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Quiz: Do you deserve your high school diploma?

 
Rancher
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I had to share this one since I did so well. I did have to guess on two of them, but apparently I guessed correctly.

Do you deserve your high school diploma?

<div style="width: 320px; border: 1px solid gray; padding: 6px; font: normal 12px sans-serif; color: black; background-color: white;">You paid attention during 100% of high school! <div style="width: 200px; background: white; border: 1px solid black; text-align: left;"><div style="width: 100%; background: red; font-size: 8px; line-height: 8px;">  </div></div>

85-100% You must be an autodidact, because American high schools don't get scores that high! Good show, old chap!

Do you deserve your high school diploma?
Create a Quiz
</div>
[ November 28, 2006: Message edited by: Ryan McGuire ]

 
Wanderer
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Hm, question 11 seems ambiguous; it depends where you draw the borders. Tossing out this obviously flawed question , I got 100%
 
author
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91% here - but I couldn't determine which one(s) I missed ?
 
Jim Yingst
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There doesn't seem to be a feature to quickly show which you missed - but you can use the back button, change one answer, resubmit, and see if the score goes up or down. Repeat until 100%.
 
lowercase baba
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I missed the one on the 3 largest religions.
 
Author
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97% here, but i do not know which one i missed.
 
Ranch Hand
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#13 is ambiguous, though very few people know that.
So is #18.

The stuff I got wrong (got 91% on the first try, 100% on the second) wasn't taught to me in school so I had to guess (modern art and the like).
 
author and iconoclast
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<div style="width: 320px; border: 1px solid gray; padding: 6px; font: normal 12px sans-serif; color: black; background-color: white;">You paid attention during 100% of high school! <div style="width: 200px; background: white; border: 1px solid black; text-align: left;"><div style="width: 100%; background: red; font-size: 8px; line-height: 8px;"> </div></div>

85-100% You must be an autodidact, because American high schools don't get scores that high! Good show, old chap!

Do you deserve your high school diploma?
Create a Quiz

</div>

 
pie sneak
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I had #14 wrong, which I went back and forth on. So embarrassing!
<div style="width: 320px; border: 1px solid gray; padding: 6px; font: normal 12px sans-serif; color: black; background-color: white;">You paid attention during 97% of high school! <div style="width: 200px; background: white; border: 1px solid black; text-align: left;"><div style="width: 97%; background: red; font-size: 8px; line-height: 8px;"> </div></div>

85-100% You must be an autodidact, because American high schools don't get scores that high! Good show, old chap!

Do you deserve your high school diploma?
Create a Quiz

</div>

 
Jim Yingst
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[Jeroen]: #13 is ambiguous, though very few people know that.

Hm, are you referring to a couple island autonomous regions? Or something else? I'm thinking that in any case, one of the given answers is much better than the others, even if it's not perfect.

[Jeroen]: So is #18.

Oh, how's that? Does your alternate explanation apply for both northern and southern hemispheres?

I suggest using <font color="beige"> tags to conceal your response, if you need to go into too much detail. E.g. [Spoilery info here] I figure beige, white or tan are good enough for our purposes here; people are unlikely to be able to read it accidentally, but they can tell something's there.
[ November 28, 2006: Message edited by: Jim Yingst ]
 
ranger
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Not bad, but not perfect

<div style="width: 320px; border: 1px solid gray; padding: 6px; font: normal 12px sans-serif; color: black; background-color: white;">You paid attention during 74% of high school! <div style="width: 200px; background: white; border: 1px solid black; text-align: left;"><div style="width: 74%; background: red; font-size: 8px; line-height: 8px;"> </div></div>

68-84% Pretty good, you know that there are libraries and newspapers, and you remember what you've read. You were a child that wasn't left behind!

Do you deserve your high school diploma?
Create a Quiz

</div>

Mark

 
Jeroen T Wenting
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Originally posted by Jim Yingst:
[Jeroen]: #13 is ambiguous, though very few people know that.

Hm, are you referring to a couple island autonomous regions? Or something else? I'm thinking that in any case, one of the given answers is much better than the others, even if it's not perfect.



Yup, islands and regions in Africa and Asia.
Similarly Denmark is often called one of the smallest countries in Europe when it's in fact the larges, counting Greenland (and is located in Europe AND North America as a result).



[Jeroen]: So is #18.

Oh, how's that? Does your alternate explanation apply for both northern and southern hemispheres?

I suggest using <font color="beige"> tags to conceal your response, if you need to go into too much detail. E.g. [Spoilery info here] I figure beige, white or tan are good enough for our purposes here; people are unlikely to be able to read it accidentally, but they can tell something's there.

[ November 28, 2006: Message edited by: Jim Yingst ]



The distance of the planet to the sun does have some small influence at least on the northern hemisphere (where this question relates to, being an American question aimed at American kids).
The question is clearly wrong of course, as in for example tropical regions there is no or hardly any seasonal change in temperatures at all.
And I can distinctly remember the summer this year in Europe being no warmer than autumn. In fact november thus far has been warmer at times than our summer which was extremely poor.
 
Jim Yingst
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OK, skipping the spoiler protection then...

