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Writing Apps for iPhones

 
Rancher
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I have been reading J2SE for 4-5 months now and have gained a fair level of understanding. However, i want to try a hand at mobile App development.
I thought of writing applications that could run on iPhones; so i thought of versing myself in J2ME. Google on this subject tells me that J2ME is not supported on iPhones yet and Objective C is used instead.

A few Questions:
1. How easy would the transition be - what does such an undertaking require of me(w.r.t technologies)?
2. is there enough documentation...book, perhaps?

If anyone can share a link which throws some light on iPhones App development and things alike, i will be obliged.

I am not sure if this is the right forum for this topic; please "move" the thread otherwise..(asking questions about iPhones, which doesnt support JAVA, on JavaRanch seems meaningless!!)
[ December 19, 2008: Message edited by: Monu Tripathi ]
 
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Register your account with Apple and start with iPhone SDK
 
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First, note that you need an Intel Mac running OS 10.5 in order to use the iPhone SDK.

iPhone apps are written in Objective-C (an object-oriented version of C) using Apple's Cocoa frameworks for Mac and Touch (iPhone and iPod Touch). Xcode (Apple's free IDE) includes documentation with a lot of tutorials. But if you prefer a textbook approach...

If you do not have experience with C, then I suggest starting with Programming in C (3rd ed) by Stephen Kochan. This will be a quick, easy read coming from a Java background, but there are a lot of critical details covered here.

Next, I suggest Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X (3rd ed) by Aaron Hillegass. This also serves as a much-needed guide for learning Xcode. Then for getting into iPhone details, there's The iPhone Developer's Cookbook: Building Applications with the iPhone SDK by Erica Sadun.

(Moving to the Mac OS forum, where this has come up before.)
 
Monu Tripathi
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I'd imagine C++ as the object oriented version of C..maybe i got confused between extension and version.


Thanks for you replies..
 
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Originally posted by Monu Tripathi:
I'd imagine C++ as the object oriented version of C.

C, C++, and Objective-C are not extensions or versions of each other. They are simply different languages that somewhat resemble each other in their basic syntax.
 
marc weber
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True, I should not have said "version."

Maybe Wikipedia can offer some clarification...

Objective-C is a very thin layer on top of C. Objective-C is a strict superset of C. That is, it is possible to compile any C program with an Objective-C compiler. Objective-C derives its syntax from both C and Smalltalk.


This is why I found I needed a C foundation before getting into Objective-C. The Hillegass text I mentioned above is very good at introducing the object-oriented (messaging) aspects of Objective-C, but it assumes a C foundation.
[ December 24, 2008: Message edited by: marc weber ]
 
Bear Bibeault
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That fact that so many languages since C have adopted C-style syntax is probably very confusing to many. Look at how often Java is confused with JavaScript (yeah, I know ECMAscript sucks as a name, but couldn't they have picked something other than JavaScript?)
 
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How about "LiveScript"?
 
Bear Bibeault
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LOL. I can see why they dumped "LiveScript" (sounds way too much like buzzy-marketing-spiel jargon), but JavaScript was a poor substitute.
 
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