hear). Your
water-from-river analogy also helped clarifying. Thank you.

- Anand
 
Glen Cai
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Originally posted by Mark Herschberg:


Can you provide some evidence of this from a reputed source or is it just your opinion?

...

--Mark



Check out this article:

http://blogs.computerworld.com/what_is_wrong_with_american_engineering_and_how_to_fix_it
 
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