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Do you think JPA will achieve what JDO could not?  RSS feed

 
Ulas Ergin
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Hi,
I wonder why did Sun need yet another specification while JDO at hand?
JDO did not gain widespread acceptance,do you think JPA will? and if so why?

what makes JPA a better way than JDO,I only came up with 2 ideas

-JPA is new and Java community likes new tech [but JDO was new once upon a time...]
-JPA spec is subpart of EJB and EJB has acceptence in java developer and vendor camps.

what do you think?
 
Cameron Wallace McKenzie
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JPA is being widely used, and with Hibernate as a persistence provider, and the depth with which JPA is anchored in the EJB3 spec, I think it has legs. JPA 2.0 looks great as well.

It has a future. It's as strong a bet as anything else out there, if not a bit stronger.

-Cameron McKenzie
 
Aurelian Tutuianu
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This was a long war in the past years. The JPA won, as a consequence that becomes standard in EJB3.
I don't want to start a flame on that, there are a lot of differences between them.

My conclusion on why JPA won are:
- JPA is much simpler than JDO
- JDO can to persist in any type of repository, JPA only in relational databases, BUT the relational databases are the most frequent cases so it is a calculated compromise
- JPA uses annotations a lot (now DTO uses at well, but in war time that was not the case)
- JPA covers the topics of object mapping which are very clear conceptually, JDO has still a lot of functionalities which are not very flexible or too specific
- JPA had at that time support of the biggest software vendors of persistence layers and RDBMS like: Oracle (TopLink, OracleDB) and RedHat (Hibernate)
 
Ulas Ergin
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Thank you Aurelian for this clearly stated answer.

I agree the items

1.JPA covers the topics of object mapping which are very clear conceptually, JDO has still a lot of functionalities which are not very flexible or too specific
2.JPA is much simpler than JDO
3.Hibernate support is big plus [i have doubts on toplinks contribution]

have contributed alot in this victory [since it was a war i thought victory would be a convinient word here]

and maybe

- JPA uses annotations a lot [after all Hibernate was very popular while only-XML config based so i have doubts on this]

I wish a seperate book on JPA is published.This absence creates a feeling that JPA is not a topic of interest/importance.

As far as I can see the JPA topic is covered in EJB/Hibernate books but a dedicated JPA book is missing.
A book titled Pro JPA is coming as far as I can see from amazon.
 
Ulas Ergin
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yes i know them and already read two of them,

I wish a seperate book on JPA is published.This absence creates a feeling that JPA is not a topic of interest/importance.


my emphasis was on a 'separate' book like http://www.amazon.com/Pro-JPA-Mastering-trade-Persistence/dp/1430219564/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1247755861&sr=8-1

yes, JPA is a subpart of EJB spec but it is not bound and limited to EJBs and as you already know can be used even in j2se.

thanks anyway.
 
It is sorta covered in the JavaRanch Style Guide.
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