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What was your first PC?

 
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My first PC was a Olivetti M24 which I bought 1983 (with a 10MB HDD)

 
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The first computer that I owned was the Commodore 64 -- although I have done Basic and Assembly (6502) programming on the Pet and Vic 20 (both also Commodore computers) prior to getting the 64.

Too bad they don't make computers like that anymore... (nolstalgic smile)

Henry
 
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I started with a Sharp PC-1211, which probably doesn't qualify as a PC even though it was programmable in Basic.


The first more traditional desktop computer was an Apple // Europlus.


Like Henry, I had cut my teeth with Basic and 6502 Assembler at school on a PET-2001 by that time.
 
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My first personal computer was a DECsystem-20, which cost a million dollars or so on up. I was in charge of all systems programming, they were mine (we had six).

Because TOPS-20 was so useful and did multi-tasking for users, I could not stand the thought of using a PC in the 80s.

The first development project that I worked on was programming Windows 2.11 in C. Those were the bad old days. We moved to Windows 3.0 as it was released.

I bought my own first "PC" in October 1990, it was an ALR 386/33 with Windows.

I replaced it with a 486/66 for NT beta testing, and replaced that with a Pentium Pro 200 that was literally serial number 001 from Micron.

I haven't counted recently, a few years ago my college aged kid counted 16 PCs in the house.
 
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I used Apple II's in school earlier than this, but the first one I actually owned was the TI-99/4A my parents bought me in high school.



You could just program this thing in BASIC, but the BASIC had PEEK and POKE, and you could get a manual for the custom microprocessor, so therefore I was able to write an assembler for the thing, in BASIC. In assembly, I was able to write Asteroids and Pac-man and such. Great, great fun.

I remember that the processor in this thing had NO general-purpose registers. Instead there was a "workspace pointer"; you set the workspace pointer to point to a block of memory and the pointed-to 16 words acted as the register file. To call a subroutine and save the registers, you had to move the workspace pointer to a new spot in memory. The machine instruction for this was BLWP, "Branch and Load Workspace Pointer", which in my head is pronounced "Blowup".

Self-modifying code. Lots and lots of self-modifying code. Fun, fun. I miss it.
[ November 16, 2007: Message edited by: Ernest Friedman-Hill ]
 
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The first computer I owned was one I build myself: the TEC-1



That image is the basic kit. I also added on a graphics display, an EEPROM burner, NVRAM, switchable ROMs, and doubled the RAM (4K - woohoo!). It was programmed by entering in the address you wanted to start at then entering in the machine code.

I had been working with computers long before that, and my family owned an Apple II around that time as well. The first commercial personal computer I purchased was a 386 laptop.

Regards, Andrew
 
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Ernest,
Where is the monitor/screen/output display on that? It looks so much like a typewriter!
 
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The first pc I owned (given to me, used, by a cousin) is an Apple 2e.
 
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I bought an IBM XT shortly after they were announced. Remember the Charlie Chaplain ads? I had a relative at IBM who bought it at employee prices for me. I added a $600 Six Pack card to get me up to 640K and a 1200 baud modem. I swapped the Intel chip for another that was some 10% faster. That was almost too exciting.
 
Ernest Friedman-Hill
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Originally posted by Jeanne Boyarsky:
Ernest,
Where is the monitor/screen/output display on that? It looks so much like a typewriter!



It plugged into a color TV using a big bulky "RF modulator" cable from a port on the back. There is a port on the left for a pair of joysticks, and a port on the right for an "expansion box." I eventually got an expansion box with 32K of additional RAM (!) which vastly improved the machine.

There was also a port to connect the thing to a tape deck; analog tape was the main storage device, unless you could afford to drop quite a few benjamins for a floppy drive.
 
Ulf Dittmer
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Originally posted by Ernest Friedman-Hill:
I eventually got an expansion box with 32K of additional RAM (!) which vastly improved the machine.


Did I mention that the PC-1211 had 1424 bytes of memory?

As I recall it, there was a certain envy towards those with a TI-99/4A, because that was the only machine that had a 16-bit processor. Everybody else had just 8 bit CPUs, either the 6502, or the 6809, or the 8080 and its compatible chips like the Z-80.
 
Jeanne Boyarsky
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Originally posted by Ernest Friedman-Hill:
It plugged into a color TV using a big bulky "RF modulator" cable from a port on the back.


Ah. Thanks!
 
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Amstrad CPC 6128

A friend of mine had this great game on Amastrad 464, which took like half an hour to load on tape. Here is a game I've spent too much time on !
 
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A Timex-Sinclair 1000, with a 16K memory expansion.

[ November 18, 2007: Message edited by: Ed Villamizar ]
 
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My first computer was a computer from a local computer comany

200Mhz 64kb Ram 8GB HD running windows 95 with 15" monitor it was top the line back in 1997. I am now on my third computer, got it for Christmas this year(early).
 
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The first computer I ever had was a BBC Model B.



A great little machine. I think my parents bought it for me to do homework. I ended up playing Elite and Chuckie Egg instead.
 
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