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What do you recommend to learn in the next two years?

 
Greenhorn
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Hi, Andy. I looked at the table of contents for your book, and it looks good. It's methodic and covers a wide range. It seems general, so here is a specific question (since this is a Java based forum). What new Java based technology do you see emerging over the next two years that you recommend we start to learn strategically? I know that "Land the Tech Job you Love" isn't specifically devoted to Java, but surely you have some thoughts. Thanks! George
 
Ranch Hand
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Netbeans IDE Chrome Ubuntu
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Well, for me it depends on what you want and at what level you are at. Spring is mature and powerful.
 
George Girton
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Thanks, this advice is solid. "Don't wait until Spring to learn Spring."

Can I ask a follow up question... has Spring Web Flow emerged to a similar point of maturity & wide use?
 
Author
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The best way to see where the industry is heading:

-- Check your local employment advertisements to see what the prospective employers are looking for.

-- Check http://trends.google.com/websites?q=wikipedia.org for trends.

-- Regularly visit sites like JavaLobby, InfoQ, TheServerSide, etc to se what the industry experts are saying.

 
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George Girton wrote:surely you have some thoughts.



Unfortunately I don't have any specifics on the world of Java, because I'm not in Java programming at all. I see names like Struts and Springs and Stripes and Groovy, but I'm not familiar with any of them.

That's OK, because trying to predict the next hot technology is like trying to guess the stock market. There are plenty of computer pundits out there who do this for a living, and they get it wrong as often as not.

When you're looking at new technologies to learn, instead of going after something similar ("I know Struts, and now I'm going to learn some other Java framework"), learn something radically different. Learn Perl, or Ruby, or Haskell, or R, or Smalltalk. Learn something brand new that you've never worked with. Jump into a different sea rather than a fork in a river.

Look beyond learning new programming languages. How about entirely new ways of computing? If you're a Windows user, buy a Mac, or run Linux. If you're already running Linux, try BSD. If you're used to vi, give emacs a try. Go buy an iPhone and try developing apps for it. Shake up your entire skill set!

Ultimately, learning a given new tool probably doesn't much matter as far as your future hirability, as long as you're learning something. What matters as least as much as knowing some sexy new framework is your passion and enthusiasm for the job, for the industry, for the craft that you love. I can train on a new technology, but I can't train enthusiasm.

 
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Very good tips Andy, Thank you.
 
Sheriff
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Andy Lester wrote:
When you're looking at new technologies to learn, instead of going after something similar ("I know Struts, and now I'm going to learn some other Java framework"), learn something radically different.



I would strongly second that!

If you program in Java, don't try shaking things up by learning C#.

For fun, compare

PHP, C++, and java
java, python, ruby
erlang, python, ruby, and perl
 
arulk pillai
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In addition, you can also choose a soft-skill to improve on.
 
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