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Closing Statement.  RSS feed

 
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Hi

I am new to jdbc, closing a Statement is releasing its resources, I am wondering if this will include closing the connection itself.
also If I am connecting to localhost db,
Is creating a new Connection will be costy?
Is creating new Statement will be costy?

Thanks
 
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Hi Costa,
Closing a statement will not close the connection because a connection is a higher level concept. Closing a connection will sometimes close a statement but you should not rely on this.

Creating a connection is usually relatively costly. This is why people use connection pools. Creating a statement is not costly and a frequent operation.
 
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Assuming that you're using a decent JDBC driver, closing a statement will only close any opened resultsets and closing a connection will close any opened statements and indirectly also its opened resultsets.

Obtaining a connection is the most expensive task in JDBC. You can improve performance by using connection pooling. When you're developing a webapplication, it's good to know that most self-respected application servers offers JNDI connection pooling out of the box. When you're developing a client application, then you may need to add connection pooling libraries so that you can make use of it. Commonly used ones are Apache Commons DBCP, C3P0 and Proxool
 
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