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How to shape up your java career?

 
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Hi Guys,

I need some advice on how to shape up your java career.
Currently I am working as s/w engg at a reputed firm. My total experience is 2.8 yrs.
I am working on java/j2ee (2.9 yrs) and adf faces/ jsf (from past 1 yr).

My current work/tasks do not require proficiency in the domain knowledge.
Its developing UI's using adf faces/ jsf/ client specific frameworks and writing some API's.
As a result, I am good at technical stuff, but not yet proficient in any domain specific knowledge (like mailing, access and identity management, finance etc).

I am not sure if my career is on right path since I am not proficient in any domain as of now.

I am primarily intrested in java/j2ee/designing/coding stuff.. basically core technical stuff. Also aiming to be an enterprise architect one day.
I haven't worked on databases, but did work on using LDAP API's a bit.
In my project, the other members are ones who are proficient in domain knowledge (access and idenity mgmt) and work on modules pertaining to them.
This leads me to making an observation that they are more 'valuable' to the company and have faster growth in terms of designations and perks.

I did try my hand on doing some initial microsoft project plans for my module, but I am just a beginner in that.

Another of my concerns is that since I am very much interested in technical stuff, technologies keep getting obsolete after a specific period of time.
Not sure is it worth investing lot of time into any specific technology.

Please advice on right way and direction of shaping up java career.

Thanking in anticipation.
 
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I am primarily intrested in java/j2ee/designing/coding stuff.. basically core technical stuff. Also aiming to be an enterprise architect one day.


Not sure is it worth investing lot of time into any specific technology.



An architect should know a ton of stuff -- including obsolete technologies. After all, how do you know if something is bad unless you used it before? Or another way to look at it -- even obsolete technologies have good qualities. How do you know if something new is a good idea, if you don't have previous experience of previous attempts at the technology.

Heck, this is also true of non- java technologies too.

Henry
 
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An architect should know a ton of stuff



Amen to that. The sea of knowledge out there is overwhelming at times.

How 'valuable' some one is, is subjective. How well our skills fit in a position could be a good factor in determining how valuable we are. Then again if we concentrate on sharpening our skills we wont have to worry about this ever. Skilled people are always valuable.
 
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