[Jeroen]: Yup, islands and regions in Africa and Asia.

Let's see, we've got the Azores and Madeira islands, and...? What else? We are talking about the present, aren't we?

[Jeroen]: The distance of the planet to the sun does have some small influence at least on the northern hemisphere

The question was "Why is it warmer in summer than in winter?" In January the Earth is five million km closer to the sun than it is in July. This would explain why it's warmer in what we in the Northern hemisphere call "winter" than it is in what we call "summer". Except of course, it isn't, with rare exceptions. You're suggesting an explanation for a secondary effect which is opposite the primary effect which was described and asked about.

[Jeroen]: The question is clearly wrong of course, as in for example tropical regions there is no or hardly any seasonal change in temperatures at all.

Axial tilt explains why the seasons are opposite in the northern and southern hemisphere, and also why the tropics are relatively season-free - because the tropics are in between the north and south. Putting it another way, it's because the difference between, say cos 0° and cos 47° is smaller than the diffference between cos 30° and cos 77°. According to the axial tilt theory, seasonal variation near the equator should be considerably smaller than seaonal variation away from the equator. So, thank you for pointing out this evidence supporting the axial tilt explanation.
[ November 28, 2006: Message edited by: Jim Yingst ]
 
Rancher
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I particularly liked the explanation that it's warmer in summer "Because the sun ... rises more frequently."
[ November 29, 2006: Message edited by: Ulf Dittmer ]
 
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<div style="width: 320px; border: 1px solid gray; padding: 6px; font: normal 12px sans-serif; color: black; background-color: white;">You paid attention during 69% of high school! <div style="width: 200px; background: white; border: 1px solid black; text-align: left;"><div style="width: 69%; background: red; font-size: 8px; line-height: 8px;"> </div></div>

68-84% Pretty good, you know that there are libraries and newspapers, and you remember what you've read. You were a child that wasn't left behind!

Do you deserve your high school diploma?
Create a Quiz

</div>

I felt very bad after scoring just 69%, but it's actually true. I feel I could have done much better.

 
fred rosenberger
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Originally posted by Ulf Dittmer:
I particularly liked the explanation that it's warmer in summer "Because the sun ... rises more frequently."

[ November 29, 2006: Message edited by: Ulf Dittmer ]



But doesn't the sun rise more frequently? I mean, since the days get longer, the sun has to come up sooner, and stay up later. that means that from day 1 to day 2, the sunrise might come after 23h 59m 59s, but for the next day to be longer, the sun would have to come up after 23h 59m 58s.
 
Jeroen T Wenting
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Let's see, we've got the Azores and Madeira islands, and...? What else? We are talking about the present, aren't we?



Macao. Still officially a Portuguese property AFAIK.
 
Sheriff
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Originally posted by Jeroen T Wenting:
Macao. Still officially a Portuguese property AFAIK.

Wikipedia says

The administrative power over Macau was transferred to the People's Republic of China (PRC) in 1999, and it is now one of two special administrative regions of the PRC, together with Hong Kong.

 
(instanceof Sidekick)
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<div style="width: 320px; border: 1px solid gray; padding: 6px; font: normal 12px sans-serif; color: black; background-color: white;">You paid attention during 91% of high school! <div style="width: 200px; background: white; border: 1px solid black; text-align: left;"><div style="width: 91%; background: red; font-size: 8px; line-height: 8px;"> </div></div>

85-100% You must be an autodidact, because American high schools don't get scores that high! Good show, old chap!

Do you deserve your high school diploma?
Create a Quiz

</div>

Wish they said which ones were wrong.

 
Jim Yingst
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The official answers:

3. 6
4. infinite
5. 2.5
6. False
7. England
8. 17th century
9. Jesus
10. 2nd: Islam, Hinduism, Christianity
11. False
12. 4: the avant-garde art movement...
13. Europe
14. false
15. 4th: It's annoying in its redundancy.
16. Michelangelo
17. 1st: Being very patriotic...
18. 2nd: Because the Earth's tilt...
19. Twelth Night
20. true
21. photosynthesis
 
Ulf Dittmer
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Originally posted by fred rosenberger:
But doesn't the sun rise more frequently?



Sure, the intervals and the daily uptime change, but it still rises exactly once a day (which is what I interpret "rise frequency" to mean).
 
fred rosenberger
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You do know i was kidding, right?
 
Jim Yingst
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I suppose you can look at the changing sunrise times as a form of (very small) frequency modulation - but in that case, the frequency is greatest in spring (sunrise getting earlier every day) and lowest in fall (sunrise later every day). The frequency in the middle of summer is the same as the frequency in the middle of winter - exactly one per day. Still doesn't make sense to say it's more frequent in summer.
 
Jim Yingst
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[fred]: You do know i was kidding, right?

The argument contained just enough truth to be dangerous.
 
