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How many lands ?

 
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How many lands did columbus found other than america ?
 
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there is debate on whether he even 'found' that one... after all, he was greeted by the native americans. How can you 'find' something that someone else has been living on for thousands of years?

It is also believed that the vikings had already been here before Columbus as well. So, again, how could he have found something that others had already been to?
 
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fred rosenberger wrote:there is debate on whether he even 'found' that one... after all, he was greeted by the native americans. How can you 'find' something that someone else has been living on for thousands of years?

It is also believed that the vikings had already been here before Columbus as well. So, again, how could he have found something that others had already been to?

The Vikings are irrelevant, as their information was not publicized until long after the Spanish had begun exploring. (There is also a theory that Chinese had discovered the New World seventy years earlier, but if so then they too suppressed this information.)

As for the natives who were living there, that's also irrelevant to Columbus' credit for discovering their islands -- the native Americans themselves didn't even know where they were. You could have asked any one of them, "Where is your island, in relation to Europe?" and all you'd have gotten would have been a blank stare (and maybe an arrow in the gut).

The word "native" is itself a curious word. Originally it meant simply someone living in the region where he and his ancestors were born. Then, with the advent of Hollywood westerns and Tarzan movies the word began to mean "primitive savage." Later it changed back to its original meaning.
 
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Frank Silbermann wrote:
As for the natives who were living there, that's also irrelevant to Columbus' credit for discovering their islands -- the native Americans themselves didn't even know where they were. You could have asked any one of them, "Where is your island, in relation to Europe?" and all you'd have gotten would have been a blank stare (and maybe an arrow in the gut).



Columbus was the first to proclaim the discovery. The vikings didn't care because they didn't want to stick around (except for the temporary settlement they built, keyword temporary) and the native Americans were obviously already there. And you couldn't have asked the natives that question. No one spoke their language. So that seems a bit unfair to assume they couldn't answer the question when the question couldn't have been asked. At least not until communications were possible.

 
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Gregg Bolinger wrote:

Frank Silbermann wrote:
As for the natives who were living there, that's also irrelevant to Columbus' credit for discovering their islands -- the native Americans themselves didn't even know where they were. You could have asked any one of them, "Where is your island, in relation to Europe?" and all you'd have gotten would have been a blank stare (and maybe an arrow in the gut).



... you couldn't have asked the natives that question. No one spoke their language. So that seems a bit unfair to assume they couldn't answer the question when the question couldn't have been asked. At least not until communications were possible.

Even if you could speak their language, they didn't even have a _word_ for "Europe"! So they simply _couldn't_ have told you where they were. Their ancestors wandered across the Bering Strait and got lost for 20,000 years, until Columbus found them.
 
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Frank Silbermann wrote:The Vikings are irrelevant, as their information was not publicized until long after the Spanish had begun exploring. (There is also a theory that Chinese had discovered the New World seventy years earlier, but if so then they too suppressed this information.)

As for the natives who were living there, that's also irrelevant to Columbus' credit for discovering their islands -- the native Americans themselves didn't even know where they were. You could have asked any one of them, "Where is your island, in relation to Europe?" and all you'd have gotten would have been a blank stare (and maybe an arrow in the gut).



Does that mean that we shouldn't change who invented something just because they didn't have a good PR man? I mean if we found out today that 10 years before the Wright Brothers flew someone else did, but they just 'didn't publicize it', we should stick with saying the Wright Brothers were the first to fly?

When Columbus got to America, HE couldn't tell you where he was either, in relation to Europe. He thought he was in Asia.

And I'm pretty sure the native americans knew where they were...they were home.
 
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I have one doubt since my childhood.

What would have happened if Columbus did not find america and any one else? would it be still unknown to the entire world?
 
chetan deol
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We are diverting from question.
Is there any other discovered land by columbus rather than america ?
 
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Depends how you define "America". He found a number of islands that aren't part of the mainland of either North or South America, but are generally considered part of the continent(s) nonetheless. If you want details, this seems like a reasonable place to start.
 
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fred rosenberger wrote:

Frank Silbermann wrote:The Vikings are irrelevant, as their information was not publicized until long after the Spanish had begun exploring. (There is also a theory that Chinese had discovered the New World seventy years earlier, but if so then they too suppressed this information.)

Does that mean that we shouldn't change who invented something just because they didn't have a good PR man? I mean if we found out today that 10 years before the Wright Brothers flew someone else did, but they just 'didn't publicize it', we should stick with saying the Wright Brothers were the first to fly?

When Columbus got to America, HE couldn't tell you where he was either, in relation to Europe. He thought he was in Asia.

And I'm pretty sure the native Americans knew where they were...they were home.

Obviously, the Vikings were first. But from our perspective, Columbus was the discoverer, because it was because of him that we know. And even though Columbus thought he was in Asia, he knew he was to the west of Europe (and he was). The people living there may have "known" they were home, but they had no idea where home was (in relation to Europe). From our perspective, that's what matters.

chetan dhumane wrote:We are diverting from question.
Is there any other discovered land by Columbus rather than America ?

Columbus discovered only a few islands (and maybe saw a bit of South America). Others who followed him mapped out the rest of the two continents (just as most of the existing airplane patents were filed by people after the Wright Brothers). I don't know who discovered Antarctica and Australia. Beyond that, there were only a few islands here and there to discover (e.g. Hawaii by Captain Cook).

What is also interesting about Columbus is that he wanted his descendants to rule one of the islands he discovered (I think it was Jamaica) and got the concession. He and his descendants kept the Inquisition out so that it could be a haven for secret Jews whom the Spanish and Portuguese had made to convert to Christianity. That infuriated the Church, and their desire to get the Spanish king to rescind those rights may be one of the reasons a Spanish priest wrote an incredible and horrifying account of Columbus himself torturing, maiming and exterminating the Arowak natives. (More likely, they died out of European diseases such as smallpox and measles, which spread like wildfire throughout the New World and killed 90% of the North American natives even before much of North America had even been seen by Europeans.) Even more interesting is the way the American Left discovered that screed against Columbus and accepted it at face value.

 
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Does anyone know what language did the native north americans speak? Does it seems a little bit like middle age's english?
 
Gregg Bolinger
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Eduardo Bueno wrote:Does anyone know what language did the native north americans speak? Does it seems a little bit like middle age's english?



Come on folks. You really think JavaRanch is the best place to find this information out? There's already a ton of info available on this kind of stuff if you just hit google, wikipedia, etc...


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iroquoian_languages
 
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Did Columbus really land in Columbus, Ohio?
 
Frank Silbermann
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Eduardo Bueno wrote:Does anyone know what language did the native north americans speak? Does it seems a little bit like middle age's english?

Very little is known about North American native languages. However, a few of elements common to the various native American languages is the word "How" as a greeting (said with the right hand raised vertically with elbow sharply bent to show the palm to the person being greeted), "um" as a word suffix, and the avoidance of nominative-case personal pronoun in favor of those of objective case (as in "Him have-um heap big house" for "He has a large home.") In many ways, it resembles the speech patterns of Tarzan and Frankenstein.
 
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