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General question

 
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This is not a question specifically regarding the book "Reporting with Ruby and Rails", by David Berube; however, it was notification of his book that brought my attention to this particular forum.

So here is my question - and please forgive me if it's either redundant or too oft asked ... why is there a special forum here for totally non-Java related topics such as this?

Please note that I ask this seriously and mean no disrespect or sarcasm. I am simply curious. But beyond the fact that many Java programmers are also web programmers, and that many Java programmers might also be familiar with ROR ... I mean, is there a closeness with Java that I am unaware of? Regards,

~Bill
 
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Bill, the reason why there are non-Java related forums at JavaRanch is because this community doesn't exist in a vacuum with just Java stuff. Some of us may be on projects involving .NET, C++, Ruby, etc. and, frankly, the online communities focused on those "other" technologies aren't quite as nice as JavaRanch is... In practice, the people here know about this stuff so why not facilitate us helping each other in those fields as well? Well, that's how I see it.

Regarding Ruby on Rails and Java having a connection you're not seeing, there is no such connection. Although the JRuby guys have been working hard to make their JVM-based Ruby implementation able to run Rails applications.
 
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Would you also ask this question of the HTML/JavaScript forum?
 
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Originally posted by Lasse Koskela:
Regarding Ruby on Rails and Java having a connection you're not seeing, there is no such connection. Although the JRuby guys have been working hard to make their JVM-based Ruby implementation able to run Rails applications.



Well, as I said in a previous post, I'm no expert, but what I know is that version 0.9.8 that was released 11 months ago supported rails, with 98,6% of the 2807 Rails-specific test cases execute successfully. Netbeans 6 also comes ruby, jruby and rails support.

Originally posted by Bill Johnston:
So here is my question - and please forgive me if it's either redundant or too oft asked ... why is there a special forum here for totally non-Java related topics such as this?



Well, Sun Microsystems itself added a scripting API starting from java 6. Doesn't this say something? I believe that each language has its advantages, and if we integrate several languages together, we could make use of all of the advantages of all languages.
[ February 06, 2008: Message edited by: Alaa Nassef ]
 
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I'd also strongly suggest that a purely vertical definition is dangerous - if you think of yourself as a ".net programmer", "Java programmer," or "Ruby programmer", you're limiting yourself. It's much better to think of yourself as someone who creates software or solves problems - or, even better, as an artist or craftsman. The tools are just a means to an end, and you should not let them limit you.

In fact, the less likely a particular connection is, the more likely it is to give you an edge over the competition. If you use an uncommon combination of tools, you can likely accomplish something other people can't.

Take it easy,
David Berube
 
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