Jeroen T Wenting
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Originally posted by Ulf Dittmer:


Sure, the intervals and the daily uptime change, but it still rises exactly once a day (which is what I interpret "rise frequency" to mean).



define "day"
 
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<div style="width: 320px; border: 1px solid gray; padding: 6px; font: normal 12px sans-serif; color: black; background-color: white;">You paid attention during 29% of high school! <div style="width: 200px; background: white; border: 1px solid black; text-align: left;"><div style="width: 29%; background: red; font-size: 8px; line-height: 8px;"> </div></div>

17-33% I hope you don't vote, because that would be irresponsible. You know high school education is free in America, right?

Do you deserve your high school diploma?
Create a Quiz

</div>

 
Ryan McGuire
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Originally posted by Jim Yingst:
The official answers:

...



Official, but not all correct. Try using those answers in the quiz.
 
Jim Yingst
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Ryan, I just did, once again, and they give 100%. "Official" was chosen as my way of saying "these are the answers the quiz author thinks are correct". Is there a particular item you wish to discuss?
 
fred rosenberger
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for 7, i chose 1, and for 9, i chose the other answer. i still got 100%.
 
Jim Yingst
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Interesting. Now I'm getting very badly screwed-up responses. I think maybe there's some sort of caching going on here, as it now often responds with 100% for answers it previously considered wrong. I know I've seen it reject the Italy answer for #7 - but I've also seen it accepted. I've also seen it accept wrong answers for many of the other questions, when the question is revisited. I tried deleting cookies, and that initially seemed to fix the problem, but then after awhile, it didn't (even deleting them again). Very strange. As for #9, it seems to accept either answer - even back when I had no history on the site, it accepted my incorrect answer of "Jesus". Maybe they decided that wasn't a good question for "high school" so much as "catechism school".
 
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I got 97% - with the answers that Jim gave - I know I got question 1 correct - could I have fluffed question 2???

 
Jim Yingst
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For what it's worth, my answer above for #9 was definitely wrong, in the real world. Whether it's considered wrong by the test seems to vary somewhat randomly. Don't count on meaningful responses from this thing.
 
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63%

I scored a lot more than back in school - in the mists of the past! Silly human brain! I can't believe this is all what millions of years of evolution could produce. Just gray goo!

Or on second thought, may be I have a bad copy!?
 
Ryan McGuire
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Originally posted by Jim Yingst:
For what it's worth, my answer above for #9 was definitely wrong, in the real world. Whether it's considered wrong by the test seems to vary somewhat randomly. Don't count on meaningful responses from this thing.



I think you are having a caching issue. I turned off all caching in my browser and got consistently correct #9 is Mary answers.
 
Sheriff
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I agree with number 9 being:

Mary, not Jesus

From Wikipedia:

The Immaculate Conception is a Roman Catholic dogma that asserts that Mary, the mother of Jesus, was preserved by God from the stain of original sin at the time of her own conception.
 
Jim Yingst
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Yes, this was the point of my saying "For what it's worth, my answer above for #9 was definitely wrong, in the real world." As well as my earlier "it accepted my incorrect answer of 'Jesus'." Yes, "Jesus" was wrong, "Mary" is right. I'm abandoning spoiler protection since it seems I must be absolutely clear on this point.
 
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I was very surprised that the question about the "immaculate conception" made part of this test. Is this really representitive of the body of knowledge taught in American high schools? Never been to an American school, but it must be hard to be an atheist there (or, God forbid, a Buddhist or a Muslim).
 
Jim Yingst
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[John Smith]: Is this really representitive of the body of knowledge taught in American high schools?

Not at all - unless it's a catholic school. It's possible that a few people learned this in a public school, but in general I think it would be pretty rare.

All the other questions seem like they're "in scope" for a US public high school education. Which is not to say that everything there is actually taught in all schools - I don't think I ever heard of the Magna Carta in my high school, for example - but it's all stuff that has a good chance of being taught, at least.
[ December 02, 2006: Message edited by: Jim Yingst ]
 
Jeroen T Wenting
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why would learning something about Christianity and its history be a bad thing for Muslims or Hindus?
Maybe if people learned more about what makes other cultures tick they'd all get along better...
As it is a lot of conflict (both interpersonal and between nations or tribes) is caused by disagreement about trivialities or misunderstanding the other to the extent of thinking they're fundamentally disagreeable.

Of course that shouldn't take the disturbing direction currently visible in European and American schools where ever more kids are taught to be "accepting" of other cultures to the exclusion of their own (see for example the concerted attacks on Christianity and normal male/female relations in US schools and the establishment of special Muslim courts and schools in Europe where kids are taught Muslim religion and culture to the exclusion of the culture of their host nations.

Instead kids should learn the culture of the country they're living and learn to accept and be a part of that while learning enough of other cultures to accept those not as a threat but an opportunity.

Personally I've visited many countries and cultures, and I always try to learn enough about a country to at the least be a good guest.
That means to me knowing what offends people in the country I'm visiting and refraining from doing those things.
If everyone were to do that, also people coming to my country to live here, there would be a lot less resentment of other cultures. And such learning should start at an early age.
 
Jim Yingst
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I wasn't commenting on whether details of Catholic doctrine should be taught in public schools, but I'm stating that by and large it isn't in the US, as far as I know. (Does anyone here have experience to the contrary?) Aside from that, I'd really rather not have this become a political/religious thread.
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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